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The Shunning PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Shunning
Author: Beverly Lewis
Publisher: Published August 1st 2000 by Bethany House Publishers (first published January 1st 1997)
ISBN: 9780764224737
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

508413.The_Shunning.pdf

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Book 1 in The Heritage of Lancaster County. Katie Lapp only knew the Amish ways, but when she discovers a satin infant gown in her parents' attic, her hidden past devastates the community she has always called home.

30 review for The Shunning

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I live in a very strict Amish community. I do not share one physical trait with the rest of my family now or in generations past. I seem to have a streak of creativity and music within me that the rest of my family does not. My mother had 2 miscarriages before I came along. For some reason she does not summon the community midwife. Hmmm. My one true love died while away from home and a body was never recovered. I refer to his "empty gravesite" often. Hmmm. How will I ever unravel the mysteries o I live in a very strict Amish community. I do not share one physical trait with the rest of my family now or in generations past. I seem to have a streak of creativity and music within me that the rest of my family does not. My mother had 2 miscarriages before I came along. For some reason she does not summon the community midwife. Hmmm. My one true love died while away from home and a body was never recovered. I refer to his "empty gravesite" often. Hmmm. How will I ever unravel the mysteries of my life? Is my sarcasm too subtle, or are you getting that I thought this book was a wee bit predictable? It might not have been so bad, but along with the predictability comes women embracing their role as second class citizens, mothers willing to turn their backs (literally- we are in Amish country) on their children in the name of their religion for a crime of (gasp!) humming a tune whilst not in church, and emotionally disconnected fathers who would rather see their bishop in a warm shared bed than see a daughter happy! UGH! At the risk of excommunication, I will state that there is the slightest possibility of the book in and about itself not being the sole reason for a less than stellar taste being left in my mouth. Jah. Dat's gut! AAACCCHHHKKKK!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    In Hickory Hollow, Pennsylvania Katie Lapp is a 22 year old amish woman who is unmarried and feels like she does not belong in her community since the death of her first love Daniel. Katie is strong willed and reluctantly agrees to marry the widowed bishop of their community who has young children at home needing a mother. After discovering a satin baby gown hidden away in her mother's cedar chest many questions come to head from Katie. Her mother and father are keeping a secret from her. Once s In Hickory Hollow, Pennsylvania Katie Lapp is a 22 year old amish woman who is unmarried and feels like she does not belong in her community since the death of her first love Daniel. Katie is strong willed and reluctantly agrees to marry the widowed bishop of their community who has young children at home needing a mother. After discovering a satin baby gown hidden away in her mother's cedar chest many questions come to head from Katie. Her mother and father are keeping a secret from her. Once she learns what the secret is many of her feelings and questions about her faith become more clear. This book was very well written, and kept me up late several nights. I knew someone was obviously going to be shunned but Beverly Lewis twisted it in a way that I was not sure who it would be until the very last chapter. I was upset that my library was not open at 10:30 p.m. last night so that I could go get the second book in the series. I have questions I want answered! I have always found the Amish way of life intriguing and enjoyed this book, very much. It seems to be the great beginning of a wonderful series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessika

    This was a good book, and I'm glad I read it. I find Amish culture fascinating, so this book offered insight into a topic I've always wanted to read and learn about. Was this the best work of literature I've ever read? No. Frankly, I thought this book was pretty predictable. I saw the *surprise* ending coming from a mile away. However, I thought this was a nice, leisurely read, and I enjoyed the emphasis on the simple pleasures of the lives of the Plain people. At first, I was a little frustrate This was a good book, and I'm glad I read it. I find Amish culture fascinating, so this book offered insight into a topic I've always wanted to read and learn about. Was this the best work of literature I've ever read? No. Frankly, I thought this book was pretty predictable. I saw the *surprise* ending coming from a mile away. However, I thought this was a nice, leisurely read, and I enjoyed the emphasis on the simple pleasures of the lives of the Plain people. At first, I was a little frustrated with the fact that it's not very fast-paced, which I've come to expect from books I enjoy. After some thought, I realized that the story of an Amish community shouldn't be fast-paced because, in all reality, the lives of Amish people aren't fast-paced. I think the amount of time and care Beverly Lewis has put into this story and its research is very evident, which makes the story all the more charming. I loved that she created characters that I ended up caring about. I was pulling for Katie the entire time. Although I wasn't sure at first, I can definitely say that I'm going to read the other two books in the trilogy. **8/11/10 Re-read Upon re-reading this, I actually enjoyed this book a lot more, even going so far as to bump up this up a star. I connected more with the characters on this go, so I was able to feel more emotionally invested in the story. One thing that I particularly enjoyed this time was that I was able to feel for each of the characters. Before, I was all about rooting for Katie, and therefore, I dismissed anyone else's part in the story. This time, though, I really felt for everyone. I'm also really anxious to start the next book. I really want to find out what happens to Katie. That being said, I still found the writing rather predictable and at some points mediocre. Really, I would not recommend reading this unless you're in the mood for a simple, predictable, romantic, Hallmark/Lifetime-esque book. Overall, I had a much better time with this book after reading it for the second time.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kacey

