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Title: Locked In
Author: Marcia Muller
Publisher: Published October 1st 2009 by Grand Central Publishing (first published 2009)
ISBN: 9780446581059
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Shot in the head by an unknown assailant, San Francisco private eye Sharon McCone finds herself trapped by locked-in syndrome: almost total paralysis but an alert, conscious mind. Since the late-night attack occurred at her agency's offices, the natural conclusion was that it was connected to one of the firm's cases. As Sharon lies in her hospital bed, furiously trying to Shot in the head by an unknown assailant, San Francisco private eye Sharon McCone finds herself trapped by locked-in syndrome: almost total paralysis but an alert, conscious mind. Since the late-night attack occurred at her agency's offices, the natural conclusion was that it was connected to one of the firm's cases. As Sharon lies in her hospital bed, furiously trying to break out of her body's prison and discover her attacker's identity, all the members of her agency fan out to find the reason why she was assaulted. Meanwhile, Sharon becomes a locked-in detective, evaluating the clues from her staff's separate investigations and discovering unsettling truths that could put her life in jeopardy again. As the case draws to a surprising and even shocking conclusion, Sharon's husband, Hy, must decide whether or not to surrender to his own violent past and exact fatal vengeance when the person responsible is identified.

30 review for Locked In

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    I loved this book even more than I had expected to from LJ's comments. I took my pristine copy to bed with me to sample as I settled in; and ended up finishing it at about 1:30 AM, sore eyes notwithstanding. Moving and intelligent, at one spot it had me laughing and crying at the same time. Now that I have LOCKED IN on my kindle, it's completely handy for rereads. My favorite contemporary mystery new read of 2009, also favorite mystery reread of 2014. Read 7 times.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gail Cooke

    There is no doubt that Marcia Muller is one of the top mystery writers working today. She has the Grand Masters Award from the Mystery Writers of America plus a host of other honors to prove it. However, her army of readers don't need these affirmations to know that a Muller book is going to intrigue and entertain them. Best known for stories featuring private investigator Sharon McCone this author suprises us with her latest, Locked In. McCone has been a top favorite since her debut in 1977; we There is no doubt that Marcia Muller is one of the top mystery writers working today. She has the Grand Masters Award from the Mystery Writers of America plus a host of other honors to prove it. However, her army of readers don't need these affirmations to know that a Muller book is going to intrigue and entertain them. Best known for stories featuring private investigator Sharon McCone this author suprises us with her latest, Locked In. McCone has been a top favorite since her debut in 1977; we think we know her pretty well. Nonetheless, this title's opener is a real shocker: on a misty July night in San Francisco McCone's vintage MG runs out of gas. Fortunately, she's not too far from her office on the Pier and she takes off for it on foot. Once at the security grille to the Pier she called for the security guard, Lewis, a problem alcoholic. He's not to be found. She uses her security code to open the door to the Pier's entrance, climbs the stairs to the office's catwalk, and finds the door unlocked. It's dark inside, there's a sudden motion -she is shot. The bullet has entered her brain leaving her in a comatose state known as locked-in syndrome. She cannot speak or move, totally paralyzed and can communicate only by blinking her eyes in response to a question. So, for once McCone is not at the leader of a crime investigation but the center of it as her team rallies, scurrying for clues, determined to find out who shot McCone and why. What this scenario does in the talented hands of author Muller is allow the reader not only to be fascinated as the reasons for the shooting are revealed but also to become better acquainted with the major players in this series as each one turns over every rock searching for the assailant. Of course, McCone series readers are familiar with Hy Ripinsky, partner and husband to McCone yet here he is revealed in utter anguish as he remembers his past and articulates his hopes for a future with McCone. There is Latina Julia Rafael who'd "been hooking and dealing on the tough streets of the Mission district when she was a teenager,"but McCone saw so much more and placed confidence in her, helping Julia to turn her life around. There's Mick Savage, McCone's nephew who had pulled some pretty dumb stunts, but his aunt "had been solid as a rock, taking him seriously, treating him like a man when he was only a kid." He loved her and he owed her. These and others are united by their determination to catch whoever had almost killed McCone. Revelations of what they are finding are interspersed with thoughts running through McCone's mind as she is by turns discouraged, enraged, and bent on somehow escaping the prison that her body has become. For this reader Locked In is the best of the McCone series, and that's saying quite a bit! - Gail Cooke

