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The Outsiders Active Reading Guide PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Outsiders Active Reading Guide
Author: S.E. Hinton
Publisher: Published 1994 by Sundance (first published 1967)
ISBN: 156801869X
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The Outsiders is about two weeks in the life of a 14-year-old boy. The novel tells the story of Ponyboy Curtis and his struggles with right and wrong in a society in which he believes that he is an outsider. According to Ponyboy, there are two kinds of people in the world: greasers and socs. A soc (short for "social") has money, can get away with just about anything, and h The Outsiders is about two weeks in the life of a 14-year-old boy. The novel tells the story of Ponyboy Curtis and his struggles with right and wrong in a society in which he believes that he is an outsider. According to Ponyboy, there are two kinds of people in the world: greasers and socs. A soc (short for "social") has money, can get away with just about anything, and has an attitude longer than a limousine. A greaser, on the other hand, always lives on the outside and needs to watch his back. Ponyboy is a greaser, and he's always been proud of it, even willing to rumble against a gang of socs for the sake of his fellow greasers--until one terrible night when his friend Johnny kills a soc. The murder gets under Ponyboy's skin, causing his bifurcated world to crumble and teaching him that pain feels the same whether a soc or a greaser.

30 review for The Outsiders Active Reading Guide

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Stay gold, Ponyboy...Stay gold... *cries in Spanish*

  2. 4 out of 5

    karen

    the outsiders is a book about a group of youthful greasers living in oklahoma, and about their struggles to exist in a society that seems designed to dismiss them. oklahoma is also the name of a popular musical. draw your own conclusions, or continue reading. see, i don't know from oklahoma in the sixties. maybe that is a place where street toughs call their little brothers "honey" and "baby" and enjoy sunsets and stars and reading margaret mitchell aloud to one another and who recite robert frost the outsiders is a book about a group of youthful greasers living in oklahoma, and about their struggles to exist in a society that seems designed to dismiss them. oklahoma is also the name of a popular musical. draw your own conclusions, or continue reading. see, i don't know from oklahoma in the sixties. maybe that is a place where street toughs call their little brothers "honey" and "baby" and enjoy sunsets and stars and reading margaret mitchell aloud to one another and who recite robert frost in quiet moments. maybe they do gymnastics before what they call "skin fighting" with the local rival boys. maybe they cry and snuggle together in bed at night and hold each other through hard times. not that there is anything wrong with that. it just seems to be queer behavior for a gang of juvenile delinquents. what?? no, i didn't mean queer like that. no, really, i just meant odd. but, now that you mention it. huh. yeah, it does seem a little queer. who knew that boys in leather could have a queer connotation?? and putting on tight t-shirts that show off every muscle before they go to meet the other boys? and making sure to fix their hair?? no, that's just what it says. in the book. these are their modern-day equivalents maybe this is just what happens when a teen girl writes this kind of material, tomboy or not. i had seen the movie before, so i knew it was about pretty boys fighting, but there is a lot more at work here, subtextually. i have also seen rumble fish, which is an awful movie based on another hinton book that is even more... musical, but is an excuse to look at this: and how is tom waits in both movies? but all of that is just me giggling. what is more interesting, from a serious literary perspective is just an observation from reading this, the pigman, and revisiting the chocolate war and catcher in the rye for this portion of my young adult readers' advisory class which will meet this tuesday where we will discuss the "classics" of teen fiction. (and i know catcher wasn't specifically produced for a teen audience, but it is on the damn syllabus and if it makes you happier, i will call this "the teen in literature" instead) in the fifties and sixties, there was seemingly more free-floating apprehension and fear: the a-bomb, the draft, various factors contributed to this fear of an imminent death beyond anyone's control. all this anxiety and fear of the establishment created a more pronounced sense of "us" and "them" that i think i blabbed on a little in the pigman review, but children were just treated like smaller adults, really. and the literature reflects this. all of these books seem to emphasize a value placed on the preservation of childhood innocence - staying gold, protecting a younger sister from the taint of phoniness, encouraging kids to act like kids and roller skate through the house and disregard the parental restrictions in this one safe place... now, the boundaries are blurrier - girls are getting their periods at 8, and grown men in suits are playing video games on the subway. the distinctions are less clear. and a lot of teen fiction today is more escapist in nature, less didactic. teens don't need to be told to value their childhood anymore because, don't worry, it will never end. peter pan FTW!! this all means nothing, except it is something i noticed. sorry for blabbing on...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Ronan ♥ Herondale ♥