    I am intrigued by the Amish and was excited to read this book, even though in general I do not exactly care for the simple and somewhat predictable style of "Christian Fiction." I had hoped this author would be different, but truthfully, this first book in a series of three was highly predicable, often slow, and the style was just a bit off in my opinion. She frequently changes points of view between the characters, which means we get the perspective of one character for a page or two, and then I am intrigued by the Amish and was excited to read this book, even though in general I do not exactly care for the simple and somewhat predictable style of "Christian Fiction." I had hoped this author would be different, but truthfully, this first book in a series of three was highly predicable, often slow, and the style was just a bit off in my opinion. She frequently changes points of view between the characters, which means we get the perspective of one character for a page or two, and then another character for a while, and so on. It's done so randomly that it seems like an accident or maybe just lack of concern for continuity of perspective? It made the story a bit jumpy and I didn't care for the effect on the pace or the character development. I wish there had been more mystery to the depth of the characters. Overall they are quite shallow and transparent. Last, the plot just seemed a bit unbelievable, as Katie Lapp is raised from birth with an Amish family, realizes as an adult that she's not truly Amish-born, and starts to easily disconnect from her family in a matter of hours. I didn't care for the overt Nature verses Nurture theme where Nature is the clear dominant, according to this novel. The book portrays her upbringing as having little to no effect on her morals and choices, which to me, is simply absurd. I guessed the largest plot twist in the middle of chapter one. So that pretty much killed the book for me. However, I hate to not finish a series, so I press on with the sequel, The Confession.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michèle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I am an history buff, so always interested in special communities, and the Amish. So as an anthropological trip in Amish county, the book was fulfilling. The whole confession-shunning process is followed in this very severe Amish community. But as a novel, about authority and belonging, the characters were too predictable. Of course, Katie finds out she was adopted, and the rest of the situation (her birth mother very high social status, for instance) is just too "wishful thinking" for me. What I I am an history buff, so always interested in special communities, and the Amish. So as an anthropological trip in Amish county, the book was fulfilling. The whole confession-shunning process is followed in this very severe Amish community. But as a novel, about authority and belonging, the characters were too predictable. Of course, Katie finds out she was adopted, and the rest of the situation (her birth mother very high social status, for instance) is just too "wishful thinking" for me. What I didn't like: the whole premise that being drawn to fancy/nice things is genetic. Because it is heavily reinforced through the book that love of music is genetic, too. (Talent for music might be, although). A fun thing, it take the middle of the book to get the time frame, when someone mentions CD players. Of course, the many unanswered questions at the end of the book aim to get us to read the sequel. A clue: the publisher is a Christian book publisher, so no doubt that the poor lamb, after a foray into the modern world, will return to the fold and settle, with her true love. Whether in the same community or a new one, that remains to be seen.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Katie Lapp always knew there was something different about her, apart from her auburn locks. She was spirited and loved music, she often thought about the colors of dress she has seen on the "English". She didn't want to disobey God, but she didn't really think she was. She tried to be a good daughter, listening to her parents. But there were parts of her always wondered if there was something else other then the Amish ways. After a discovery in the attic she is left wondering even more who she Katie Lapp always knew there was something different about her, apart from her auburn locks. She was spirited and loved music, she often thought about the colors of dress she has seen on the "English". She didn't want to disobey God, but she didn't really think she was. She tried to be a good daughter, listening to her parents. But there were parts of her always wondered if there was something else other then the Amish ways. After a discovery in the attic she is left wondering even more who she is and where is that she belongs. She walks out on her wedding day, realizing settling with out these answers would only lead to much regrets and what ifs. I liked The Shunning, it wasn't the best of Amish fiction I have read but enjoyable all the same. A little predictable, a little frustrating, well a lot frustrating at times. Those times when I wanted to yell at my book and ask how you could do that to someone you love, and call them hypocrites. I'll be on the look out for the next book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It was interesting to get a glimpse of Amish life from the perspective of a young woman. Unfortunately, this book possesses a completely predictable plot (I totally called it early in the book when it was revealed her first love drowned and OF COURSE there was no body to bury and OF COURSE he ends up alive, contacting his sister within the last TEN pages of the book)... it was also sooo frustrating to come to the end of the book, thinking that the major plot points would end up (at least halfway It was interesting to get a glimpse of Amish life from the perspective of a young woman. Unfortunately, this book possesses a completely predictable plot (I totally called it early in the book when it was revealed her first love drowned and OF COURSE there was no body to bury and OF COURSE he ends up alive, contacting his sister within the last TEN pages of the book)... it was also sooo frustrating to come to the end of the book, thinking that the major plot points would end up (at least halfway) resolved, only to find out that, in fact, NOTHING has been resolved and there are TWO MORE books in the series that you have to read to find out what happens to Katie. Well, since I'm guessing that they are equally as predictable as this, I'm guessing that Katie finds her biological mother, becomes heir to her vast fortune and hooks back up with her love Daniel and they live happily ever after. There. Now I don't need to read them and you don't either.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Beverly Lewis is a long time novelist of Amish fiction. Since visiting Holmes County, Ohio, (The second largest Amish Community in the country, I think.) I have developed quite an affection for the Amish people. I have read everything that I can get my hands on regarding the subject, including this series. Most of the novel has a Christian message, but the characters will still capture your heart even if you don't normal read this type of thing. The book begins in a small Amish Community near Lan Beverly Lewis is a long time novelist of Amish fiction. Since visiting Holmes County, Ohio, (The second largest Amish Community in the country, I think.) I have developed quite an affection for the Amish people. I have read everything that I can get my hands on regarding the subject, including this series. Most of the novel has a Christian message, but the characters will still capture your heart even if you don't normal read this type of thing. The book begins in a small Amish Community near Lancaster, PA and unfolds the tale of a young girl's question of faith and curiosity towards the outside world. The Shunning is really an easy read for a long weekend at the lake. Give it a chance. You might actually be surprised.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sicily Yoder

