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The Gruffalo Jigsaw Book PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Gruffalo Jigsaw Book
Author: Julia Donaldson
Publisher: Published March 5th 2004 by Pan Macmillan (first published March 23rd 1999)
ISBN: 9781405034968
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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"A gruffalo? What's a gruffalo?" "A gruffalo! Why, didn't you know? He has terrible tusks, and terrible claws, and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws." And so begins the story of a quick-witted mouse as he encounters a host of predators who seem to think he might make a tasty treat. As he ventures deeper into the deep dark wood, stumbling across a hungry fox, a not-so-wise "A gruffalo? What's a gruffalo?" "A gruffalo! Why, didn't you know? He has terrible tusks, and terrible claws, and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws." And so begins the story of a quick-witted mouse as he encounters a host of predators who seem to think he might make a tasty treat. As he ventures deeper into the deep dark wood, stumbling across a hungry fox, a not-so-wise owl, and a slimy snake, spinning ever-extraordinary yarns about the scary, scaly gruffalo, he quickly realises that the hungry beast he has been talking of isn't imaginary after all. A witty, sly little story that wrings giggles from the belly of the reader, The Gruffalo is both stylish and hilarious, simple in its execution, as it plays skilfully on a child's fears and then shows that even the most threatening of monsters are not always as scary as they seem. A combination of read-along-rhyme by Julia Donaldson and illustrations by Alex Sheffler which perfectly capture the atmosphere of the story, The Gruffalo is an excellent picture book for 3-5-year-olds to read along with their parents, and is certain to become something of a classic. --Susan Harrison