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Locked In is the latest Sharon McCone mystery from author, Marcia Muller. This book opens with a bang. Sharon is headed back to the office. When she arrives, she goes to unlock her office door but it is already unlocked. She heads into her office and hears a loud bang, right before she passes out. Sharon wakes up to find herself lying in a hospital bed with her husband by her side. The problem Sharon now faces is that she is trapped inside her body in what is called “locked-in syndrome”. A syndr Locked In is the latest Sharon McCone mystery from author, Marcia Muller. This book opens with a bang. Sharon is headed back to the office. When she arrives, she goes to unlock her office door but it is already unlocked. She heads into her office and hears a loud bang, right before she passes out. Sharon wakes up to find herself lying in a hospital bed with her husband by her side. The problem Sharon now faces is that she is trapped inside her body in what is called “locked-in syndrome”. A syndrome where the person is conscious and can hear everything around them but their body won’t respond and neither will their eyes. It is up to Sharon’s husband to find the person responsible for his wife’s condition. Time is racing. Locked In is the second Sharon McCone book I have read. Burned Out is the first. While I didn’t really care for the first, I thought I would give this book a try. The concept really drew me in and made me excited to want try another novel by Marcia Muller. The beginning of this book really got my heart racing but about a third of the way in, I quickly lost interest in the plot and the characters. The only times when I became intrigued was when the story would flash to Sharon. Overall, I probably won’t read anymore Sharon McCone novels. Don’t let my thoughts stop you though from trying this book out if you want as there are many people who do like this series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: A typical July night in San Francisco. That typical July night ends up as anything but when private investigator Sharon McCone returns to her office late one evening, and is shot. But bullet has lodged in her head and left her, not in a coma, but locked-in. She can hear, see and think, but neither talk nor move. Her husband, Hy, and her McCone Investigation team are focused on finding the shooter. The story definitely starts with a bang. From there, each chapter is narrated by a di First Sentence: A typical July night in San Francisco. That typical July night ends up as anything but when private investigator Sharon McCone returns to her office late one evening, and is shot. But bullet has lodged in her head and left her, not in a coma, but locked-in. She can hear, see and think, but neither talk nor move. Her husband, Hy, and her McCone Investigation team are focused on finding the shooter. The story definitely starts with a bang. From there, each chapter is narrated by a different characters, but it is very effectively and clearly done. Muller effectively conveys each person’s emotions, but particularly Sharon’s. I felt her transition from confusion to fear, anger, frustration, rage, hopelessness, and determination. It was also the first time I felt the real connection between McCone and Hy. The plot is well constructed, building as a puzzle, one piece at the time. Odd as it sounds, the only reason I didn’t rate it excellent is know from the beginning what Sharon’s outcome will be thereby diminishing some of the impact and suspense. Other than that, this may be one of my favorite McCone books. LOCKED IN (Priv Inves-Sharon McCone-No. Cal-Cont) – VG+ Muller, Marsha – 26th in series Grand Central Publications, 2009, US Hardcover – ISBN: 9780446581059

