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Acecho Virtual (Kay Scarpetta #8)

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Un thriller aterrador en el que las pistas no aparecen y el asesino lanza sus amenazas por el ciberespacio.


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Un thriller aterrador en el que las pistas no aparecen y el asesino lanza sus amenazas por el ciberespacio.

30 review for Acecho Virtual (Kay Scarpetta #8)

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review Unnatural Exposure, the 8th book in the "Kay Scarpetta" thriller series, published in 1997, by Patricia Cornwell, get 3 of 5 stars. By this time, fans of the series know Kay Scarpetta really well, and you either love her or get annoyed by her but love the mysteries. I generally like her as a character, but she did push a few buttons in this installment. Now that shes become fairly famous in her field, she's a little holier-than-thou... probably rightfully so, but still, a little g Book Review Unnatural Exposure, the 8th book in the "Kay Scarpetta" thriller series, published in 1997, by Patricia Cornwell, get 3 of 5 stars. By this time, fans of the series know Kay Scarpetta really well, and you either love her or get annoyed by her but love the mysteries. I generally like her as a character, but she did push a few buttons in this installment. Now that shes become fairly famous in her field, she's a little holier-than-thou... probably rightfully so, but still, a little goes a long way. This one features more of her niece Lucy and a rival ME who seems out to get her. The chase revolves around a serial killer with a body count both in Virginia and in Ireland. Is is the same person? A copy-cat? An accident? When it turns out there is potential of a lethal virus being released, Scarpetta goes into over-drive and pushes everyone further and further. It also seems someone's out to take her down, as well as anyone she's close to. I liked the medical aspect of this book and the foray into virtual reality, but I like reading thriller books for the mystery, not the ultra technical aspects. They've always been technical, slightly ahead of their time... but this one is a bit heavy-handed. A good read, but fell middle of the pack for me. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This mystery featuring Virginia Chief Medical Examiner Kay Scarpetta reminds me of why I was so addicted them a decade ago. You get an irascible, brilliant hero pushed to her limits, the thrills of a dangerous chess match with a serial killer, infighting with jealous competitors, and supportive teamwork from her cool lover Benson, a whiz with the FBI profiling squad, her irreverent blue-collar detective liaison Marino, and her tough techie niece Lucy. This is the 8th of 20 in the series, and, hav This mystery featuring Virginia Chief Medical Examiner Kay Scarpetta reminds me of why I was so addicted them a decade ago. You get an irascible, brilliant hero pushed to her limits, the thrills of a dangerous chess match with a serial killer, infighting with jealous competitors, and supportive teamwork from her cool lover Benson, a whiz with the FBI profiling squad, her irreverent blue-collar detective liaison Marino, and her tough techie niece Lucy. This is the 8th of 20 in the series, and, having read 13, I feel this was the last one that was really satisfying to me. To me it was a pleasure because the story stayed focused on her perspectives on the case and her skills in medical forensics and public health. Unlike some of the later books, this one didn’t divert excessively into the soap opera of her relationships with Marino, Benson, and Lucy. Others may object for the opposite reason, i.e. that it didn’t develop those relationships very much. There is a major public health and infectious disease aspect to the story that appealed to me, although others may be bored with the technical detail or jaded from more thrilling medico-techno thrillers from the likes of Crichton and others. Yet credit is due to Cornwell for helping spawn the current popularity of technically oriented CSI procedurals. And despite the technical detail, the draw of these stories for me is Scarpetta’s personality, tough with those who get in her way and kind and empathetic to those in need.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Surreysmum