    ”Sixteen years on the streets and you can learn a lot. But all the wrong things, not the things you want to learn. Sixteen years on the streets and you see a lot. But all the wrong sights, not the sights you want to see.” So this was my first time reading “The Outsiders” and I really don’t get why our teachers never forced us to read THIS book at school! I’m convinced my teenage me wouldn’t only have approved but also would have enjoyed it immensely and I’m kinda sad I had to discover this book s ”Sixteen years on the streets and you can learn a lot. But all the wrong things, not the things you want to learn. Sixteen years on the streets and you see a lot. But all the wrong sights, not the sights you want to see.” So this was my first time reading “The Outsiders” and I really don’t get why our teachers never forced us to read THIS book at school! I’m convinced my teenage me wouldn’t only have approved but also would have enjoyed it immensely and I’m kinda sad I had to discover this book so late. Well, my school system obviously failed but that definitely didn’t stop me from reading “The Outsiders” and I’m very glad about it. Soda threw one arm across my neck. He mumbled something drowsily. “Listen, kiddo, when Darry hollers at you … he doesn’t mean nothin’. He’s just got more worries than somebody his age ought to.” I swear the moment I read about the interactions and relationships between those boys I was already hooked! It felt like reading “The Raven Boys” all over again; just a couple of years earlier, with other troubles and with a smaller book size. XD I mean alone the fact that Ponyboy and Soda were sleeping together in a bed! Their brotherly relationship was so nice to read! Those brothers cared about each other and their friends and they would have done almost everything in order to help them! <3 He was stroking my hair and I could hear the sobs racking him as he fought to keep back the tears. “Oh, Pony, I thought we’d lost you … like we did Mom and Dad …” That was his silent fear then – of losing another person he loved. Darry, the oldest of those three brothers, broke my heart as well. I mean their parents were dead and he had to look after his two younger brothers. I can’t even imagine how much strength it takes to take care of your brothers at such a young age, but he still did it and was even successful. He got a job and looked after them and this alone makes him a hero in my eyes. Who knows; if Johnny and Dallas would have had such family ties they probably would have never even ended up where they did in the end. >_< Johnny… that poor little boy! He didn’t deserve what happened to him and it’s no wonder he was so jumpy after the “Socs” almost beat him to death. I’m right there with Ponyboy when he says that it’s not fair that they were jumped for being “Greasers”. It wasn’t fair for the Socs to have everything. We were as good as they were; it wasn’t our fault we were greasers. I couldn’t just take it or leave it, like Two-Bit, or ignore it and love life anyway, like Sodapop, or harden myself beyond caring, like Dally, or actually enjoy it, like Tim Shepard. I felt the tension growing inside of me and I knew something had to happen or I would explode. “ The interesting thing about this book is that it acknowledges the fact that the “Socs” fight the “Greasers” because they think they are lowlives, but that none of those two parties actually wants to do anything against it. They accept this injustice, it’s just a part of their life and they all act like they are supposed to fight because it’s only natural. The only three people who truly question their situation are Pony, Johnny and Randy. In one way or the other they are all tired of fighting and try their best to get out of that vicious cycle – some more effective than others. >_< ”Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold …” Oh my, that line killed me big time! T_T I had a lot of mixed feelings about that ending and I could relate to Ponyboy so much. He was confused, he knew what they had been doing wasn’t right, that the fighting didn’t get them anywhere; that his friend was in trouble because he had done something right and something awfully wrong and that sooner or later he would have to pay for it. I think this book is such a damn good example for humanity. It points out that good people are able to do horrible things and that seemingly bad people aren’t always as bad as they seem to appear. They have their problems and troubles too and there is always a reason why they leash out at others, why they act in a certain way. ”We’re all we’ve got left. We ought to be able to stick together against everything. If we don’t have each other we don’t have anything. If you don’t have anything, you end up like Dallas …” They are all human, whether it are “Socs” or “Greasers”, they all just want to live their lives, they want to be happy and accepted for who they are and in the end they actually aren’t as different as they seem to be. It’s an epiphany us readers experience while we read this book, but it’s a lesson not all of the characters learn. >_< To say it with Martin Luther King Jr. words: “Hate begets hate; violence begets violence; toughness begets a greater toughness.” And I think this quote describes the book more than just well. The ending made me sad, because there’s only one way this could have ended and it was exactly the way I expected it to be. Not all of it, but most of it anyway. Conclusion: If you haven’t read “The Outsiders” yet, you definitely should give it a try! It’s a great book which teaches an important lesson and I can recommend it to everyone. This book will make you think and feel and it will continue to do so even after you finished reading the last page. ;-)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I have watched this movie over and over when I was younger and I still have it today and love it just as much. I will admit I was in love with Dallas and had a crush on Sodapop but Dallas was my man =) I just can't believe it took me this many years to read the book! And the book was so close to the movie it is almost unreal. Maybe it was due to the fact that S.E. Hinton was on set helping with the movie, I really don't know. I just love that I can read a book and watch a movie and there not be t I have watched this movie over and over when I was younger and I still have it today and love it just as much. I will admit I was in love with Dallas and had a crush on Sodapop but Dallas was my man =) I just can't believe it took me this many years to read the book! And the book was so close to the movie it is almost unreal. Maybe it was due to the fact that S.E. Hinton was on set helping with the movie, I really don't know. I just love that I can read a book and watch a movie and there not be that many things different. Ok, there will be . . . . This is a remarkable story of people from different sides of the tracks. The greasers (the poor boys and some girls) and the socs (the rich kids) This story is told from the greasers side which is awesome because I really don't care about the socs! These boys all looked out for each other in the best ways they could. Even if they were dirt poor, they did what they could for each other. They had fun times getting in rumbles with the socs, most all of them loved to fight. It was like getting set loose in a candy store. Most of the beginning of the story revolves around Ponyboy and Johnny. They are the best of friends and poor Johnny seems to have it bad no matter which way he turns. His parents treat him bad, he sleeps outside most of the time and he got a very bad beating from the socs. That's what they do, cruise around and find a greaser or two alone and gang up on them. They damn near beat Johnny to death and all of the other friends always rally around him and try to protect him from things. Until one tragic night Ponyboy and Johnny get attacked by a group of socs AGAIN, but this time Johnny stabs and kills the jerk that beat him so bad before. They were trying to drown Ponyboy. They have to run to Dallas to help get them out of town. Because that's what friends do, they hang out and help each other if they are in trouble. Dallas tells Ponyboy and Johnny to hop on this train and go to a town and stay in an abandoned church until things die down and he would come up there. He gives them money and a gun. Johnny buys them food and hair dye for Ponyboy (which he hates) and he also gets "Gone With The Wind" for Ponyboy because he has always wanted to read it. I thought that was so nice of him and he picked a really great book. Ponyboy spent time reading the book to his friend when they weren't playing cards to pass the time. At one point Dallas shows up and tells them some things and takes them out to eat. The boys decide they are going to turn themselves in but when they get back to the church, it's on fire and there are a couple of people and a bunch of children huddled around it. When the boys get there they find out some of the kids are inside and Ponyboy and Johnny (being the good guys that they are) go in after them. Of course Dallas is yelling for them to get back out! Needless to say they get the kids to safety but Dallas and Ponyboy get a little hurt in the process. Johnny gets messed up bad. It's always Johnny! He always just wanted to be normal for shite's sake! The people thought they were heroes which is truly what they were. "We think the towheaded kid is going to be all right. He burned one arm pretty badly, though, trying to drag the other kid out the window. Johnny, well I don't know about him. A piece of timber caught him across the back--he might have a broken back, and he was burned pretty severely. He passed out before he got out the window. They're giving him plasma now." He must have seen the look on my face because he hurriedly changed the subject. "I swear, you three are the bravest kids I've seen in a long time. First you and the black-haired kid climbing in that window, and then the tough-looking kid going back to save him. Mrs. O'Briant and I think you were sent straight from heaven. Or are you just professional heroes or something?" Sent from heaven? Had he gotten a good look at Dallas? "No, we're greasers," I said. I was too worried and scared to appreciate the fact that he was trying to be funny. Johnny isn't doing so well in the hospital and Dallas and Ponyboy are really afraid for him. Dallas breaks out of the hospital on the night of the rumble to fight for Johnny. He was so happy after the fight that he grabbed Ponyboy and rushed back to the hospital to tell Johnny they had won. Even though, they didn't know it at the time, they got to spend the last few minutes with Johnny before he died. It was so sad, I cried a river. I knew what was going to happen but it doesn't matter, I cried the river. Dallas goes nuts of course and runs off. Ponyboy is in a daze when he gets home and tells everyone that Johnny is dead and that Dallas ran off. They are all sad of course and worried what Dallas is going to do. And then they get the call that Dallas robbed a store and the police are after him so they go to meet up with him. But when they get to him the stupid cops killed him. And I think he wanted that really because he pulled an unloaded gun on them. Maybe it's just my thoughts but I feel like he called the guys because he did want to live in a way but he was so messed up with Johnny dying after all that poor kid had been through, that he wanted to die himself. Of course I cried and cried at that as well. So, Ponyboy is trying to cope with two of his friends dying in one night. He doesn't do very well and is sick for quite some time. This book really made me have some feels. Like I said before I have watched the movie a million times but as an adult, reading the book put more things into perspective. This is the second book that I have read lately that has made me want to change some things in my life. At least some of the things that I can and that is one of the many things I love about reading. ♥ MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List Read 2016 * 2018