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pam Rivera

    This was my first time reading a book by this author or featuring this private eye and I was not disappointed. Not only was the story suspenseful and a great mystery, but it also appealed to me as a Speech-Language Pathologist. After being shot in the head, Sharon McCone suffered from Locked-In Syndrome, a very rare and misunderstood condition that results in the inability to speak or move while you understand everything going on around you. Individuals with locked-in syndrome can only communica This was my first time reading a book by this author or featuring this private eye and I was not disappointed. Not only was the story suspenseful and a great mystery, but it also appealed to me as a Speech-Language Pathologist. After being shot in the head, Sharon McCone suffered from Locked-In Syndrome, a very rare and misunderstood condition that results in the inability to speak or move while you understand everything going on around you. Individuals with locked-in syndrome can only communicate through eye blinks, eye gaze, etc. I thought the author did a great job of communicating the frustration McCone must have experienced as well as the difficulties those around her had coping with her disorder. I also thought she captured well the idea that communication difficulties are not equated with intelligence in spite of the fact that most of us assume someone who cannot communicate is "slow" or "stupid". In her protagonist, she had a very intelligent private investigator who was very involved in solving the mystery surrounding her shooter in spite of her locked-in syndrome. I would like to read more books by this author and will certainly recommend this book to lovers of mystery as well as my speech therapy friends and colleagues.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    The 27th Sharon McCone mystery finds McCone hospitalized, paralyzed by a gunshot wound to the head, in a "locked-in" state, meaning that she can hear, she can think, but she cannot move or talk. At best, she can respond by blinking - once for "yes", twice for "no". Her colleagues gather to try to find out who attacked her, delving through old files on the not unreasonable assumption that this was likely related to one of her old cases. Ordinarily, Muller writes from McCone's point of view. But be The 27th Sharon McCone mystery finds McCone hospitalized, paralyzed by a gunshot wound to the head, in a "locked-in" state, meaning that she can hear, she can think, but she cannot move or talk. At best, she can respond by blinking - once for "yes", twice for "no". Her colleagues gather to try to find out who attacked her, delving through old files on the not unreasonable assumption that this was likely related to one of her old cases. Ordinarily, Muller writes from McCone's point of view. But because of the situation in which she has placed her protagonist, this book is written from multiple points of view. It's a departure which I found interesting, and which worked, particularly as we also got inside Sharon's head as she responded mentally to what she was being told by others. Muller really captured the frustration that someone who is "locked-in" must feel, particularly if that person is ordinarily as physically and mentally active as McCone.

  7. 4 out of 5

    judy

    I have a problem but it's not the book--it's me. I'm pretty sure that I've read all the McCone series--and there are a ton of them. In this book Muller reprises the background of all the people we've come to know--operatives and family. While the refresher was helpful, I realized I just didn't care. Since her early days as a struggling PI at All Souls, McCone has practically become a CEO. She has so many people working for her that it took me awhile--and sometimes the backstories--to sort them o I have a problem but it's not the book--it's me. I'm pretty sure that I've read all the McCone series--and there are a ton of them. In this book Muller reprises the background of all the people we've come to know--operatives and family. While the refresher was helpful, I realized I just didn't care. Since her early days as a struggling PI at All Souls, McCone has practically become a CEO. She has so many people working for her that it took me awhile--and sometimes the backstories--to sort them out. Then, there's the whole family thing. This may work fine for most of her fans, but not for me. McCone, thankfully, is still McCone but the other characters are getting in my way. Will I read the next book? Oh probably. She is still an excellent writer and this book was done very well. She does deserve her Grand Master award. I'm just being picky.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jan C