30 review for The Gruffalo Jigsaw Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    My boy brought this to me a couple days ago, asking if I'd read it to him. I did, and it's quickly become a new favorite. It's not terribly complex, or long, or ethically enriching. But then again, not all books need to be. What this book does have is a marvelously tight and deceptively effortless rhyme and meter. I say "deceptively" here because I know that sort of thing doesn't come easily. Despite the fact that the book is wonderful fun to read, I know the author sweat blood making the language My boy brought this to me a couple days ago, asking if I'd read it to him. I did, and it's quickly become a new favorite. It's not terribly complex, or long, or ethically enriching. But then again, not all books need to be. What this book does have is a marvelously tight and deceptively effortless rhyme and meter. I say "deceptively" here because I know that sort of thing doesn't come easily. Despite the fact that the book is wonderful fun to read, I know the author sweat blood making the language work out right. Good book. Fun to read out loud. Holds up under multiple readings. Absolutely worth your time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    Brains beat brawns every time. The Gruffalo teaches children to be patient and understanding. Whilst not necessarily advocating the cunning manipulation that the mouse utilises, it does suggest that there is more to people than their outward appearance. Just because someone may appear “scary” doesn’t mean they’re a bad person, and innocent seeming things can be the worse. Judge only on actions not how one appears.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Julia Donaldson’s stories never fail to delight, and this picture book of The Gruffalo is one of the very best. First published in 1999, the scary gruffalo has become one of the world’s best-loved monsters, starring in films and shows galore, and inspiring a huge amount of merchandise. This is the original picture book which started it all, and which has itself won many awards, been translated into over fifty languages, and has been voted the UK’s favourite bedtime story. It begins with a simple Julia Donaldson’s stories never fail to delight, and this picture book of The Gruffalo is one of the very best. First published in 1999, the scary gruffalo has become one of the world’s best-loved monsters, starring in films and shows galore, and inspiring a huge amount of merchandise. This is the original picture book which started it all, and which has itself won many awards, been translated into over fifty languages, and has been voted the UK’s favourite bedtime story. It begins with a simple idea, of a little brown mouse taking a walk in a “deep dark wood”. We see a lovely illustration of the deep dark wood before the story begins … and the small child I read it to thought he might just be able to spy something sinister behind the trees, although he didn’t know the story at all … So we begin: “A mouse took a stroll through the deep dark wood. A fox saw the mouse and the mouse looked good. ‘Where are you going to, little brown mouse? Come and have lunch in my underground house.’” Oh my, what a crafty expression there is on the face of the fox! But our perky, brave little mouse is very quick-thinking: “It’s terribly kind of you, Fox, but no – I’m going to have lunch with a gruffalo!” And as he describes the tusks, teeth and jaws of the terrible monster to the fox, he finishes with: “and his favourite food is roasted fox” whereupon the fox’s eyes get very wide indeed, and he scoots off in a panic. The mouse however, calmly carries on on his way. In time he meets several other dangerous animals; a fox, an owl, and a snake. Each one whom he meets, clearly intends to eat the mouse, and invites him back to their home, ostensibly for a meal. But every time, the mouse claims he is expected by the fierce gruffalo to his house for a meal instead. We might also have felt as apprehensive and scared as the animals who want to eat the mouse. We learn for instance, that the gruffalo’s favourite foods are “owl ice cream”, and “scrambled snake”. But in fact we don’t feel frightened, and we don’t even believe him! My little friend was giggling as much as I was, because: “Silly old fox, doesn’t he know? There’s no such thing as a gruffalo!” “Silly old owl, doesn’t he know? There’s no such thing as a gruffalo!” And: “Silly old snake, doesn’t he know? There’s no such thing as a gruffalo!” We both had huge grins on our faces, until I turned the next page. Oh! There he was! As large as life and twice as ugly: “Oh help! Oh no! It’s a gruffalo!” And we clearly see a real, live, gruffalo! He seems to be half a grizzly bear and half a buffalo. And when he spots the mouse: “‘My favourite food’ the gruffalo said, ‘You’ll taste good on a slice of bread!’” But once again the mouse uses his quick wits and cunning. He boasts to the gruffalo that he, the mouse, is the scariest animal in the forest, and what’s more, he can prove it! The gruffalo is very doubtful of this, but humours the mouse, and accompanies him through the forest. Then the two of them once again encounter all the animals the mouse had met before. Not surprisingly, each creature is terrified by the sight of the mouse’s great “friend”, the gruffalo, whom he had described so perfectly earlier. Each one runs off in a panic, and gradually the gruffalo becomes more and more impressed with the mouse’s apparent toughness. When the mouse then claims that his favourite food is “gruffalo crumble”, it is the gruffalo who turns tail (quite literally, in his case) and flees, with a very very scared expression on his face. Then, in the final double spread: “All was quiet in the deep dark wood. The mouse found a nut and the nut was good.” The Gruffalo is a perfectly structured story, inviting the reader equally to laugh and have mock terror. Even the tiniest of tots love to be “frightened” in this way. Julia Donaldson seems to understand children completely, from the inside. She says that this story was inspired by a Chinese tale about a clever girl who tricks a hungry tiger into believing she is the Queen of the Jungle and scares him away. Julia Donaldson knew that this would make a great picture book for children between about three and seven years of age, but she wanted to do it in rhyme. She couldn’t think of anything to rhyme with “tiger”, so she created her own monster ending in “O”, to rhyme with “doesn’t he know?” She uses rhyming couplets, and includes much repetitive verse with just minor amusing tweaks, which delight the listener. We know what is coming, but each time there is a little thrill of surprise to make us laugh. The book is about 700 words long, and much of its charm also lies in the illustrations by Axel Scheffler. Once you’ve read it, it is impossible to imagine the gruffalo as anything else, but in fact he might have looked very different. “Our” monster is scary in a cute, dim-witted sort of way, but apparently Axel Scheffler’s first designs were of a monster who was far more frightening than the one we know. He also wondered about making the animals wear clothes, but in the end decided against it. My little Turkish neighbour, aged just four, and I both giggled (and one of us squealed a bit) at this delightful picture book. We haven’t yet ventured through our local “deep dark woods” though. Perhaps we should do that before we read the follow-up story, written five years later and called, The Gruffalo’s Child. After all, how terrifying might that one be?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    Foxes are supposed to be cunning, but it is the mouse who is cunning and manipulative. He or She manipulated all the predators fears against them to stay safe. That's pretty smart. I guess that's how you survive. I love that even the Gruffalo had fears. I guess being a mouse, the mouse has had to learn to live with fear. It's an amazing story about bravery and finding the weakness of scary looking, bigger obstacles in life. Find that fear and use it against you. Does the mouse offer a seminar? I Foxes are supposed to be cunning, but it is the mouse who is cunning and manipulative. He or She manipulated all the predators fears against them to stay safe. That's pretty smart. I guess that's how you survive. I love that even the Gruffalo had fears. I guess being a mouse, the mouse has had to learn to live with fear. It's an amazing story about bravery and finding the weakness of scary looking, bigger obstacles in life. Find that fear and use it against you. Does the mouse offer a seminar? I need to learn a thing or two from it. The kids enjoyed this. The nephew loved the gruffalo and the niece did too for different reasons. They both gave it 4 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    James