  5. 4 out of 5

    unknown

    Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold. *********** The Outsiders is a book about sensitive teenage boys who alternately get into gang fights, hug one another, and burst into tears. They also spend more time than you might expect ruminating on how the tightness of a t-shirt might enhance the rippling musculature of a steely-eyed fellow gang member (this is where Stephanie Meyer got the idea for how to characterize Edward). Even though they're always complimenting each other's hair and doing gymnastics, it' Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold. *********** The Outsiders is a book about sensitive teenage boys who alternately get into gang fights, hug one another, and burst into tears. They also spend more time than you might expect ruminating on how the tightness of a t-shirt might enhance the rippling musculature of a steely-eyed fellow gang member (this is where Stephanie Meyer got the idea for how to characterize Edward). Even though they're always complimenting each other's hair and doing gymnastics, it's not gay at all because it takes place in 1965, shortly after James Dean had made crying and homoerotic tension cool. This is the kind of book that teachers like to assign to 7th graders (or dumb high schoolers) because it offers up a lot of THEMES about how EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT BUT STILL THE SAME, and teachers feel pretty safe giving a quiz on that because even the stupidest kid can figure it out, as every few paragraphs the narrator will just go ahead and state it outright, like this: "Even though we're Greasers and they're Socs, I guess in the end, we all look at the same sunset." (Sample essay question: What did Ponyboy mean when he said that everyone looked at the same sunset? And all you have to do to get it right is repeat the first half of the sentence.) As a narrator, Ponyboy kept reminding me of Holden Caulfied, if Holden was poor and actually managed to do anything interesting with his evenings. But maybe that just has to do with the time period and the fact that they both say stuff like "I was just about bawling my eyes out, to tell you the truth" every few pages, except Ponyboy is doing it because his best friend knifed someone and then died of a broken back and being on fire, and Holden is just sad because his roommate smells bad (oh and I guess his brother got cancer and died pffffft). I do think they would get along if they ever met, and maybe make out a little bit. I love the last few sentences of every chapter, where SE Hinton trots out her corniest stuff. Chapter 7: "Socs were just guys after all. Things were rough all over, but it was better that way. That way you could tell the other guy was human too." Chapter 8: "'Thanks, Ponyboy.' She smiled through her tears. 'You dig okay.' She had green eyes. I went on, walking home slowly." Oh and it doesn't come at the end of a chapter but: "Not even the rattling of the train could keep me awake, and I went to sleep in a hoodlum's jacket, with a gun lying next to my hand." There's also the best deathbed speech in all of teen literature (probably), which goes like this: "INTERPRETS THEMATICALLY RELEVANT POEM" (DIES). So somehow I never read this in middle school, and when I read it now, I just end up giggling at half of the overwrought emotion (which happened with Catcher in the Rye too, but there I'm going to assume Salinger was writing on multiple levels, because he was a competent adult, whereas The Outsiders was written by someone Holden's age). But it's still a pretty awesome book. EDITED to add that this Penguin edition makes the book seem really classy, which is nice, but Jodi Picoult's introduction is kind of a joke. She basically asked her 14-year-old son to write a book report and quoted excerpts. Facebook 30 Day Book Challenge Day 6: Favorite young adult book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Finally read this classic. Glad to be in the know! I can see why this has stood the test of time. The story is easy to get into and keeps your attention throughout. It seems like any person, young or old, rich or poor, popular or outcast could empathize or sympathize the themes. Finally, the key climax points are done very well and hit you right in the feels! Another thought I had while reading is this is another one of the young adult fore fathers. We now take for granted that every week there wi Finally read this classic. Glad to be in the know! I can see why this has stood the test of time. The story is easy to get into and keeps your attention throughout. It seems like any person, young or old, rich or poor, popular or outcast could empathize or sympathize the themes. Finally, the key climax points are done very well and hit you right in the feels! Another thought I had while reading is this is another one of the young adult fore fathers. We now take for granted that every week there will be 10 new YA titles to pique our interest. Back when this came out, the YA gems were few and far between. Reading this should be a right of passage for YA fans everywhere.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Briynne