    I like Marcia Muller and this one was no different. As I finished, I noted that the dedication is "To Bill, for a story that started out as a joke." I am thinking that is the only way to explain this one. She has Sharon McCone getting shot in the head and she has been diagnosed with "locked-in syndrome." That's right - her main character is paralyzed and cannot talk. This is practically a death sentence. Some people can live for years and some for mere months. So I was thinking, wow, how is she go I like Marcia Muller and this one was no different. As I finished, I noted that the dedication is "To Bill, for a story that started out as a joke." I am thinking that is the only way to explain this one. She has Sharon McCone getting shot in the head and she has been diagnosed with "locked-in syndrome." That's right - her main character is paralyzed and cannot talk. This is practically a death sentence. Some people can live for years and some for mere months. So I was thinking, wow, how is she going to get out of this or ... is this the last book? Anyway, we do get to know her staff at McCone Investigations as they try to follow what leads they have, or think they have, to her shooter. But, obviously, the best parts were the parts going on in McCone's head as she was trying to figure out how she was going to rise above this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    This was a different format from Mueller's books. Sharon McCone is "locked-in" a coma, but is able to hear as people talk to her. Chapters are short as they rotate through the staff and family of McCone's agency trying to figure out who attacked Sharon and shot her causing the injury to her brain. I was interested, also in learning about "Locked-in" syndrome, which is a real medical situation. So I went on to read a book written by someone that experienced this condition. The Diving Bell and the This was a different format from Mueller's books. Sharon McCone is "locked-in" a coma, but is able to hear as people talk to her. Chapters are short as they rotate through the staff and family of McCone's agency trying to figure out who attacked Sharon and shot her causing the injury to her brain. I was interested, also in learning about "Locked-in" syndrome, which is a real medical situation. So I went on to read a book written by someone that experienced this condition. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly See, you can learn even by reading a simple detective novel!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Janette

    The premise is scary - the idea of being fully aware but unable to move a muscle... I enjoyed the book, and didn't want to put it down till I had finished, but I found it a little choppy - every chapter is from a different character's pov, and I had to keep going back to refresh my memory. Still - I would recommend it - there were lots of dead bodies, but no gratuitous gore, and the characters were interesting. I would mention that this was the first book I have read by this author, so I am proba The premise is scary - the idea of being fully aware but unable to move a muscle... I enjoyed the book, and didn't want to put it down till I had finished, but I found it a little choppy - every chapter is from a different character's pov, and I had to keep going back to refresh my memory. Still - I would recommend it - there were lots of dead bodies, but no gratuitous gore, and the characters were interesting. I would mention that this was the first book I have read by this author, so I am probably missing out on some nuances apparent to those who have seen these characters develop.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is one of the finest Marcia Muller mysteries in the series. It starts out with the shooting of Sharon McCone, which puts her in Locked in Syndrome, while her coworkers find out who've done this to her on various past cases and in some of their POVs. It's fast paced for a good flow, that would keep you guessing all the way with subtle clues and hints, to the final chapters. Nice read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    good. short very quick read (lots of blank pages)fairly predictable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rizello

    Once I got started with the story, I realized that I had read it a long time ago. The main character is attacked at the beginning of the story and she is put into a state where she can think but she can't communicate, so the rest of her staff has to solve the mystery on their own.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mei

    Did not excite me at all. I suppose it is a good concept - first person POV where the narrator is trapped in her own body, paralysed but conscious and unable to communicate - but I don’t think it was properly explored and the thing resolved itself too quickly and neatly.

  15. 5 out of 5

    janis louthis

    !Maybe her best, so far. I have enjoyed all of Mueller's books that I have read. I'm very happy to see that her stories become better as time goes by. This one kept me in suspense all the way to the end. Thank you, Me Mueller.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Flusche

    not her best work but a pretty good read

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tiina

    Interesting set-up for a mystery. Smooth reading!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Bonia