    The Shunning was one of the first books that I read back when it first came out. I had the advantage of merchandising books for Chas Levy in major chains stores, where Beverly's books were fast sellers. If you haven't read Amish books, this book is a good "first book" for you because it is so rich with the Amish culture and vocabulary. Having adopted "Plain" family myself, and other Plain friends, I know that Beverly's books are right-on with the authenticity of the Amish culture. I also enjoy The Shunning was one of the first books that I read back when it first came out. I had the advantage of merchandising books for Chas Levy in major chains stores, where Beverly's books were fast sellers. If you haven't read Amish books, this book is a good "first book" for you because it is so rich with the Amish culture and vocabulary. Having adopted "Plain" family myself, and other Plain friends, I know that Beverly's books are right-on with the authenticity of the Amish culture. I also enjoyed her DVD.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Morrison

    You immeadeatly fall in love with Katie. She is sweet and wants to be a good Amish woman, but she feels like she has never quite fit in. I wish she had made different choices, but its overall an easy read, and at times you wish you could reach in and hug the characters.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    This book was just okay for me. I used to really enjoy Amish fiction. Now....not so much when I realized that it just seemed like it was always the same recycled themes....teen pregnancy or murder. So I had hope for this one because it was about adoption. But it kind of fell flat for me. Katie was such drama queen. Her actions, as an adult woman, seemed so incredibly immature with all the temper tantrums. I had a hard time with her self absorption. So 2 stars.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lewestover