    It's odd reading this in 2012, fourteen years after its publication; it must have seemed absolutely up to the minute in '98, with its online goings-on (on AOL!) and its virtual-reality recreation of the crime scene by Scarpetta's whiz-kid niece. And the supervirus/biological terror fears of our time (whether it be AIDS, which is specifically referenced, or bird flu, which is not) are skilfully exploited. But one is constantly just slightly jolted by the careful explanations of technological thin It's odd reading this in 2012, fourteen years after its publication; it must have seemed absolutely up to the minute in '98, with its online goings-on (on AOL!) and its virtual-reality recreation of the crime scene by Scarpetta's whiz-kid niece. And the supervirus/biological terror fears of our time (whether it be AIDS, which is specifically referenced, or bird flu, which is not) are skilfully exploited. But one is constantly just slightly jolted by the careful explanations of technological things that are every kid's playground this scant decade later; and also by the deep, deep sadness surrounding an HIV positive status, which is still treated in Cornwell's text as an automatic death sentence. And I winced at the assumption that the niece's lesbianism absolutely *had* to be kept quiet so as to preserve her FBI/military job; though maybe that wince still isn't entirely gone in the States. Anyway, I won't spoil the ending. It's a classic old-sins-come-back-to-haunt-us one, and a not terribly obvious villain. Really I wasn't reading it for the solution of the mystery anyway; more for that strange sense of culture shock. Cornwell isn't in my top tier, mostly because her autopsy scenes are a bit too graphic for me (she no doubt appeals greatly to the CSI crowd), but this one didn't lose my attention for a minute. And that despite the fact that I am less than enthralled by a protagonist who can't seem to make up her mind amongst several highly presentable suitors.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    I don't think I would be nearly as hard on this book if it weren't in my "501-must-reads" list. It's a perfectly fine mystery book, where instead of a cop or a reporter, it's a medical examiner who leads the way. Very Rizzoli & Isles, if you ask me. It's possible that this book was somehow groundbreaking when it first came out, but somehow I don't feel that it was. There were also a lot of open-ended story lines that didn't get resolved. I'm giving Cornwell the benefit of the doubt that thes I don't think I would be nearly as hard on this book if it weren't in my "501-must-reads" list. It's a perfectly fine mystery book, where instead of a cop or a reporter, it's a medical examiner who leads the way. Very Rizzoli & Isles, if you ask me. It's possible that this book was somehow groundbreaking when it first came out, but somehow I don't feel that it was. There were also a lot of open-ended story lines that didn't get resolved. I'm giving Cornwell the benefit of the doubt that these story lines are resolved in the next book in the series, and not just left out to die. Overall, the mystery just wasn't really a mystery though. It was one of those "serial killer on the loose" books except that you aren't given the opportunity to try to solve the case. There are no red herrings. No real clues or suspects and practically no final showdown. It all wraps up extremely neatly in the last chapter with some random character you met in an early chapter and never heard from again. MAYBE if I read the previous 7 books, I would have guessed this random person, but then I think that's a flaw in a book in a series. Each mystery should at least be able to stand on its own. If I had just picked this up randomly, it would probably have been a 3 because it was entertaining and a quick read. But because I was told it was a "must-read", I must judge it more harshly and I find nothing particularly amazing about it - therefore, it only gets a 2.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe

    By this point I found Scarpetta unbearable. She's stopped resembling any human, and become some sort of paranoid superhero. [Of course, someone always is out to get her, but it's different someones all the time]