    I'm a little horrified at myself for not having this book up before now. We had a discussion about it in class today, and I had to write this as soon it was over. I wish there were more stars to give The Outsiders, but five will have to do. I love this book, and have loved it faithfully since I read it in sixth grade - I must have read it a dozen times, and possibly more. I can quote long sections of the book. I was obsessed, and to some degree still am. It's not a good book by any literary stan I'm a little horrified at myself for not having this book up before now. We had a discussion about it in class today, and I had to write this as soon it was over. I wish there were more stars to give The Outsiders, but five will have to do. I love this book, and have loved it faithfully since I read it in sixth grade - I must have read it a dozen times, and possibly more. I can quote long sections of the book. I was obsessed, and to some degree still am. It's not a good book by any literary standard, really. Hinton uses one of those usually awful formulaic introductions that devotes a paragraph to each main character, explicitly describing their characteristics, history, and appearance. When I think of it objectively, it's almost as bad as that awful, awful introductory second chapter of the Babysitters Club books that repeats in every installment. I think the point is, though, that I just don't care. In fact, I adore the writing even though it is obvious. Maybe because I first read it when I was eleven and that sort of writing just seemed clear and to-the-point. At any rate, I don't think it suffers too badly from the style, and if anything it benefits from the authenticity of a teenage author. I can't even begin to say what it was about this book that caught my interest and imagination so completely. I liked the otherness of it - I had never experienced anything like these boys dealt with. Not the pervasive fear and violence, not the absentee, non-existent, or abusive parents, and definitely not the fascinating siege-mentality camaraderie that existed in their group. The best part of the book, without any doubt, is the characters she has created. I love them all, with the exception of Steve. They are wonderful and so sympathetic, with their odd names and ill-fated lives. I hope for the ending to change every time I read it. Ponyboy's voice, which narrates the story, has a beautiful vulnerability and honesty that makes the story believable. He's often confused, hurt, scared, sorry, and just feels like things are wrong; but, he's also brave and kind and takes chances on people. I think that Hinton's allowing her main character to be a real person, who is more often than not unsure of everything he does, gives the book its credibility with teenagers. Fantastic, must-read, childhood-defining book. Reading Hinton's "That Was Then, This is Now" is worth it just for the few brief cameos a slightly older Ponyboy makes throughout the story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I loved The Outsiders when I read it as a teen and again when I read it just a few months ago. S. E. Hinton created a believable and engaging cast of characters who struggle with conflict in and out of their gang and learn the meaning of friendship and family. A very moving and enjoyable story!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    I'm just feeling a lot of emotions right now don't toUCH ME. I barely remembered anything about this book from reading it in high school but oh man it was definitely better than I remember. Even though I've never been in any of the situations referenced in the outsiders, the overall themes are meaningful and easy to grasp. REAL GOOD REAL GOOD.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    This was a great book but I was incredibly disappointed after I found out it wasn't about aliens.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “Nature’s first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf’s a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay.” Last week my son came home from school and informed me he had a homework assignment about the book his class is reading as a group. Said child was forlorn that he would be unable to complete the assignment as the editions of the bo Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “Nature’s first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf’s a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay.” Last week my son came home from school and informed me he had a homework assignment about the book his class is reading as a group. Said child was forlorn that he would be unable to complete the assignment as the editions of the book were for “class use only” and were not permitted to be taken home. “Never you fear,” I said to the young boy, “for I have a LIBRARY CARD!!!!!!” (while actually freaking out that I might have to: (i) change out of my “comfy” clothes, (ii) move my slothlike self off of the sofa after a hard day at work, or (iii) embarrass the child by refusing to change out of P.J. pants whilst chauffeuring him to pick up a hard copy of the book). I asked the small boy (with much trepidation) “what book do you need?” and he answered “The Outsiders.” I was filled with glee and assured my son I could easily help him with any questions about that book as I read it a bunch of times myself 800 years ago when I was a young girl. The boy was dubious, so in order to ease his mind I searched the interwebs and was thrilled to find out The Outsiders was available in Kindle format from the library. Whilst waiting for the book to load on to the Kindle, I turned to my son and said the following words: “When I stepped out into the bright sunlight, from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home . . .” Followed by: “BLAM! TAKE THAT SUCKA! STILL WANT TO TANGLE WITH THE MEMORY OF THIS OLD LADY? YEAH, I DIDN’T THINK SO, NOW WHAT’S YOUR QUESTION?” The boy was able to pick my geriatric brain for assistance with his homework and it turned out the book wasn’t really a requirement in order to get the assignment done in the first place. (Note to all of you youngsters who do not yet have children of you own – THEY ARE WILEY MOFOS AND EVEN THE MOST HONOR-ROLL-A-RIFIC KID WILL AT SOME POINT GO TO ANY AND ALL LENGTHS TO AVOID HOMEWORK.) Thus, I found myself left with The Outsiders on the Kindle and it was seriously begging me to put down the crappy book I was currently reading and take a trip down memory lane. So that’s just what I did . . . It was just as good as I remembered it. The Outsiders is the quintessential teenage story about love and loss and family and right and wrong and good and bad. I read it in an evening, sitting outside during a sunset, as one should do if given the opportunity. It proved to be timeless, it still made me teary-eyed after all these years, and I still thought it had one of the best ensemble cast of characters ever put to paper. And then I remembered it was written by a teenager - one of those awful things that lives in my house and makes my hair turn gray. So let me wrap up this non-review kind of review with a personal note: To my son, I ask you to recognize everything I do for you is with love, just like Darry Curtis and Ponyboy, and I promise I will do everything in my power to make you “stay gold” as long as possible.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    3.5 stars rounded. This book seemed too nihilistic for my taste. A lot of events occur. A group of youths called the Greasers oppose the Socs, a suburban group, rival to the Greasers. I didn't cherish this book in places. It's lugubrious at times. What is the motivation for whom is a forgotten question by the time the plot unravels. Despite its nihilistic clothing, there is some heart to the novel. Only one needs to have limited experience with novels to find this one fresh.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mayra