    This is the first book in The Heritage of Lancaster County series. If you're at all interested in the Amish people and their lifestyle, Beverly Lewis is a fine author who has written many books about this group. The stories are quite compelling. "The shunning" is followed by "The confession" and "The reckoning". I read and enjoyed all three.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    ‘The Shunning’ is book one in The Heritage of Lancaster County trilogy by Beverly Lewis and is inspired by the true story of the Author's grandmother who left her plain community. Katie Lapp is a 22 year old Amish girl who has lost her first love, Daniel, in a tragic boating accident. Katie doesn't fit in; she's unhappy with her plain life and feels drawn to a "fancy" way of life. However, she's already made her vows to the faith and is set to marry the local widowed bishop and become a mama to his chi ‘The Shunning’ is book one in The Heritage of Lancaster County trilogy by Beverly Lewis and is inspired by the true story of the Author's grandmother who left her plain community. Katie Lapp is a 22 year old Amish girl who has lost her first love, Daniel, in a tragic boating accident. Katie doesn't fit in; she's unhappy with her plain life and feels drawn to a "fancy" way of life. However, she's already made her vows to the faith and is set to marry the local widowed bishop and become a mama to his children, more-so out of duty to being an upstanding member of her society instead of marrying for love. She feels trapped but is determined to go through with things and become a good Amish woman. When Katie finds a satin baby garment in the attic she begins to question herself about her love for fancy things and her love for music. This puts her in a bad place with her parents, and with the bishop she is set to marry. Eventually her rebellion leads to her shunning. The shunning is a practice that is observed by Old Order Amish and some Mennonite churches. In a society that is very social, the shunning is particularly painful for the individuals who must endure it. The entire community is forbidden to speak to or have any contact with the Shunned. The Amish call the act of shunning- Meidung, which translates from German, avoidance. The book wraps up with Katie leaving her plain community and leaves us with a surprising cliffhanger which I am sure will be explored in the next installment, The Confession. Unlike other authors, who shy from addressing issues of shunning or religious practices of the Amish, Beverly Lewis writes about these issues and gives a realistic view of what the Amish believe and not just a look at their lifestyle.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simon Cowan

    I like the phrase 'compelling story'. True, it's used so much it could almost be a cliche, but I can't think of a better way to describe this book. I love hearing about people, especially when their lives are so vastly different to my own and that's definitely true of the people in this book. The story also reminded me of two old TV shows I still love, the Waltons and Little House On The Prairie. It's blatant escapism but there's a lot to be said for reading about a simpler time, especially when I like the phrase 'compelling story'. True, it's used so much it could almost be a cliche, but I can't think of a better way to describe this book. I love hearing about people, especially when their lives are so vastly different to my own and that's definitely true of the people in this book. The story also reminded me of two old TV shows I still love, the Waltons and Little House On The Prairie. It's blatant escapism but there's a lot to be said for reading about a simpler time, especially when life these days gets as complicated as it does. Anyway I don't see much wrong with taking a break from modernity sometimes. Just like a holiday in the country. All in all a lovely story that I'm glad I read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lacy

    I think I would have liked this book better if I wouldn't have read any of this author's books previously. This really should be the first book you read. I did enjoy it. I find the whole Amish life fascinating. The very idea that she gets outcast from everything she ever knew basically over a guitar is crazy to me. Their were a few over developed parts that I didn't feel needed so much attention, but the ending made any of the slower parts all worth it. I'm quite excited to see how her life chan I think I would have liked this book better if I wouldn't have read any of this author's books previously. This really should be the first book you read. I did enjoy it. I find the whole Amish life fascinating. The very idea that she gets outcast from everything she ever knew basically over a guitar is crazy to me. Their were a few over developed parts that I didn't feel needed so much attention, but the ending made any of the slower parts all worth it. I'm quite excited to see how her life changes. Also, I lover that this is true and written by one of Katie's descendants.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Molly Jebber