    Another delightful rhyming story from the pen of Julia Donaldson with brilliant accompanying illustrations by Axel Scheffler. Donaldson and Scheffler are a formidable team (although not quite rivalling that of Dahl and Blake) and this is undoubtedly one of their classics. The Gruffalo is a great character and creation loved by adults and children alike. Although well adapted for television and stage versions - nothing can compare to the original story and illustrations.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mischenko

    The Gruffalo, by Julia Donaldson is a cute rhyming story about a mouse and a gruffalo. We loved the combination of the sly little mouse and gullible gruffalo. "My favorite food!" the gruffalo said. "You'll taste good on a slice of bread!" "Good?" said the mouse. "Don't call me good! I'm the scariest creature in this deep dark wood. Just walk behind me and soon you'll see, everyone is afraid of me." The illustrations are detailed and interesting. Overall, its a charming little story children will en The Gruffalo, by Julia Donaldson is a cute rhyming story about a mouse and a gruffalo. We loved the combination of the sly little mouse and gullible gruffalo. "My favorite food!" the gruffalo said. "You'll taste good on a slice of bread!" "Good?" said the mouse. "Don't call me good! I'm the scariest creature in this deep dark wood. Just walk behind me and soon you'll see, everyone is afraid of me." The illustrations are detailed and interesting. Overall, its a charming little story children will enjoy. 4****

  7. 4 out of 5

    Zaynab Modaykhan

    This book tells the tale of a scary Gruffalo, is he real, is he pretend, nobody knows. A sly little mouse describes him so true, other animals listen intently, their ears fixed like glue. Through the deep dark woods does little mouse go, announcing his meeting with the fierce gruffalo. His aim is to put off predators leering in the woods, who all want to eat little mouse, they surely would. A fox comes along, thinking of his meal for the day, little mouse is quick to react, as he starts to say, "Those This book tells the tale of a scary Gruffalo, is he real, is he pretend, nobody knows. A sly little mouse describes him so true, other animals listen intently, their ears fixed like glue. Through the deep dark woods does little mouse go, announcing his meeting with the fierce gruffalo. His aim is to put off predators leering in the woods, who all want to eat little mouse, they surely would. A fox comes along, thinking of his meal for the day, little mouse is quick to react, as he starts to say, "Those terrible tusks, and terrible toes, with terrible teeth in his terrible jaws. He has knobbly knees and turn out toes, and a poisonous wart at the end of his nose. His eyes are orange, his tongue is black, he has purple prickles all over his back!" Little mouse uses his tricks to leer off owl and snake, proud of himself for thinking he’s invented a fake! Through the woods little mouse continues to go, unaware that round the corner stands the big Grufallo! As little mouse sees him, heartbeats he can feel, The Grufallo isn’t pretend, he is in fact real! Little mouse continues his tricks and uses the beast, to scare off the animals who wanted him for their feast. Little mouse sat alone, amazed at his luck, as he nibbles into a brown, delicious sweet nut.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Delightful! I've heard of this book, and my kids have seen the cartoon on Netflix, yet we hadn't read the book until recently, when my sister gave it to my youngest. We love Donaldson's Room on the Broom, and this is more of the same. Tight, elegant rhymes, a fun story, and great pictures. Now we need The Gruffalo's Child!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Have just bought this and all the toys to go with it for my little nephew. Hope he's going to like it as much as I did!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bettie☯

    Description: This is a rhyming story of a mouse and a monster. Little mouse goes for a walk in a dangerous forest. To scare off his enemies he invents tales of a fantastical creature called the Gruffalo. So imagine his surprise when he meets the real Gruffalo. 4* The Stick Man 5* The Gruffalo