  6. 5 out of 5

    _inbetween_

    Due to a conspiracy of postal workers, I'm still stuck with Cornwell. As usual, the relationship between KS and BW happened between this book and the last and now she's sick of him. While there seem more general personal/private moments, they are of the empty variety. She even adds a bloody recipy at one point. The true disappointment though is that Val McDermid's praise is on the cover - Cornwell not only doesn't marry cutting edge science with old fashioned horror, she makes what is genuinely Due to a conspiracy of postal workers, I'm still stuck with Cornwell. As usual, the relationship between KS and BW happened between this book and the last and now she's sick of him. While there seem more general personal/private moments, they are of the empty variety. She even adds a bloody recipy at one point. The true disappointment though is that Val McDermid's praise is on the cover - Cornwell not only doesn't marry cutting edge science with old fashioned horror, she makes what is genuinely tragic seem boring. Of course McDermid must (have) genuinely admire(d) her, but characters standing up to abusive fathers or getting AIDS in crime novels is not that extraordinary to say Wilson copied it, and the review still grates. 150 quick pointless pages in, we have the usual conniving upstart who can't be touched, the usual plane journeys to visit a guy with a microscope, the usual M=fate + L=skinnylovely + B=imposing blablabla. Despite all that, perhaps due to not expecting anything anymore, the first half was a fast read, but then her thin excuse of a "plot" again fades behind pointless chapters on wonderful military achievements - the worst of that was of course Potter's Field and Body Farm especially, two fascinating RL areas she (ab)used for titles and at a flimsy, illogical pretext for her "plots". Not only would I prefer to read the textbooks than what she filters through from her research, she also keeps explaining how one can "mail" photos after "scanning" them in a book published in 1997, adding to the weird mix of condescencion and Crichtonesque info dump. Worst of course is the good Doctor, who goes in unprotected to a body she was told had surely smallpox, and when other people are shot for violating quarantine, she's travelling blithly around, angry that Marino is scared of getting a lethal disease from her - I'm actually too angry to point out all the idiocies about when and how who and what is protected or not. Least of all I care about her second ultra-sensationalist plot though - atom bomb last time, plague this time, she'll run out of James Bond threats soon - this writer is so beyond the pale I'm only glad there's nothing to like. Oh, I liked that KS went and for once helped the wrongfully arrested gay guy - except it was utter overcompensation for the times she did nothing, esp. when it concerned her own employees, and Cornwell's gay men (only/always) weep, and whenever she brings someone soup, they DIE. The criminal is as usual someone we never go to know but KS knew for ages *yawn* and KS's criminally insane stupidity was ok because she knows best that she wasn't rilly sick. The absolute low/high point was the end though. After the - never shown, seen or described - time she spent with BW, she couldn't stand him and he wanted to marry her. Somehow the death of the ever absent Mark (that also happened somewhere between books and cropped up as an aside) is now the big stumbling block she never got over. He was the love of her life? So she has to fly back to the UK again - she might one day well fly to the bloody moon to get a better look at the outline of the USA, if she keeps that up, but anyway - there she makes a scene until the smart FBI guy caves in and confesses Mark had had a woman with him, so she tells BW that she loves him, the end. PS: The only love here is of course for Lucy, who isn't only the smartest, strongest, most beautiful young goddess alive, but in this book there is actually a scene where they nearly land in bed together and KS thinks that she's not Lucy's girlfriend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    This was the one I stopped at when I originally read this series, and I very much remember why: it combines three elements of previous and later installations, namely someone politically trying to frame Scarpetta plus (view spoiler)[terrorism and someone threatening Lucy because lesbians (hide spoiler)] and makes a hash out of all three. Wingo is a welcome and poignant reappearance, as are the events of the very last chapter, which hint that Scarpetta may be able to finally move forward with her This was the one I stopped at when I originally read this series, and I very much remember why: it combines three elements of previous and later installations, namely someone politically trying to frame Scarpetta plus (view spoiler)[terrorism and someone threatening Lucy because lesbians (hide spoiler)] and makes a hash out of all three. Wingo is a welcome and poignant reappearance, as are the events of the very last chapter, which hint that Scarpetta may be able to finally move forward with her life and quit being so self-centered and snappish with everyone. In related news, (view spoiler)[did anyone wind up giving a fuck about the 9 random torsos in Ireland and Virginia? Because the end of the book kind of points to "Nope!" (hide spoiler)] . I'm giving this series one more book to get its act together.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Cornwell returns with a powerful mystery that pits Scarpetta against her most cunning adversary to date. When bodies begin showing up, dismembered, both in Virginia and Ireland, Scarpetta cannot help but investigate to determine what sort of brutal psychopath might be on the loose. When the killer begins to contact her with clues and intimate knowledge from her life, the mystery gets personal. Engaged in an ongoing dialogue in chat rooms, Scarpetta comes cursor to cursor with the killer on numer Cornwell returns with a powerful mystery that pits Scarpetta against her most cunning adversary to date. When bodies begin showing up, dismembered, both in Virginia and Ireland, Scarpetta cannot help but investigate to determine what sort of brutal psychopath might be on the loose. When the killer begins to contact her with clues and intimate knowledge from her life, the mystery gets personal. Engaged in an ongoing dialogue in chat rooms, Scarpetta comes cursor to cursor with the killer on numerous occasions. When the murders escalate and a deadly virus is added to the mix, the case moves from urgent to cataclysmic. Cornwell pulls out all the stops and brings closure in stunning fashion to this exquisite Scarpetta novel, sure to impress fans and newbies alike. The powerful character development for which Cornwell is well known in the series is not lost within this powerful story line and plot. While the detail and attention to nuances is stellar, the reader is not lost in the technical jargon. Cornwell does well to introduce new and exciting ideas into her stories, while keeping her beloved characters and developing their back stories to the point of sucking the reader in. This novel has great development and a whopper of an epilogue to tie up some loose ends left dangling for a few novels. Kudos Madam Cornwell on an excellent novel and a highly entertaining story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    Kay Scarpetta is starting to get on my nerves

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    (view spoiler)[I'm not quite finished but I have a feeling that I know where the WIngo storyline is going and I'm not happy about it. I liked him in the first book. Then he seemed to disappear from books 2-7 and now he's back and she's going to kill him off. This is one of my pet peeves. My biggest pet peeves actually. Author's create this likable side character and then kill them off to let us know that no one is safe... except all the main characters are. Like I could lose Lucy and be ok or Be (view spoiler)[I'm not quite finished but I have a feeling that I know where the WIngo storyline is going and I'm not happy about it. I liked him in the first book. Then he seemed to disappear from books 2-7 and now he's back and she's going to kill him off. This is one of my pet peeves. My biggest pet peeves actually. Author's create this likable side character and then kill them off to let us know that no one is safe... except all the main characters are. Like I could lose Lucy and be ok or Benton, seriously get rid of Benton. Kill off major characters if you want to shock me, but I just don't understand why authors create these little golden nugget side characters and then kill them off. It annoys me. Not to mention Wingo is everything I like and he's a nice counter to Kay. He is big hearted and sweet and smart and earnest. He's her gay morgue assistant that has gotten HIV. Imagine what a great side storyline that would be. And here is my biggest problem with the whole situation... Kay is so freaking irresponsible. I know there is confidentiality and all, but why not take a second from your bitching and moaning about being quarantined and call Wingo? Encourage him to come in to the CDC. You know overall just help save his life.... But whatever, please spend more time trying to keep Benton from sending Lucy into danger. Not that she is a grown women, very healthy and an FBI agent. Please continue treating her like a 10 year old, and screw everyone else.... Ok, I'm a little further along, and she finally thought to call Wingo, but 2 days later and he's surely a goner, maybe his mom too. Right now I'm reading a lot of detail about riding in helicopters and putting on biohazard suits... Finished- Wingo's dead. I really wanted to be wrong... (hide spoiler)] Well, I've finished the book. The mystery that starts this book never gets solved. Lucy and Kay- still not likable. Still don't like Benton. Please give Marino someone who loves him and cares for him, because Kay is pretty awful to him. I just started the next book and Kay actual says to someone- I don't know why you put up with me, and to that I say, I don't know why either...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Johnsergeant