    Sharon McCone is a highly sucessful private investigator from humble origins who has managed to cobble together a wonderful family, and several loyal and dedicated employees and colleagues who will do just about anything for her. Sharon is a vibrant member of the community and an investigative professional at the top of her game. She is also used to being in the middle of it all – involved in every way- so when she is shot and critically injured one night after returning to her office, it is deva Sharon McCone is a highly sucessful private investigator from humble origins who has managed to cobble together a wonderful family, and several loyal and dedicated employees and colleagues who will do just about anything for her. Sharon is a vibrant member of the community and an investigative professional at the top of her game. She is also used to being in the middle of it all – involved in every way- so when she is shot and critically injured one night after returning to her office, it is devastating for her to wake up to discover that she is literally locked into her body, unable to either move or communicate with either the hospital staff or her loved ones. Never a quitter, Sharon is determined to find a way to make herself heard, recover fully, and find out who is responsible for the shooting that locked her into her body. I found this to be such a refreshing way to tell a detective/PI story. Right away the main character is disabled and taken out of the action. Most of the story is told through the eyes of the investigators she has working with her at the firm, and her husband Hy, a mysterious man with a quick temper and a shady past. This is the 27th book in the series, so as you can imagine all of the players in this one have a long and tangled history with one another, that was a bit difficult for me to follow since I just jumped right into the series with this book. A further complicating factor were the multiple characters narrating the action of the story in addition to Sharon’s perspective from her hospital bed, however, I had enough information from frequent references to the back stories that I was able to enjoy reading this and keep up with the main relationships. Sharon is adopted and in touch with both her biological and adoptive families, and I loved the interaction that she had with both sides of her family. I was particularly touched by the exchanges that she had with her biological father. The suspense was very intense for me and adding to that was the seriousness of Sharon’s “locked-in” condition. The prognosis for people living with this is usually only a few short months, and Sharon had several close-calls due to other medical emergencies stemming from the shooting. With so many books in the series I had no idea if this was the way that the author planned to finish it up, so I was on pins and needles to see what would happen. All of the different investigators chased down leads from their cases to see what, if anything, they had to do with Sharon’s shooting, while Sharon doggedly used her eyes to communicate with her team to catch her shooter. There were quite a few cases involved, so I don’t know if it was possible to guess the ending or figure out what was going on, but I enjoyed the story and characters enough to want to read some of the others in the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    E

    In the last McCone book (Burn Out), Sharon was experiencing depression; in this book, she is paralyzed. Is Muller trying to tell us something about her relationship to this long-time protagonist? Yeah, I know that Locked In won the 2010 Shamus, but both books left me with the feeling that Muller is just tired, tired of Sharon McCone. And her writing shows it. While I did enjoy the variety of perspectives that Muller chose for this book and the ability it gave us to delve more closely into the us In the last McCone book (Burn Out), Sharon was experiencing depression; in this book, she is paralyzed. Is Muller trying to tell us something about her relationship to this long-time protagonist? Yeah, I know that Locked In won the 2010 Shamus, but both books left me with the feeling that Muller is just tired, tired of Sharon McCone. And her writing shows it. While I did enjoy the variety of perspectives that Muller chose for this book and the ability it gave us to delve more closely into the usually sidelined characters like Rae, Mick, or Hy, it almost felt more like an evasion of Sharon (aha! here's a way to get away from Sharon, from the pesky limitations of first-person narrative) than a writing choice made deliberately to enhance the narrative. Perhaps this type of problem is part of the package of writers with series' characters that stretch over decades. I have received this same feeling of author-burnout tiredness in a few of the last Kate Wilhelm Barbara Holloway series (esp. Cold Case); Stephen Whites (Kill Me, Siege)where Alan Gregory is a no-show; Dana Stabenows (her turn away from the Shugak series to terror and spy plots); and Graftons (esp. R and S where Kinsey was still physically present in the stories but the plots and writing were critically depleted, and like, Muller in Locked In, she split the narrative off from Kinsey's perspective--though T showed a fine return to the Grafton of yore). Maybe if I'd been writing about the same character for 1-3 decades, I'd want some space, too. It might help if the authors didn't feel compelled to churn out a book a year, like most of these authors do. Sara Paretsky doesn't fall into this trap and seems to be able to maintain a high level of complexity and depth with the VI Warshawski series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lexie Stoneking