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sophia Triad

    This is a totally awesome book. My children read it at school and they really loved it. And of course we bought the book and we saw the movie. And then we read the book again again and again :-) It is a clever story about a little mouse and a scary (not really) monster, the Gruffalo. The intelligent sourceful little mouse manipulated the bigger animals who wanted to eat him. He made them think that he is scarier than Gruffalo. Thus, he should not be eaten. The little mouse though that Gruffalo is a This is a totally awesome book. My children read it at school and they really loved it. And of course we bought the book and we saw the movie. And then we read the book again again and again :-) It is a clever story about a little mouse and a scary (not really) monster, the Gruffalo. The intelligent sourceful little mouse manipulated the bigger animals who wanted to eat him. He made them think that he is scarier than Gruffalo. Thus, he should not be eaten. The little mouse though that Gruffalo is a made up monster, but he was wrong. Surprise!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Evelina | AvalinahsBooks

    This is a wonderful book for kids! I loved the illustrations, and the story is so smart. Would make a great gift or a nice first book to someone who's just learning how to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    آیت معروفی

    اولین بار انیمیشنش را دیدم. انیمیشن کوتاهی بود. داستان به نظرم حیرت انگیز بود. داستان را شب برای پسرم از حفظ گفتم. قدم به قدم. همانطوری که توی انیمیشن دیده بودم. پلک نمی زد. وقتی موش قصه به گروفالوی خیالی رسید داشت سکته می کرد:) وقتی دیدم کانون ترجمهاش کرده خریدمش. پریشبها برایش خواندم و جالب اینکه هنوز برایش هیجان انگیز بود. تجربهی خنده و تعجب و کمی ترس را همزمان به بچهها دادن کار سختی است. از موج کتابها و اسباب بازیها و کارتها و چیزهای دیگری که توی وب در موردش هست معلومه که محبوب بچههاست. اولین بار انیمیشنش را دیدم. انیمیشن کوتاهی بود. داستان به نظرم حیرت انگیز بود. داستان را شب برای پسرم از حفظ گفتم. قدم به قدم. همانطوری که توی انیمیشن دیده بودم. پلک نمی زد. وقتی موش قصه به گروفالوی خیالی رسید داشت سکته می کرد:) وقتی دیدم کانون ترجمه‌اش کرده خریدمش. پریشب‌ها برایش خواندم و جالب این‌که هنوز برایش هیجان انگیز بود. تجربه‌ی خنده و تعجب و کمی ترس را همزمان به بچه‌ها دادن کار سختی است. از موج کتاب‌ها و اسباب بازی‌ها و کارت‌ها و چیزهای دیگری که توی وب در موردش هست معلومه که محبوب بچه‌هاست.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anahita

    Ha ha ha. It was really great. this is my new favorite children’s book. :D

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Despite the lead character a rather scary looking monster, this is a fun bedtime read geared at younger children. The story is told through rhyme, as we meet various animals who cross paths with the giant Gruffalo. With beautifully unique illustrations, this is a perfect gift for young readers.

  16. 5 out of 5

    نسرين غندورة

    قصة طريفة عن فأر ذكي. استطاع أن يتغلب على كل الحيونات التي حاولت افتراسه بحيله الذكية. أجمل ما في القصة أنها تشجع الأطفال على حل المشاكل بطرق مبتكرة بدلا من الهروب منها.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clouds

    Popular kids books are powerful vehicles of merchandise. Take The Hungry Caterpillar (as just one example) - you can buy the book, the cardboard book, the cloth book, the colouring book, the pop-up book, the touch-and-feel book, the finger-puppet book, the audio book, the baby 'development toy', the plushy toy, the 'big apple' toy, the play floor tiles, the bedspread, the toothbrush, the body-wash, the bubble-bath, the playroom stickers, the height chart, the calendar, the garden water toy, the Popular kids books are powerful vehicles of merchandise. Take The Hungry Caterpillar (as just one example) - you can buy the book, the cardboard book, the cloth book, the colouring book, the pop-up book, the touch-and-feel book, the finger-puppet book, the audio book, the baby 'development toy', the plushy toy, the 'big apple' toy, the play floor tiles, the bedspread, the toothbrush, the body-wash, the bubble-bath, the playroom stickers, the height chart, the calendar, the garden water toy, the memory game, the seat-belt strap covers, the baby vests, the kids t-shirts, the welly-boots, the backpack, the lunchbox, the pencil case... that's just off the top of my head - I'm sure there's more! I remember that book from my own childhood, and I don't find this grating - it's sweet, it's unisex, the art style is lush and I don't mind seeing it splashed around. But I was 15 when The Gruffalo was published... listening to Rage Against The Machine and lamenting the over-commercialised tat we peddle to our children... To my teenage self, The Gruffalo was just another hook to get parents buying their kids more crap: a symbol of a broken system. Obviously, I never read it - but I was aware there was a TV adaptation made (with much fanfare) and a sequel book, etc. The Gruffalo has become a 'standard' (one of those books every kid should have...) and I was surprised to find how much I liked it! The rhythm and rhyme is perfect - it's heavily structured, but flows naturally, so even the most stilted beadtime-story reader is guided smoothly into a sing-song cadence. The story itself is clever and fun. The art style is very modern and clean - a touch generic for me (which is why it doesn't get 5 stars) - but overall The Gruffalo is a great bedtime story, and certainly one of Fin's favourites. We have the paperback and the noisy-hardback - the one where you press the buttons for Gruffalo's growl, or Owl's hoot, etc. We also have a Gruffalo flannel... but aside from that we've avoided any more of the merch! We also have many of Donaldson & Scheffler's other books - and I'm pleased to say that they're consistently good. The Gruffalo's Child, Room on the Broom, The Smartest Giant in Town, A Squash and a Squeeze, Charlie Cook's Favourite Book, and Superworm all have my little boy's seal of approval. After this I read: The Gruffalo's Child