    Downloaded from Audible.com Narrator: C.J. Critt Publisher: Recorded Books, 2004 Length: 11 hours and 12 min. Publisher's Summary Filled with tension and continual surprises, Unnatural Exposure is a thrilling chapter in Virginia Chief Medical Examiner Kay Scarpetta's life, and a triumph for #1 New York Times best-selling author Patricia Cornwell. The body of an elderly woman is found dismembered in a Virginia landfill. Scarpetta initially believes the clues mirror that of a serial killer she's tracked Downloaded from Audible.com Narrator: C.J. Critt Publisher: Recorded Books, 2004 Length: 11 hours and 12 min. Publisher's Summary Filled with tension and continual surprises, Unnatural Exposure is a thrilling chapter in Virginia Chief Medical Examiner Kay Scarpetta's life, and a triumph for #1 New York Times best-selling author Patricia Cornwell. The body of an elderly woman is found dismembered in a Virginia landfill. Scarpetta initially believes the clues mirror that of a serial killer she's tracked before. But upon further investigation, she discovers puzzling pox-like erruptions on the woman's body that, perhaps, point in another direction. When the killer contacts her via e-mail, Scarpetta enlists the aid of her computer-savvy niece, Lucy, to help track this monster through cyberspace. Learning that the Virginia victim was exposed to a high-tech virus that might unleash an epidemic, Scarpetta realizes she's dealing with a sophisticated mind. Her investigation leads her from the government's biological defense facility in Utah, to Atlanta's Center for Disease Control, and eventually to quarrantine, when it is discovered that Scarpetta has been exposed to this fatal virus. Along the way, she's forced to deal with the unscrupulous ambitions of a slick FBI agent, Lucy's problems, and her own turbulent feelings for Agent Wesley Benton. Unnatural Exposure is the 8th book in the Kay Scarpetta series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Normalyn Espejo

    Don't let jealousy bite you because it can destroy you. Be content. This is the first Patricia Cornwell book I've read and I somewhat like it. I love the main character's attitude, namely Dr. Kay Scarpetta. I like that she's firm with a lot of gentleness and kindness to people who needs it. I hate Ring, too bad the book doesn't say if he's been punished. Maybe that will be in the next Cornwell book. I just don't like how the book ended. It's like it's cut short and I had no inkling whodunit becau Don't let jealousy bite you because it can destroy you. Be content. This is the first Patricia Cornwell book I've read and I somewhat like it. I love the main character's attitude, namely Dr. Kay Scarpetta. I like that she's firm with a lot of gentleness and kindness to people who needs it. I hate Ring, too bad the book doesn't say if he's been punished. Maybe that will be in the next Cornwell book. I just don't like how the book ended. It's like it's cut short and I had no inkling whodunit because if memory serves me right there was no mention of Dr. Phyllis Crowder. Maybe I'm used to other books like this where they give clues as to whodunit and you have to make a choice only to be proved wrong in the end. No matter, I am still going to read other Cornwell books. That's definite.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steffi

    bis auf einen kleinen Hänger ist das Buch echt spannend :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    it'chy

    and the healing begins... couldn't keep up with all those biological hazards; plus the ocr is giving me problems the wrap-up was a stunner, though

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lou (BooksAreAWayOfLife)

    DNF on page 132/370 So this is the first book that I DNF in 2018. I just couldn't put myself through this book anymore, which is disappointing because I did really enjoy the first 5 books in the Dr Kay Scarpetta series. But from book 6 I've been disappointed and I won't be continuing on with the series. This book put me into a reading slump, and I didn't think that this book would be worth me reading it until the end. So the plot of this book is that a 10th dismembered body is found in a landfill DNF on page 132/370 So this is the first book that I DNF in 2018. I just couldn't put myself through this book anymore, which is disappointing because I did really enjoy the first 5 books in the Dr Kay Scarpetta series. But from book 6 I've been disappointed and I won't be continuing on with the series. This book put me into a reading slump, and I didn't think that this book would be worth me reading it until the end. So the plot of this book is that a 10th dismembered body is found in a landfill in Richmond, but it's the work of a copy cat killer. I got 1/3rd of the way into this book and the characters had pretty much just found the body. There was some taunting from the killer, but honestly the set up was too slow for the thriller/mystery/crime genre for me. Then the victim is supposed to have small pox (which 1/3 through I had not found out yet but it was on the blurb), and I honestly feel like that is a step too far. That it is not needed if you already have the set up for an international serial killer. It would completely change the set up of the book AGAIN. I had an idea of who the killer was going to be, so I turned to the back to find out the killer was. I was underwhelmed, so I decided that the revelation of the mystery and the motives was not worth me reading the entirety of the book. I would have had to force myself to finish this book and I would not have enjoyed it. In terms of the characters, nothing had changed in this book from the previous books to be honest. The same points are being used over and over again in each of the books, with no real development or change. It's almost gotten to the point where I no longer really care about the characters that I have read and finished 7 whole books about... Overall, I would really recommend the first book in the series. I really loved it, and I have reread it. It was one of the few mystery/thriller/crime books that I have reread and enjoyed. But I wouldn't recommend continuing past book 5 in the series. The plots have gotten worse, to the point of nonsensical. I can no longer believe that these mysteries could be happening on the streets of Richmond. Maybe in a Hollywood TV show but not in real life, and that's whats really put me off this series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brent Soderstrum