    'Locked In'.......hmmmmm, I'm still trying to decipher how I feel about this book. Many times after I finish reading a book I will have strong feels, either positive or negative. I really don't when in comes to this book, which probably isn't a good thing. I liked the idea of the story line, especially the idea that one of the main characters was locked in. In fact, this is what initially drew me to the book. I almost wish that more of the story would have revolved around her. I would have been 'Locked In'.......hmmmmm, I'm still trying to decipher how I feel about this book. Many times after I finish reading a book I will have strong feels, either positive or negative. I really don't when in comes to this book, which probably isn't a good thing. I liked the idea of the story line, especially the idea that one of the main characters was locked in. In fact, this is what initially drew me to the book. I almost wish that more of the story would have revolved around her. I would have been difficult to write, but I'm sure a talented writer could do it. So much of this book focused on her co-workers and the multiple different cases they were working. It became difficult to follow not only which character was working which case, but what was going on in all of the different cases. All of the cases started to merge together and we find out they are all interconnected. Something that I didn't like is that all of the cases connected but one. And it turns out that that one case was the most important one of all; the case that solved who shot Shar. Maybe all of the interconnected stories would have worked better if they were explained more. I rarely say this, but this book may have benefited from being longer. Granted, if this book was the 26th in the series, the author doesn't have a lot of time to devote to each novel. That being said, it is important to remember this is the 26th book in the series. It can be read as a stand alone (that's what I did), but that probably added to my sense of confusion. Overall, it was a decent book, but I have no desire to read it again or any other in this series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Corman

    Too realistic for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Hagen

    Locked In, by Marcia Muller, A-minus, narrated by Deanna Hurst, produced by BBC Audio Books America, downloaded from audible.com. In this book Sharon McCone goes back to the office at night on the deserted wharf to get her cell phone, and surprises someone in the office who shoots her in the head. Sharon enters into “Locked In” syndrome, where she is alert in her mind but totally paralyzed. She has to learn to use her eyes to make contact with her husband and her staff. Everyone believes that the Locked In, by Marcia Muller, A-minus, narrated by Deanna Hurst, produced by BBC Audio Books America, downloaded from audible.com. In this book Sharon McCone goes back to the office at night on the deserted wharf to get her cell phone, and surprises someone in the office who shoots her in the head. Sharon enters into “Locked In” syndrome, where she is alert in her mind but totally paralyzed. She has to learn to use her eyes to make contact with her husband and her staff. Everyone believes that the shooting came out of one of their ongoing cases, so everyone is busy looking at cases they suspect might lead to the conclusion of Sharon being shot. Several murders occur while everyone is trying to figure things out, and one of the newer staff members is suspect as a spy. City politics are involved, a sex scandal, the disappearance of young girls, just to name a few scenarios. Somehow Marcia Muller kept all the balls in the air at the same time and we came to a satisfactory conclusion. The only thing wrong was the narrator spent the book using as Sharon’s nickname Char. I’ve read most of these books from the Library for the Blind, and they were narrated by Pam Ward, who now reads commercially. Because Sharon had a sister, Charlene, it doesn’t make much sense for Sharon’s nickname to be Char, and in fact Pam Ward always referred to her as Share, probably not spelled that way. I found this change in the pronunciation of her nickname annoying enough to lower the grade to A-minus.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laren