    Expectations scare me. I had heard so many wonderful things about this book. And it’s never a good idea to expect too much, because that’s such a big opportunity for disappointment. So I always prefer to know the least amount possible about any book I’m interested in. However, the insurmountable praise for The Outsiders has always been tough to evade. It’s everywhere. I found that the quality of this book was perfectly evidenced by the fact that the immense expectation and build-up accumulated th Expectations scare me. I had heard so many wonderful things about this book. And it’s never a good idea to expect too much, because that’s such a big opportunity for disappointment. So I always prefer to know the least amount possible about any book I’m interested in. However, the insurmountable praise for The Outsiders has always been tough to evade. It’s everywhere. I found that the quality of this book was perfectly evidenced by the fact that the immense expectation and build-up accumulated throughout the years were so well met by the actual classic worthiness of the story and the way it was told. Loved the simple, original narrative. Great, real, well-developed, relatable characters. This book is heartwarming and heartbreaking... so prepare your heart for the exercise.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    It was quite enjoyable, but I truly do not believe teenage boys in 1960s Oklahoma thought about each other's pretty hair.

  15. 5 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    'Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold...'

  16. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    Read for Popsugar's 2018 Reading Challenge #11: A book with a female author who uses a male pseudonym It's been ten years since I read this book, and I'm happy to see it definitely holds up to my high expectations, since I loved it dearly in the eighth grade. It's one of those books that makes me want to immediately read it all over again, and that's pretty rare for me. Fantastic!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Councillor

    Sometimes there are peculiar stories, stories which will not leave you for a long time and which are going to accompany you long after having turned the last page. Sometimes there are touching stories, stories which feel so realistic that you believe every word the author puts into the novel. Sometimes a book simply doesn't need perfect writing, beautiful language or consistent, flawless plotlines. The Outsiders is one of those books. It has flaws, not everything is believable. But there is someth Sometimes there are peculiar stories, stories which will not leave you for a long time and which are going to accompany you long after having turned the last page. Sometimes there are touching stories, stories which feel so realistic that you believe every word the author puts into the novel. Sometimes a book simply doesn't need perfect writing, beautiful language or consistent, flawless plotlines. The Outsiders is one of those books. It has flaws, not everything is believable. But there is something else it has: heartwarming emotions. And sometimes a book needs nothing but to be full of emotions, and that's what moved me so much in this engaging tale which is, in its very essence, a love letter to humanity and friendship.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kylie Alvey &#x1f52e;&#x1f940;

    What did I think ? I think I’m falling in love all over again. This will always be my favorite book and I am see myself reading this another 4 times during this year. I believe this is a book that all ages need to read, it’s such a life changer and it shows you have rough people have it. Rich or poor everybody goes through some sort of hell. It teaches you to respect and appreciate where you are brought up and who you are brought up with. Always choose kindness. This book is some what violent, funn What did I think ? I think I’m falling in love all over again. This will always be my favorite book and I am see myself reading this another 4 times during this year. I believe this is a book that all ages need to read, it’s such a life changer and it shows you have rough people have it. Rich or poor everybody goes through some sort of hell. It teaches you to respect and appreciate where you are brought up and who you are brought up with. Always choose kindness. This book is some what violent, funny yet witty, sad but joyful and most of us important! ADDING TO THIS: i love it way more and Ponyboy speaks to me on a personal level.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brigid ✩ Cool Ninja Sharpshooter ✩

    I LOVE this book. I don't know why I find it so good. The whole thing just seems so real. It's really exciting, and the characters are all really believable. I like how the story was written by a young author who really knew what she was writing about--she based it partly on the experiences of her friends. It's like people say--"Write what you know." And S.E. Hinton did just that, and did an excellent job. The book does have some corny parts, and is one of very few books that actually made me cr I LOVE this book. I don't know why I find it so good. The whole thing just seems so real. It's really exciting, and the characters are all really believable. I like how the story was written by a young author who really knew what she was writing about--she based it partly on the experiences of her friends. It's like people say--"Write what you know." And S.E. Hinton did just that, and did an excellent job. The book does have some corny parts, and is one of very few books that actually made me cry. But it's really fantastic, and I think everyone in the whole world should read it! (But don't watch the movie. It's awful.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    may ❀

    i was actually spoiled for the ending of this book by Fangirl (SO BE AWARE) but DESPITE THAT i still really really liked this book 😭😭 i am weak for a group of tragic boys with tragic pasts who are outwardly dangerous and feared but are actually deep down soft marshmallows and love each other more than life and would die for each other man, i love that trope