    This is Cornwell's 8th Kay Scarpetta book and it is an improvement over her past 3-4. In fact, so far, this is the best ending Cornwell has put together. I was worried she would have her typical yawner of an ending but she has shown me she can put some twists in play. As I was reading the book I was thinking to myself, "Whatever happened to just your typical serial killer?" You see in this one we have someone who is killing people with a disease very like small pox and they are threatening to unl This is Cornwell's 8th Kay Scarpetta book and it is an improvement over her past 3-4. In fact, so far, this is the best ending Cornwell has put together. I was worried she would have her typical yawner of an ending but she has shown me she can put some twists in play. As I was reading the book I was thinking to myself, "Whatever happened to just your typical serial killer?" You see in this one we have someone who is killing people with a disease very like small pox and they are threatening to unleash such a plague on the world. This is the second book in a row that Cornwell had used Kay to save the world from disaster. Dismembered bodies were being found in land dumps. The most recent one found had a rash that was later traced to small pox. The killer was then using aroma therapy spray to transmit the virus directly to people including people in Kay's office. Despite Cornwell trying to make Scarpetta the savior of the world again, this is a good story with a twist at the end that saves the day. Another good thing is that Wesley is now divorced so Kay is no longer the skank ruining his marriage. But get this...now that Wesley is free Kay has pulled back and doesn't want a relationship with him. There is probably some psychological issue there. Lucy is still in her homosexual relationship with Janet and Marino is still needy. Kay is also not a very nice person at times. She tends to look down on people. Yet, despite all of this, this story is really better then her last few.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    3.5! Would have rated it four stars, but the ending was a little weird. -- Still unclear if these are all the same person?? Also, Kay, GO SEE YOUR MOM.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Martin Vallance

    I'm finding the lead character very annoying, maybe she's supposed to be, but I'm almost tempted to stop reading, I won't, but probably won't read another book in the series An annoying OCD main character, and the abrupt conclusion, the series story line was the only reason I kept reading

  19. 4 out of 5

    Blagica

    Cornwell's styles is always engaging and does not disappoint with "Unnatural Exposure". That being said she does get a little technical when it comes to the forensic side of the descriptions. This is part of what makes her writing so great as it paints such detailed pictures. I am working my way through the whole Scarpetta series and have not read one yet i would not highly recommend.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    It's been a long time since I read one of Patricia Cornwell's novels, featuring Medical Examiner extraordinaire, Dr. Kay Scarpetta. When I went to work recently, a fellow book-lover had left me a large bag of books, and "Unnatural Exposure" was among them. I'm glad it was. We start off in Dublin, where Dr. Scarpetta is giving a series of lectures. Conveniently, she's also investigating a series of gruesome serial killings identical to some back in Virginia. The killer severs the head--always at t It's been a long time since I read one of Patricia Cornwell's novels, featuring Medical Examiner extraordinaire, Dr. Kay Scarpetta. When I went to work recently, a fellow book-lover had left me a large bag of books, and "Unnatural Exposure" was among them. I'm glad it was. We start off in Dublin, where Dr. Scarpetta is giving a series of lectures. Conveniently, she's also investigating a series of gruesome serial killings identical to some back in Virginia. The killer severs the head--always at the fifth cervical vertebra--and removes the arms and legs, cutting through the joints; the only things that turn up are the torsos. Back in Virginia, Dr Scarpetta is called to a landfill, where another torso is found. At first, it seems ti fit in with the others, but Kay Scarpetta isn't convinced. The limbs and head were removed in a different manner. She runs into a wall of opposition, a bunch of reactionaries and political haymakers who want this to fit, but Kay Scarpetta follows the evidence, as well as her gut instincts. Thoughts of the serial killer are put on the back burner when an elderly woman is found dead on an isolated fishing island. The woman has apparently died from smallpox, a virus we've eradicated from Earth. Or have we? Soon, Dr Scarpetta plunges headfirst into a maelstrom of epidemiologists, military brass, cops--local, state, and federal--even the U.S. Army. Her mission is to find the evil genius who grows and disseminates the virus, a psycho who taunts her via e-mail under the name "deadoc." Like the other Kay Scarpetta novel I read, it took me a little while before I got into Patricia Cornwell's storytelling style. While this is a pretty quick read, it's not like a James Patterson novel that whips you through with short chapters and nonstop action. Honestly, that's not a bad thing at all--I really like the way Ms Cornwell writes. She shows us the world through Kay Scarpetta's eyes. We're witness to her thoughts and brilliant professionalism, but also to her personal life and shortcomings. Dr. Scarpetta's is an interesting mind to visit. The only reason I didn't initially give this five stars is through no fault of the novel or the novelist. It has to do with technology. A lot of "Unnatural Exposure" deals with computers, and this content--the novel hails from 1997--is understandably outdated. The killer, "deadoc," communicates via AOL on dial-up. People still carry pagers, and cellphones are unreliable and cumbersome. I've read several older novels this year--The Magnificent Ambersons, for example--and the late 19th Century accoutrements didn't bother me. I think this is because it was from an era sufficiently removed from my own, that I could accept that as part of the fiction. I still use a cellphone, and I still use e-mail. I just have a 4G smartphone and high-speed DSL. Some of the "cutting-edge" techniques and equipment in "Unnatural Exposure" are pretty ubiquitous now. Come to think of it, I'll give that star back. It just dawned on me that Kay Scarpetta was trying to stop a terrorist from sending deadly viruses through the mail. This was four years prior to the post-9/11 anthrax mail scares. The scales balance, and Kay Scarpetta takes us on a wonderful ride.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott K