    Private Detective Sharon McCone is shot outside her agency and her injuries result in "Locked-In" Syndrome, where a patient can see and hear everything going on, but she can't move or communicate except for blinking her eyes. Her agency tries to solve her shooting while she tries to help from her bed. I have not read any of the other books in this series about this detective, and I believe that could be why I didn't like the story much. There was a large cast of characters, and the story is told Private Detective Sharon McCone is shot outside her agency and her injuries result in "Locked-In" Syndrome, where a patient can see and hear everything going on, but she can't move or communicate except for blinking her eyes. Her agency tries to solve her shooting while she tries to help from her bed. I have not read any of the other books in this series about this detective, and I believe that could be why I didn't like the story much. There was a large cast of characters, and the story is told from many points of view. But I had trouble keeping track of them all, partly because they all worked at the agency and I was unfamiliar with any of them, and partly because the author didn't really write each character in a different voice. They all seemed pretty much the same, save for the hispanic woman whose heritage seemed to be written solely for the purpose of using swear words in Spanish. There were many references to what I assume were stories from previous books in the series, but they didn't really seem to have much purpose in being rehashed here other than to add more names to the already overstuffed cast of characters. The ultimate solution wasn't really one the reader had too much hope of figuring out until the characters did either. So all in all, not my cup of tea.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I don't know why this series doesn't get as much press as Sue Grafton's alphabet books. I think Sharon McCone is at least as compelling a character as Kinsey Millhone, and always seemed to me a little more real and realized. Muller started writing the series in 1977 and since then, McCone has morphed from a legal investigator into an early-middle-aged married woman who owns a large PI agency in San Francisco. In the first pages of this book, McCone is shot and ends up a victim of locked-in syndr I don't know why this series doesn't get as much press as Sue Grafton's alphabet books. I think Sharon McCone is at least as compelling a character as Kinsey Millhone, and always seemed to me a little more real and realized. Muller started writing the series in 1977 and since then, McCone has morphed from a legal investigator into an early-middle-aged married woman who owns a large PI agency in San Francisco. In the first pages of this book, McCone is shot and ends up a victim of locked-in syndrome; she can hear and think but cannot move any part of her body or talk. She can blink. Her husband and agency employees revisit old cases in an attempt to figure out who shot McCone, while visiting her and trying to include her in the investigations. The story tackles multiple points of view and Muller uses the various voices to remind us of the important people in McCone's life and brings us up to date on their lives. This sometimes felt like a review session for the final exam, but often it works and the book was a page-turner. The solution wasn't especially interesting but this is a worthwhile entry to the series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While this was another murder-mystery type and it's, like, the 27th in a series, Locked In was an enjoyable weekend getaway. At home. During the week. It kept me occupied on the train and during my down-time at work for a couple of days. And that's really all a girl needs from a book that she got for free via FirstReads (in exchange for an honest review). Sharon McCone gets shot in the head and spends a month and a half stuck there. In her head, I mean. But the whole time, she's all like, "Grr! T While this was another murder-mystery type and it's, like, the 27th in a series, Locked In was an enjoyable weekend getaway. At home. During the week. It kept me occupied on the train and during my down-time at work for a couple of days. And that's really all a girl needs from a book that she got for free via FirstReads (in exchange for an honest review). Sharon McCone gets shot in the head and spends a month and a half stuck there. In her head, I mean. But the whole time, she's all like, "Grr! This isn't going to be my life! I'm going to solve this case and get back to kickin' buttocks!" And she does. 'Cause she's Sharon McCone. Also, the almost death is what saved her from being totally immobile except for eye-blinks until she died of bedsores or something hideous. So if you're into guessing whodunnit, and you're looking for a pleasant, though temporary, escape from reality, I'm sure this could be just the thing. Also, if you've read the other 26 Sharon McCones, I'm sure this one will be quite a lot more exciting and engaging. (In case you missed it, I received a free copy through FirstReads in exchange for an honest review.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Had already read this book, but didn't remember much, so I reread it. Just as good as the first time. Still love this series! Now need to check if there are any new books.... Exciting, hard to put down. Shot in the head by an unknown assailant, San Francisco private eye Sharon McCone finds herself trapped by locked-in syndrome: almost total paralysis but an alert, conscious mind. Since the late-night attack occurred at her agency's offices, the natural conclusion was that it was connected to one Had already read this book, but didn't remember much, so I reread it. Just as good as the first time. Still love this series! Now need to check if there are any new books.... Exciting, hard to put down. Shot in the head by an unknown assailant, San Francisco private eye Sharon McCone finds herself trapped by locked-in syndrome: almost total paralysis but an alert, conscious mind. Since the late-night attack occurred at her agency's offices, the natural conclusion was that it was connected to one of the firm's cases. As Sharon lies in her hospital bed, furiously trying to break out of her body's prison and discover her attacker's identity, all the members of her agency fan out to find the reason why she was assaulted. Meanwhile, Sharon becomes a locked-in detective, evaluating the clues from her staff's separate investigations and discovering unsettling truths that could put her life in jeopardy again. As the case draws to a surprising and even shocking conclusion, Sharon's husband, Hy, must decide whether or not to surrender to his own violent past and exact fatal vengeance when the person responsible is identified.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vannessa Anderson