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adita ✨The Slumbering Insomniac✨

    ★★★★★★★★★★[10/10] Learning that the initials in S E Hinton stands for Susan Eloise was what it took me to have my initial awe multiplied many times over and have it oozing out to drench everything wet-able around me. While there are plenty of quirks that set this story apart from the similar coming-of-age dramas, I will write about a few that remain fresh in my memory exactly two months after I read the book. ✅ The unconventional names. Sodapop and Ponyboy aren't usually the kind of names that yo ★★★★★★★★★★[10/10] Learning that the initials in S E Hinton stands for Susan Eloise was what it took me to have my initial awe multiplied many times over and have it oozing out to drench everything wet-able around me. While there are plenty of quirks that set this story apart from the similar coming-of-age dramas, I will write about a few that remain fresh in my memory exactly two months after I read the book. ✅ The unconventional names. Sodapop and Ponyboy aren't usually the kind of names that you go about hearing everyday in your life. Well, Peter and John aren't, either; for I come from another culture, but something about these names tells me that I will keep associating them with The Outsiders as long as nature decides not to eat up my brain, more than I will ever relate Charlie to The Perks of Being a Wallflower. These names certainly have burnt the name of the book into the history of young-adult classics for eternity. ✅ The class divide. The rural-urban, poor-rich, havenots-haves, greasers-sops divide has formed the crux of countless number of stories that men had made up ever since they started witnessing them plague their real lives too, but The Outsiders explores the world of the teenagers who have come into the first touch of harsh reality where they have to fend for themselves and do anything to survive the vile, vile world; even if it includes killing people. Only, they are not a bunch of savages running around flashing knives and brandishing weapons with a barbaric glint in their eyes-- but real nice kids who would just go to school and try to make it big in their lives if only they had the right avenues opening up before them. ✅ The devil-may-care attitude. You see two of your friends die right in front of your eyes. Not likely to happen in our always-calm-and-no-storm lives. However it isn't hard to imagine that this might be a everyday happening elsewhere. Kids get into bloody street fights, brawls and get killed- all because that is what they think life is all about and there is no one to lead them out of this vicious circle of life. The cool and detached way Hinton describes the struggles that the Greasers have to face to get through everyday and how they regard friendship as their highest ideal and how the supposedly tough and steel-hearted Dally gave up his life to uphold his virtue sent chills up my spine. And it reminded me why this extraordinary story of a seemingly simple, unexciting and ordinary bunch of street kids has carved a niche for itself in the annals of the 20th century literary history. ✅ Lastly, the image of Patrick Swayze and Tom Cruise popping up in my head at the mention of Darry and Steve. Am I mistaken? And here I thought I was capable of writing reviews without screwing up even a little.  

  22. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    Occasionally a book is written at the perfect time, with the perfect story, with the perfect group of characters; and it is written with a passion and an insight that make it unique, that distinguishes it from any other book and any other story. And sometimes it defines a generation, or a culture or sub-culture of that generation. That, my friends, is what this book does. Is that what 15 year old Susan Eloise Hinton had in mind when she started to write this book? Probably not, but she was affec Occasionally a book is written at the perfect time, with the perfect story, with the perfect group of characters; and it is written with a passion and an insight that make it unique, that distinguishes it from any other book and any other story. And sometimes it defines a generation, or a culture or sub-culture of that generation. That, my friends, is what this book does. Is that what 15 year old Susan Eloise Hinton had in mind when she started to write this book? Probably not, but she was affected by what she saw in her 1965 Oklahoma high school; the presence of two rival gangs, the Greasers and the Socs. It inspired her to write a story, their story, and by doing so it resonated across a nation, across a generation, and it became what it is today, a symbol of that generation, and a classic in American literature.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~

    Actual Rating: 3.5 Stars The Outsiders is a simple story; it's a glimpse into the lives of a gang of boys who all occupy the poorer side of their small town, and are otherwise known as greasers. They are in constant feud with the "socialite" rich kids, or soc's for short. The very first thing I want to mention about The Outsiders is that S.E. Hinton was only a 16-year-old high school student when she authored it. She was inspired to write about teenagers in a way that represented them accurately Actual Rating: 3.5 Stars The Outsiders is a simple story; it's a glimpse into the lives of a gang of boys who all occupy the poorer side of their small town, and are otherwise known as greasers. They are in constant feud with the "socialite" rich kids, or soc's for short. The very first thing I want to mention about The Outsiders is that S.E. Hinton was only a 16-year-old high school student when she authored it. She was inspired to write about teenagers in a way that represented them accurately because she felt as though there weren't many books doing that. Knowing this particular fact really impressed me, because I would be proud to have published something like this in my 30's or 40's, let alone at 16. This novel's strongest quality is the perspective of its main character, Ponyboy Curtis. He is 14, the baby of the group, and it becomes clear almost immediately that he struggles to fit into the rigid expectations of his caste. Ponyboy is steadfastly loyal to his gang, shows up for his side in a rumble, and claims the title "greaser" with an air of pride. However, he goes against the grain by being academically oriented & malleable in his attitude toward life. The honesty in his narrative voice gives us an adulterated look at how he wavers back & forth between praising & condemning the division of social classes. For him, the allegiance of the greasers is far superior, even akin to brotherhood, while the order of the soc's is based on selfishness & dominance. But Pony is not ignorant to the trouble that comes with being poor in his town, and multiple times he expresses grief over inevitability of his friends' futures. Hinton uses this short tale to make some powerful statements about importance of family, the potency of friendship, and the haste with which all of that can be taken away from you. The poison of branding individuals by their social standing, the struggling combatting the taboo of leaving a small town in search of personal success. These concepts are handled with an insightful intelligence for a writer so young. Hinton actually ends up exemplifying the point of her novel with her own accomplishment of penning The Outsiders so early on in her life. The older we get, the easier it is to underestimate how much young people truly know. For me though, this is a book I am glad I will never have to read again. It is very well-written, and shockingly sad in many places over only a handful of pages. I can appreciate its existence & understand the critical representation it provided for the era. But I didn't enjoy it the way I've enjoyed other classics. I won't necessarily think back fondly on the experience of reading it, nor will I have the urge to rave & recommend it to my bookish friends. It's a book I am glad to read for the context it provides & because it's a voice that deserves to be heard. Thanks to Celeste for buddy reading this with me even though I was an abysmal reading partner & accidentally spoiled you for a big twist in the book! *shovels dirt onto her own grave*