    I coming to the point where a one time enjoyable series is coming to an end. The plots are getting far-fetched, are heroine Dr. Kay Scarpetta is becoming one of the most brilliant know it al nothing phases me, except Wesley & Mark, in short she has become such an everything person to envy, she has become a total hoke to me. This latest caper is almost a 'Kay saves the world' thing. A human torso begins as a simple morbid murder but ends up being just the opening act of a pox virus that will e I coming to the point where a one time enjoyable series is coming to an end. The plots are getting far-fetched, are heroine Dr. Kay Scarpetta is becoming one of the most brilliant know it al nothing phases me, except Wesley & Mark, in short she has become such an everything person to envy, she has become a total hoke to me. This latest caper is almost a 'Kay saves the world' thing. A human torso begins as a simple morbid murder but ends up being just the opening act of a pox virus that will end human life as we know it if Scarpetta doesn't overcome her own exposure (oh no not Kay!?!? Will she die. SPOILER: she doesn't). Her sweet clone niece Lucy is once again the FBI's super brain agent and its to the point the where the world holds its breath for Kay and Lucy to save us. Then there is the ever so sweet Kay male assistant who dies but not before whimpering like a little boy only so Kay can be a nurturing mommy to him. To keep things humble Kay has the drooling dog Officer Marino and the Golden Retriever FBI profiler Benton following her to the ends of the earth. Marino would give his life for loving Kay who one senses may fulfill his desires of loving him if he were in fact the only man left on the face of the earth. FBI MAN Benton, this guy is such a totally a trained pup Kay should think of making them a circus act. She treats him like what dogs leave in the dirt but he is ever so dedicated and loving to her that most ladies I know would tell this guy get a spine then will talk I wish Cornwell would just keep Kay's character to a good or even a great medical examiner investigating mysterious deaths and forego making her the joke she's become.. And before you go the I'm a male chauvinist route my lovely bride in many aspects oversees many things in our household because she does it much better than I could but she doesn't 't have to prove it with great exclamations. I'd like Dr. Kay Scarpetta if she was an intelligent and strong willed woman and not some super woman on steroids. I may browse ahead to some future review to see if Patricia Cornwell tunes it down a tad but if not I much rather go through the alphabet again with Kinsey Malone