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mehzabein

    Julia Donaldson does an excellent job on writing this creative story book. The first time I read the story, I initially felt it was a very long read for children as I thought it was long myself and repetitive but upon reading it a second, third time, I realised I had not fully appreciated how good the storybook was. Complete with rhyme and repitition it captured my attention and the children to whom I was reading to. The use of animals was a good idea as children were able to point out different Julia Donaldson does an excellent job on writing this creative story book. The first time I read the story, I initially felt it was a very long read for children as I thought it was long myself and repetitive but upon reading it a second, third time, I realised I had not fully appreciated how good the storybook was. Complete with rhyme and repitition it captured my attention and the children to whom I was reading to. The use of animals was a good idea as children were able to point out different animals that they came accross throughout the book, creating a sense of excitement. Use of synonyms such as 'Big and little' help children to begin to understand opposites of words, a good literacy aspect of children's learning. Ideally, the book is for 3-7 year olds, but is enjoyed by many, a good must have within any home or classroom.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Hill

    I hadn't read this book since my childhood, loved it! Great opportunities to look at rhyme and rhythm with children. The repetitive line of 'there's no such thing as Gruffalo' would be lovely for EAL children to join in too. You could also explore Donaldson's use of alliteration with children. Children could create more animals for the mouse to meet and their own rhymes for them. In science, children could look at the different habitats in which the animals live in. Good morals about not having t I hadn't read this book since my childhood, loved it! Great opportunities to look at rhyme and rhythm with children. The repetitive line of 'there's no such thing as Gruffalo' would be lovely for EAL children to join in too. You could also explore Donaldson's use of alliteration with children. Children could create more animals for the mouse to meet and their own rhymes for them. In science, children could look at the different habitats in which the animals live in. Good morals about not having to be the biggest to be the best. That you shouldn't judge from what you see, as the Gruffalo wasn't scary. Also not to believe everything you hear.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rana Heshmati

    شاید بیربط باشه، اما این کتاب من رو یاد یک ترس بزرگم انداخت. اکثر اوقات فانتزی میسازم. به زبان دیگه، توهم میزنم و هی با خودم فکر میکنم. بعد هی میگم، نه واقعی نیست. واقعی نیست. فکرای توست. و ترس اینکه واقعا به واقعیت بپیوندن،... شاید بی‌ربط باشه، اما این کتاب من رو یاد یک ترس بزرگم انداخت. اکثر اوقات فانتزی می‌سازم. به زبان دیگه، توهم می‌زنم و هی با خودم فکر می‌کنم. بعد هی می‌‌گم، نه واقعی نیست. واقعی نیست. فکرای توست. و ترس اینکه واقعا به واقعیت بپیوندن،...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    A wonderful tale and movie about dealing with bullies. A must for kids!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Hands down the best childrens book - I loved reading it to my son as well as the other books by her. He's getting older now so I cant read it as much :(

  23. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    Read 18/01/17

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    A tiny mouse uses his wits to avoid becoming someone's lunch and in doing so, becomes king of the deep, dark forest. ADORABLE!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ahmet Barut