  24. 4 out of 5

    HeavyReader

    I read this book when I was 13. It moved me so that as soon as I got to the end, I turned back to the beginning and read it straight through again. Of course, all this reading was accompanied by much heartfelt crying. I told my mom that it was my favorite book. She told me it was not my favorite book. She really meant it wasn't the most well-written book I had ever read, and she was probably right about that. But no one call tell another person what is or isn't his/her/hir favorite book, because I read this book when I was 13. It moved me so that as soon as I got to the end, I turned back to the beginning and read it straight through again. Of course, all this reading was accompanied by much heartfelt crying. I told my mom that it was my favorite book. She told me it was not my favorite book. She really meant it wasn't the most well-written book I had ever read, and she was probably right about that. But no one call tell another person what is or isn't his/her/hir favorite book, because that's an opinion, objective. I knew that even at age 13. So I argued back and told her that it was my favorite book. Of course, this wasn't the first time I had argued with my mother, but it was probably the first time I had argued back with such conviction. I think she knew things were only going to get worse for our mother/daughter relationship. I can't forget that she was a good sport and took me (and my sister, who probably didn't want to be there any more than my mother did) to see the movie adaptation of this book. It was dreadful. I even knew how bad it was at the time, even though I didn't want to admit it. One more note...My cousin LIsa was somewhat obsessed with this book at the same time I was. I don't think she was quite as obsessed with it as I was, but she read it and we talked about it. Now her son is in junior high, and he just read this book as a class assignment. I think that makes me officially old.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Baker

    It's impressive that S. E. Hinton wrote this when she was sixteen years old. I wish I had been that ambitious at that age!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Full review now posted! Wow, this was an incredibly powerful book. And it was made more powerful (for me) by the knowledge that the author was only 16 when she penned it. The story of Ponyboy, his brothers, and their gang of greaser friends was profoundly emotional. The violence between opposing gangs, and the lack of adult knowledge or interference, seemed so sad and pointless, but adolescent rage with no direction or purpose has to exert itself in some way. These boys just wanted to survive, an Full review now posted! Wow, this was an incredibly powerful book. And it was made more powerful (for me) by the knowledge that the author was only 16 when she penned it. The story of Ponyboy, his brothers, and their gang of greaser friends was profoundly emotional. The violence between opposing gangs, and the lack of adult knowledge or interference, seemed so sad and pointless, but adolescent rage with no direction or purpose has to exert itself in some way. These boys just wanted to survive, and to possibly find happiness in the process, but life is so very against them. All of the greasers, even those who weren’t present quite as often, were very well developed. Each of them were unique individuals, despite being members of a gang that sprang from the pen of a teenager. However, my two favorites were Ponyboy, our main character, and Johnny. These two were a little more obviously sensitive than the rest of their group, and the other boys fought desperately to preserve this innocence that they themselves had already lost. This protectiveness was sweet and heartbreaking and seemingly futile in the face of poverty and gang wars and other symptoms of having to living in such a broken world. But even in the midst of such tragedy, there is always hope. Sunsets and chocolate cake for breakfast and brothers who would give you the shirt off their backs if it would make you smile all proclaim this hope. Good friends and track meets and laughter and Gone with the Wind all make life worth living, even when it hurts. This is another book that I wish I had found when I was a teenager, but better late than never, right? Hinton wrote the story she needed, one of teens portrayed as they really are, in all their angry, laughing glory. This was a tale of hardship and how unfair life can be and the resilience of adolescents. It was sad and moving and life-affirming. If you haven’t read it, please do so. And if you know a teen that is raging against the hand they’ve been dealt, try to get a copy of this into their hands. A buddy read with the lovely Mary! For more of my reviews, as well as my own fiction and thoughts on life, check out my blog, Celestial Musings.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Grace (BURTSBOOKS)