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Gomes

    My first Scarpetta book, and I am pleasantly surprised. Scarpetta, a pathologist has headless bodies all around her, but one particular body has her confused, an elderly woman practically starved to death, dismembered and headless does not fit with the other bodies. What adds to her confusion is the fact that not only is this lady an elderly lady but she has been decapitated and dismembered covered in some thick oilcloth, she finds fibers attached to the sawed off bones, the victim has some stra My first Scarpetta book, and I am pleasantly surprised. Scarpetta, a pathologist has headless bodies all around her, but one particular body has her confused, an elderly woman practically starved to death, dismembered and headless does not fit with the other bodies. What adds to her confusion is the fact that not only is this lady an elderly lady but she has been decapitated and dismembered covered in some thick oilcloth, she finds fibers attached to the sawed off bones, the victim has some strange pustules on her back. Then Scarpetta starts receiving messages from the killer, deadoc. Whilst the investigations are in progress, a woman is found dead with terrible pustules all over body, which points to the dreaded smallpox, supposedly eradicated. Tangier, where the woman is found, is quarantined. Everyone works frantically on every lead to contain the disease as well as to find the killer, who by now is spreading the smallpox virus through tampered facial sprays. The killer remains online a minute longer than is safe for him and is located and what follows is shocking. But Cornwell does leave a few loose ends, what happens to the original kller who had decapitated around 10 bodies. Somehow there is no mention of him/her. Although we are left in awe of technology, it is scary that the same technology is available to terrible criminals. Scarier is the thought that biological warfare is so much more dangerous than any other warfare.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I read this one in one day, because once the first pox victim showed up, I realized I had read this one before. The beginning of the book focuses on the hunt for a serial killer who dismembers his victims. This killer has been working both in Ireland and in the United States. Dr. Scarpetta has been looking at the evidence from both the countries. About half way through the book, a new victim shows up who has been dismembered, but not quite in the same way, and also with possible small pox lesions I read this one in one day, because once the first pox victim showed up, I realized I had read this one before. The beginning of the book focuses on the hunt for a serial killer who dismembers his victims. This killer has been working both in Ireland and in the United States. Dr. Scarpetta has been looking at the evidence from both the countries. About half way through the book, a new victim shows up who has been dismembered, but not quite in the same way, and also with possible small pox lesions on her body. This leads to the question of a copycat killer, or has the original killer changed his m.o.? I guess I am not quite clear on if the same person was doing all the killings, or if the small pox victims were killed by one person, and the original dismembered victims killed by another. By the end of the book, when the killer is caught, I understand the reasoning for the small pox killings. But why all the previous dismemberments? That wasn't super clear to me. Even with some plot flaws, I enjoyed this book very much. Biomedical terrorism is a very scary subject, and it is easy to imagine it happening now. The pace of the book was brisk, and the story was compelling. This is one of the best Sarpetta books.

  24. 5 out of 5

    LJ

    UNNATURAL EXPOSURE - G Cornwell, Patricia - 3th kay Scarpetta A sadistic serial killer, the weapon a deadly virus Dublin, Ireland and Richmond, Virginia: separated by thousands of miles - linked by murder. For Dr Kay Scarpetta a lecture stint in Ireland provides the perfect opportunity to find out if the murders on both sides of the Atlantic are indeed connected. Five dismembered, beheaded bodies were found in Ireland five years ago - now four have been discovered in the States. But the tenth corp UNNATURAL EXPOSURE - G Cornwell, Patricia - 3th kay Scarpetta A sadistic serial killer, the weapon a deadly virus Dublin, Ireland and Richmond, Virginia: separated by thousands of miles - linked by murder. For Dr Kay Scarpetta a lecture stint in Ireland provides the perfect opportunity to find out if the murders on both sides of the Atlantic are indeed connected. Five dismembered, beheaded bodies were found in Ireland five years ago - now four have been discovered in the States. But the tenth corpse in Virginia is different. There are vital discrepancies, and an indication that the elderly victim was already seriously ill. A copy-cat killing. Ghoulish, perhaps, but not unusual. And then abject terror grips Scarpetta and her colleagues when the next body is found. The circumstances of death broadcast a clear and horrifying message: the killer is armed with the most lethal weapon on earth - smallpox. Cornwells first four books were great. They have fallen off since then. This was better than some of her recent books but there were still a low of loose ends.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Allison Ann

    WEEK 7 WORD: FUNDED BONUS: RESTAURANT MY LETTER: U for title Book: Unnatural Exposure by Patricia Cornwell Finished: January 20, 2013 Rating & Book Review: 2 stars - I've been rereading this series and enjoying it much less than I did the first time around. All the characters are so miserable and unpleasant and unhappy. I keep reading because I haven't gotten to the new-to-me books yet and the letters they start with are awesome for challenges. :D BONUS WORDS Funded - page 117 - The facility was fun WEEK 7 WORD: FUNDED BONUS: RESTAURANT MY LETTER: U for title Book: Unnatural Exposure by Patricia Cornwell Finished: January 20, 2013 Rating & Book Review: 2 stars - I've been rereading this series and enjoying it much less than I did the first time around. All the characters are so miserable and unpleasant and unhappy. I keep reading because I haven't gotten to the new-to-me books yet and the letters they start with are awesome for challenges. :D BONUS WORDS Funded - page 117 - The facility was funded by the county and about the size of my central office in Richmond. Restaurant - page 115 - We were walking into the restaurant which was appropriately named Mallards...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    Surprisingly, this book was far better than any of the other Patricia Cornwell novels I've read so far. While, it is still more soap opera than story, the plot is actually some-what believable, and for once, the main character isn't perfect. Probably one of my biggest character pet-peeves is when the author makes their main character some fantastical ideal of themselves (Michael Crighton was really good about doing this). In this episode of the ongoing ridiculous adventures of Kay Scarpetta, som Surprisingly, this book was far better than any of the other Patricia Cornwell novels I've read so far. While, it is still more soap opera than story, the plot is actually some-what believable, and for once, the main character isn't perfect. Probably one of my biggest character pet-peeves is when the author makes their main character some fantastical ideal of themselves (Michael Crighton was really good about doing this). In this episode of the ongoing ridiculous adventures of Kay Scarpetta, someone has unleashed some sort of biological warfare agent and announces it in an unusual way. Again, the story itself is decent, but the dialogue is still terrible, the antagonists are still very two-dimensional, and the ending a bit disappointing. Think "Murder She Wrote" where the killer always confesses. Ugh. If you like mysteries and fiction where you don't have to think about much, this book is for you. I will grant, that it is an entertaining read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