    The Gruffalo, by Julia Donaldson The Gruffalo is about a cheeky and confident little mouse who defends himself from an array of predators, whilst walking through ‘a deep dark wood’. He defends himself through words rather than violence. He does this by outsmarting the naïve predators by claiming that he is about to meet a ‘Gruffalo’, a mythical beast. The mouse frightens the predators by giving them vivid descriptions of the beast - ironically, the mouse does meet the 'Gruffalo', and outwits him The Gruffalo, by Julia Donaldson The Gruffalo is about a cheeky and confident little mouse who defends himself from an array of predators, whilst walking through ‘a deep dark wood’. He defends himself through words rather than violence. He does this by outsmarting the naïve predators by claiming that he is about to meet a ‘Gruffalo’, a mythical beast. The mouse frightens the predators by giving them vivid descriptions of the beast - ironically, the mouse does meet the 'Gruffalo', and outwits him too. Overall, this is a very enjoyable children’s tale with an exciting setting and great introductions to various characters. The various animal characters help children identify with different types of animals that could be in a forest. The use of ‘deep dark wood’ to describe the forest works very well, as it sets the scene and makes the reader excited about what there is to come. The dialogue between characters is very clever and the rhyming is well done. It creates a rhythm for the story and makes you want to read on. The descriptions of the 'Gruffalo' stimulates one’s imagination and the concept of meeting the 'Gruffalo' becomes very exciting. The illustrations are fantastic and capture the essence of the story. The consistent story works very well, especially with an anti-climatic ending where the mouse remains superior. Every part of the story is great, but the witty and clever character of the mouse is definitely the main highlight. I would say that this book is aimed at 3 to 6 year olds and can also be enjoyed by older children. The story could be used in the classroom by interacting with the visuals of the book. The teacher can ask questions about what the animals are called or if the children can spot the ‘Gruffalo’ anywhere in the detailed illustrations of the ‘deep dark wood’. The repetition and rhyming theme of the book would make it very enjoyable for children and would help them understand what could happen next in the story. This story could support a lesson in literacy and a topic of rhyming poems and using rhyme in creative writing and story telling.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    In the big dark woods, a mouse is going for a walk when he meets a fox that, thinking the mouse looks like a good meal, tries to lure him back to his den. The mouse is an intelligent little thing, and explains to the fox that he can't come because he's having lunch with a gruffalo. The fox has never heard of a gruffalo before, so the mouse starts to describe a terrible monster who likes to eat roasted fox. The fox, terrified, runs away. The mouse is molested by an owl next, and then a snake, and In the big dark woods, a mouse is going for a walk when he meets a fox that, thinking the mouse looks like a good meal, tries to lure him back to his den. The mouse is an intelligent little thing, and explains to the fox that he can't come because he's having lunch with a gruffalo. The fox has never heard of a gruffalo before, so the mouse starts to describe a terrible monster who likes to eat roasted fox. The fox, terrified, runs away. The mouse is molested by an owl next, and then a snake, and each time he tricks the animals into thinking there's a bigger, badder beast in the woods than they. Until the mouse meets an actual gruffalo, just as he described it, and the gruffalo wants to eat him too. But he's still got some tricks up his sleeve, does mouse! This is an absolutely wonderful story that I've read to my 2 month old baby several times already - he has no idea what's going on of course but the pictures grab his attention and I can do silly voices that make him grin and squeal; the word "gruffalo" seems to delight him and the cadence of the rhyming text does too. I can't wait till he's older and can actually enjoy the story of the clever little mouse who outwits the bigger, stronger animals of the woods - great lesson in that, but also lots of fun!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Coman

    The Gruffalo is a children’s book by author Julia Donaldson. It tells the story of a mouse’s walk in the woods. On his walk the mouse encounters any dangerous animals such as a snake, a fox and an owl. Each animal he meets invites them back to their house where they clearly intend to eat him. The mouse is very cunning and he declines each animals invitation by telling them that he is going for dinner at his friend, the Gruffalo’s house. He tells each animal that they are the Gruffalo’s favourite The Gruffalo is a children’s book by author Julia Donaldson. It tells the story of a mouse’s walk in the woods. On his walk the mouse encounters any dangerous animals such as a snake, a fox and an owl. Each animal he meets invites them back to their house where they clearly intend to eat him. The mouse is very cunning and he declines each animals invitation by telling them that he is going for dinner at his friend, the Gruffalo’s house. He tells each animal that they are the Gruffalo’s favourite food and describes his frightening features to them. This allows the mouse to continue safely on his walk through the forest. The story then turns when the mouse meets a real Gruffalo. He tells the Gruffalo that he is the most fearsome animal in the forest and shows him by walking back through the forest where all the earlier animals run in fear away. This in turn scares the Gruffalo away from the mouse. This is one of the most popular children’s books around. The humour in it and the easy to follow story with the rhymes make it a much loved book for children. It can be easily used to tell a class story which can be then transformed into roleplay, hot seating etc.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Taiba Hussain