    The Outsiders is not only a classic but one of my favourite books of all time, and I do not in anyway feel worthy enough to be reviewing it, but here we are. I’m not going to give a synopsis because I’m sure everyone already knows what this book is about but let me just say, I love this book so much; it broke my heart and I can’t believe I waited so long to read it. My family had been bugging me to read this since my 11th birthday, and I finally caved this year and let me tell you, I wasn’t disa The Outsiders is not only a classic but one of my favourite books of all time, and I do not in anyway feel worthy enough to be reviewing it, but here we are. I’m not going to give a synopsis because I’m sure everyone already knows what this book is about but let me just say, I love this book so much; it broke my heart and I can’t believe I waited so long to read it. My family had been bugging me to read this since my 11th birthday, and I finally caved this year and let me tell you, I wasn’t disappointed in the slightest. I don’t give out 5-star ratings often and it takes a lot for a book to make me want to give it a perfect score but, to me, this book is perfection. The ideas and themes, the overall story and most importantly the characters. Every character in this book is so well written and well realized, not to mention relatable and loveable. Reading about this group of friends, or more appropriately brothers, was beautiful and as I said earlier, heartbreaking. I love Dally Winston with all my heart, and after Adam Parrish, he is my favourite character, probably ever. I think (and cry) about him all the time. If you’re like me and for whatever reason, you’ve been putting reading this off, stop! Read it! You won’t be disappointed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    The Outsiders is on my list of 100 Best Films Ever Made. And I hate Tom Cruise. I hate everything about the man. His religion, his face, his hair, the way he plays the same character in every movie (Tropic Thunder excluded, but that character was just as annoying as regular Tom Cruise, so fuck that guy too), but I can stand him as Steve in the film because he's just kinda... there. I think Matt Dillon and Ralph Macchio steal the show, but that's just me. Anyfloop, that's how I feel about the mov The Outsiders is on my list of 100 Best Films Ever Made. And I hate Tom Cruise. I hate everything about the man. His religion, his face, his hair, the way he plays the same character in every movie (Tropic Thunder excluded, but that character was just as annoying as regular Tom Cruise, so fuck that guy too), but I can stand him as Steve in the film because he's just kinda... there. I think Matt Dillon and Ralph Macchio steal the show, but that's just me. Anyfloop, that's how I feel about the movie. (For a minute there, I forgot I was reviewing the book...) I suppose the reason I started a review of this book with a comment on the film is because they are not much different from each other. If you're pressed for time, the film will do just fine. Of course, if you want more inner thought and motivation, read the book. Continuing the comparison of film and book (why the fuck not, right?), I believe that the movie handles (view spoiler)[Dally's death (hide spoiler)] better than the book. In the novel, it's glossed over and damn near cast aside. Considering I loved that character, I gotta put the film above the book. Sorry, purists, but my honest opinion is my honest opinion, and you have every right to be wrong. So be wrong over there. The audiobook is serviceable but nothing special. I swapped between the text and the audio because the narrator, at times, drove me crazy. Jim Fyfe is all right, I suppose, but his faux-hick accent was quite over the top in places, and I couldn't stand his performance of Dally. You might not become as annoyed, but I live in Alabama Country and I deal with necks o' red more than any sane human should. So, if'n you unt to, give this 'ere audiobook a try, 'cause we all knows ya can't read words good. In summation: This is a classic. Read it. 156 pages isn't going to kill you, even if you have seen the movie. The audiobook can be annoying if you don't like hillbilly vernacular, so don't say I didn't warn you. Final Judgment: Johnny's letter makes me cry.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    I am currently 15, and my aunt gave me this book when I was about 12. When I got the book, I put on a happy face and said I as excited to read it. But honestly I did not want to read a book about boys in a bad part of town and about street fights. But my aunt kept asking me if I read it, and after a few months I picked up the book, and from there, I couldn't put it down. This book was so inspirational and great. I loved every one of the characters. My favorite characters were definitely Johnny a I am currently 15, and my aunt gave me this book when I was about 12. When I got the book, I put on a happy face and said I as excited to read it. But honestly I did not want to read a book about boys in a bad part of town and about street fights. But my aunt kept asking me if I read it, and after a few months I picked up the book, and from there, I couldn't put it down. This book was so inspirational and great. I loved every one of the characters. My favorite characters were definitely Johnny and Dallas though. If you are ever hesitant about reading this book, don't second guess it like I did. The story is so real. Things happen, people die. When you read this book, you leave your living room, and you end up in a different, scary world. You read a story that people like you are actually living. And that's the scary part. I cried in this book, laughed a few times, were amused by the characters, and hated some too. This book is not my style, but I thank my aunt for introducing me to this book, that I would never dare try on my own. This book is fantastic and I have nothing but great words to say. I can't think of one flaw, it is great. Give it the chance it deserves. I am in love with this book and it is my favorite book. This book was absolutely great and deserves all the attention it gets. Read this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    "Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold..." "Greasers" stick together. Ponyboy Curtis is a greaser, he wears his hair long, filled with hair oil, walks with a slouch to look "tuff", and will stand up and defend the group of guys he has grown up with to the bitter end. Despite all of this Ponyboy isn't a real greaser, he is a dreamer who gets good grades, and wonders about the world, and wants better things for himself and those around him. This is the story of a group of "brothers" who have to deal with "Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold..." "Greasers" stick together. Ponyboy Curtis is a greaser, he wears his hair long, filled with hair oil, walks with a slouch to look "tuff", and will stand up and defend the group of guys he has grown up with to the bitter end. Despite all of this Ponyboy isn't a real greaser, he is a dreamer who gets good grades, and wonders about the world, and wants better things for himself and those around him. This is the story of a group of "brothers" who have to deal with the social injustices of being considered hoodlums, society thinks this is what they are; therefore, that is what they have become. This is a heartbreaking story about a friendship, societal injustices, prejudices, social classes, and above all else the bond of brotherhood. I reread this book for a rereadathon, and despite the fact that it makes me ugly cry, and there are some issues with the book, I am so happy that I reread it. It is still one of my favorite books and it broke my heart as much this time as every time before.

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