    so, my beef with ms. cornwell at this point is that she sets up these beautiful mysteries and then it's like she runs out of steam and just ends them. i mean, really? that's it? there's a new strain of smallpox out there and THAT is how you end it? how did it get to tangier island? what really was up with the motivation for the deadoc? why wait so long? did the rabbit die? bah. i was going along great until i realized there were five pages left. also, can marino have someone love him? while i ap so, my beef with ms. cornwell at this point is that she sets up these beautiful mysteries and then it's like she runs out of steam and just ends them. i mean, really? that's it? there's a new strain of smallpox out there and THAT is how you end it? how did it get to tangier island? what really was up with the motivation for the deadoc? why wait so long? did the rabbit die? bah. i was going along great until i realized there were five pages left. also, can marino have someone love him? while i appreciate the awesome "just friends who really care about each other" friendship they have going, i feel sorry for him, with all his fears about dying and no one caring. he's not that bad of a guy! i was all happy when molly showed up, and then she's written off in a sentence a couple books back and apparently he's done with everything now? all that said, they are addicting, i still like kay, i possibly like lucy and janet even more, and i've starting the next book . . .

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Petersen

    Cornwell seems to love the details of a medical examiner's chores, and I'm right there with her as Dr. Scarpetta dons gloves and haz-mat suits time and again. The buildings (and the bodies) she enters are an amazing array, some quite gristly and gruesome. She certainly gets around, often at a dizzying pace, from Richmond to a Virginia island to Memphis to Utah in an impossible Blackhawk cargo vehicle. It was fun, and fast, just to thing to read while watching well-behaved but busy grandchildren. Cornwell seems to love the details of a medical examiner's chores, and I'm right there with her as Dr. Scarpetta dons gloves and haz-mat suits time and again. The buildings (and the bodies) she enters are an amazing array, some quite gristly and gruesome. She certainly gets around, often at a dizzying pace, from Richmond to a Virginia island to Memphis to Utah in an impossible Blackhawk cargo vehicle. It was fun, and fast, just to thing to read while watching well-behaved but busy grandchildren. Two complaints: Cornwell has two gay men in this book, depicted in no judgmental way, BUT both of them are prone to crying and wringing their hands. Other than that, Keith and Wingo are ordinary enough. The other gripe is that the solution was a bit too pat, completely unexpected and even somewhat unlikely. Still, it was a great ride, and I won't object to finding more of Cornwell on the library shelf.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marti

    This was the best Dr. Kay Scarpella nook that I have read so far. The action moved rapidly and teh tension was built skillfully. There had been 5 grisly murders ten years prior in Ireland and as the book opened, there had been 4 more in America. The bodies had been dismembered, leaving only a trunk. As the novel unfolds, however, there are enough differences to make it likely that this newest case has been done by a different killer than the one or ones who had done the nine previous ones. When This was the best Dr. Kay Scarpella nook that I have read so far. The action moved rapidly and teh tension was built skillfully. There had been 5 grisly murders ten years prior in Ireland and as the book opened, there had been 4 more in America. The bodies had been dismembered, leaving only a trunk. As the novel unfolds, however, there are enough differences to make it likely that this newest case has been done by a different killer than the one or ones who had done the nine previous ones. When Dr. S did the autopsy on the latest victim, she noticed pustules that looked very much like smallpox.Soon enough, Dr. S began getting disturbing messages from "deadoc." Her niece, Lucy, now all grown up, a computer expert and FBI agent, assists Kay in unraveling the mystery. If you like fast paced thrillers and mysteries and books with a strong femal character, this is a book to try.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I started reading this without knowing that it was the eight (or so) book in a series. So somre of the secondary storylines and characters weren't familiar to me since I hadn't read the other books. That made this story a little akward in places. It is narrated by the same person that does the Stephanie Plum series so it took a while to get used to her voice not being Stephanie's. The books was a bit wordy and techincal in places. Also, there were quite a few secondary characters that were hard t I started reading this without knowing that it was the eight (or so) book in a series. So somre of the secondary storylines and characters weren't familiar to me since I hadn't read the other books. That made this story a little akward in places. It is narrated by the same person that does the Stephanie Plum series so it took a while to get used to her voice not being Stephanie's. The books was a bit wordy and techincal in places. Also, there were quite a few secondary characters that were hard to keep straight. The ending seemed a bit abrupt although I really thought the identity of the "bad guy" was unexpected. Overall, this was a good book and I will try to go back and read some of the others in the series.

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