    I first came across the Gruffalo when BBC3 pretty much kept it on replay. I then decided to buy the book for my niece and found that its far far better in comparison to the film version. What enhanced the qualities of the book even more was the fact that it had sounds! This meant that my niece could not only listen to me read, but join in by associating the correct sound with the right animal. The book is very bright with lovely illustrations thus making it even more appealing (even without havi I first came across the Gruffalo when BBC3 pretty much kept it on replay. I then decided to buy the book for my niece and found that its far far better in comparison to the film version. What enhanced the qualities of the book even more was the fact that it had sounds! This meant that my niece could not only listen to me read, but join in by associating the correct sound with the right animal. The book is very bright with lovely illustrations thus making it even more appealing (even without having read the words yet). The story revolves predominately around a mouse and his trek through the woods. He bumps into some intimidating animals and realises that his imagination (of a made up ‘monster’) will serve him well. Unbeknown to the little mouse, this fictional monster does exist! But true to form, the little mouse manages to conjure up a plan that will aide his survival back through the woods. A great story for children to re-enact and create a colourful wall display. I love how this book can be read over and over, yet the excitement remains!!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nwakaego Dee

    This book is about a mouse who took a stroll into the woods, along his way he scares a fox, an owl and a snake by telling them the story of the gruffalo who eats them for dinner. The mouse then runs into the gruffalo and he is hungry for mice. The mouse advised the gruffalo that everyone is afraid of him and that the gruffalo should be scared. To prove himself he advised the gruffalo to follow him behind, as they walk through the woods they come across the fox, the owl and the snake who run away This book is about a mouse who took a stroll into the woods, along his way he scares a fox, an owl and a snake by telling them the story of the gruffalo who eats them for dinner. The mouse then runs into the gruffalo and he is hungry for mice. The mouse advised the gruffalo that everyone is afraid of him and that the gruffalo should be scared. To prove himself he advised the gruffalo to follow him behind, as they walk through the woods they come across the fox, the owl and the snake who run away when they see the gruffalo although the gruffalo believes they are running from the mouse as he is the most scariest creature in the woods. I enjoyed this book, especially reading it to my reception class. The author had put in some sentences to rhyme and also repeating pattern of phrases. Great illustration and very captivating. Book gives humour especially the part when the mouse persuades the gruffalo that all the other creatures are running from him when really they are scared of the gruffalo. This book is fantastic for story time and I recommend for reception and Year 1.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Campling

    I really enjoyed reading this beautifully illustrated story, in which a small mouse escapes the clutches of woodland creatures Fox, Owl and Snake by outsmarting them his imagination and creativity (a classic case of how brain can overcome brawn). Mouse creates the story of a hideous and fierce 'Gruffalo' unawares to him that such creature actually exists, ‘Silly old snake doesn't he know there is no such thing as a Gruffalo'. On encountering the hideous creature himself, Mouse successfully convin I really enjoyed reading this beautifully illustrated story, in which a small mouse escapes the clutches of woodland creatures Fox, Owl and Snake by outsmarting them his imagination and creativity (a classic case of how brain can overcome brawn). Mouse creates the story of a hideous and fierce 'Gruffalo' unawares to him that such creature actually exists, ‘Silly old snake doesn't he know there is no such thing as a Gruffalo'. On encountering the hideous creature himself, Mouse successfully convinces the Gruffalo that he, Mouse, is the scariest creature around! I found this story quite humorous in places, and found that it's rhyming verses and repetition was ideal to allow children to easily join in. Having educational elements within the story I'd say that this book is suitable for young children. However, having read and enjoyed the book so much myself, it's clear this story is suitable for all ages.

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