    Sharon McCone is shot in the head in her office. She recovers but suffers Locked-In Syndrome (a rare neurological disorder characterized by complete paralysis of voluntary muscles in all parts of the body except for those that control eye movement. It may result from traumatic brain injury, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases that destroy the myelin sheath surrounding nerve cells, or medication overdose. Individuals with locked-in syndrome are conscious and can think and reason, but are Sharon McCone is shot in the head in her office. She recovers but suffers Locked-In Syndrome (a rare neurological disorder characterized by complete paralysis of voluntary muscles in all parts of the body except for those that control eye movement. It may result from traumatic brain injury, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases that destroy the myelin sheath surrounding nerve cells, or medication overdose. Individuals with locked-in syndrome are conscious and can think and reason, but are unable to speak or move. The disorder leaves individuals completely mute and paralyzed. Communication may be possible with blinking eye movements). Only being able to communicate her thoughts through blinking eye movements leaves her frustrated. While trying to find the perp who shot and left McCone for dead, to solve the case, McCone’s husband and staff runs everything by her while trying to interpret her blinking eye responses. Locked-in is a good read and Deanna Hurst does a good job in storytelling.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    I usually enjoy the books in this series, but this one was just OK. Private investigator Sharon McCone finds herself "locked in," unable to move or communicate except for blinking after a gunshot wound to the head. This scenario proves to be challenging not only for McCone, but the author, as the narrative switches between the many characters who work for her and her husband. As the investigative team search for the assailant who has gravely wounded McCone, Sharon deals with prospect of being co I usually enjoy the books in this series, but this one was just OK. Private investigator Sharon McCone finds herself "locked in," unable to move or communicate except for blinking after a gunshot wound to the head. This scenario proves to be challenging not only for McCone, but the author, as the narrative switches between the many characters who work for her and her husband. As the investigative team search for the assailant who has gravely wounded McCone, Sharon deals with prospect of being confined to a prison within her body. I had a difficult time following the line of investigation and the many red herrings due to the rather quick shifts in the narrative from character to character and eventually found myself skipping those sections in order to focus on the ones devoted to McCone and her husband. That was the more compelling part of the story for me and the mystery/crime the least. This book sat in my to-read pile waiting for the right day to devote to what I thought would be an enjoyable read, but alas it didn't live up to my own build up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lettie Cox

    No

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I really like the McCone series. It isn't an exciting roller coaster ride, but a steady solid investigation of facts leading to a cleverly constructed ending. Sometimes it was hard in this one to follow the story, as it was divided up between all of the characters trying to solve murders and each character was announced and followed separately as they followed their leads. This method of storytelling fit into the plot of this book, as Sharon McCone is shot and her parts are basically told from i I really like the McCone series. It isn't an exciting roller coaster ride, but a steady solid investigation of facts leading to a cleverly constructed ending. Sometimes it was hard in this one to follow the story, as it was divided up between all of the characters trying to solve murders and each character was announced and followed separately as they followed their leads. This method of storytelling fit into the plot of this book, as Sharon McCone is shot and her parts are basically told from inside her head, as she cannot speak or move. But all the parts come together at the end and there is an ending twist which I enjoyed. I originally gave this three stars but changed it because looking back, I realize how much I really enjoyed it. Tbe audio recording was slightly above adequate. Susan Erickson, a terrific reader does read some of the books in the series, but this isn't one of them. She pretty much spoils me for anyone else, as her ability to individualize the voices makes the story more enjoyable and the plot easier to follow.

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