    Good story showing why the Amish shun those who leave.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this book via cd (of which there were 8, for 8.75 hours "reading" time). Along with wishing the story would hurry up, and be a little less predictable, I wished the speaker would be just a wee bit faster. I never figured out why Katie didn't know she is adopted. My husband and I were listening to the book while traveling, and somewhere on disc 1 (just after the gown was discovered) we decided the girl was adopted from an English family (English meaning not Amish). So why hasn't that occure I read this book via cd (of which there were 8, for 8.75 hours "reading" time). Along with wishing the story would hurry up, and be a little less predictable, I wished the speaker would be just a wee bit faster. I never figured out why Katie didn't know she is adopted. My husband and I were listening to the book while traveling, and somewhere on disc 1 (just after the gown was discovered) we decided the girl was adopted from an English family (English meaning not Amish). So why hasn't that occured to Katie or for that matter the rest of the community. Mother goes away, comes back with a baby that grows into a child who looks nothing like anyone else in the community, who wouldn't wonder? But I dismiss the whole "born English, have an English attitude" that seems to be cropping up - it doesn't make sense in the community or in life for that matter. We are what we are raised, not what or where we were born. So - the only thing that has me wondering is why Katie didn't try a few of the things she wonders about why she was on Rumsperger (sorry about the spelling). Try on a few gowns, try a bit of singing, wander around and see a few things. Does the author not know a lot about the actual Amish lifestyle? Doesn't she know that Katie would have tried those things - if she was interested - why she was in the 'running around' period? I felt the shunning was a bit of revenge by a jealous, jilted groom (he was the one with the power to start the shunning process). For that matter, why didn't the epilogue tell us anything vital - Katie is where now, other than outside Hickory Hollow? Why did Daniel know where his sister was, and her current last name, if he didn't have a contact in the hollow (she married quite a while after he left). And if Dan had a contact, how come he didn't know Katie was shunned and vanished? Overall, to my way of thinking the ONLY surprise was the way that Katie's parents got her. After I finished the story I was left with more questions, and wondering if the whole purpose of the book was to do the all-too-predictable shunning, to let us get a (contorted) glimpse of the Amish lifestyle, or to preach at us. It fell short on all counts. Not recommended. Sorry this seems to ramble - several different thoughts combined here.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I've always been secretly fascinated with the lives of the Amish, probably stemming from my childhood when I came across a young adult book about a girl from that culture, and I found their lifestyle foreign and intriguing. So when I was browsing the free book selections on Amazon's Kindle website, The Shunning was being offered to Kindle readers at no cost, and I immediately downloaded it. When I finished this book, I understood why the publishers were offering readers such a great deal. This is I've always been secretly fascinated with the lives of the Amish, probably stemming from my childhood when I came across a young adult book about a girl from that culture, and I found their lifestyle foreign and intriguing. So when I was browsing the free book selections on Amazon's Kindle website, The Shunning was being offered to Kindle readers at no cost, and I immediately downloaded it. When I finished this book, I understood why the publishers were offering readers such a great deal. This is the first book in a series; as such, the book delved just deeply enough to grab readers' attention and endear us to the characters before ending abruptly, and with many, many unanswered questions hanging in the balance. I believe it was the intention of the publishers to hook readers enough that they'll then seek out the rest of the series. This book is the story of a young Amish woman who has never really fit into her rigid community, and days before her wedding to a much older community bishop, she makes a discovery that changes her life. Without giving away the premise of the book (series?) this is a book examining the long-debated nature vs. nurture issue: are we who we are because it's "in our blood" or because of our upbringing? Despite the fact that I don't appreciate being drawn in and made to find another book in order to have some questions answered, I did enjoy the reading of this book. This was a fast read, and a good "palate cleanser", if you will, between heavier books. If you enjoy stories about the Amish, you'll probably appreciate the details and level of authenticity that this book provides its readers, but be prepared to be left wanting more.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    5 Stars! Excellent writing with an interesting story line. I truly enjoyed this read, being it was my first Amish book I've ever tried. I don't know much about the Amish community or their beliefs and such, just hearsay, so it was quite nice actually learning something new. In this story, you meet Katie Lapp, a young Amish woman who has only known her Amish friends and family and how to be a respectable Amish Woman. She finds a satin baby gown in her parent's attic one day and it troubles her to fi 5 Stars! Excellent writing with an interesting story line. I truly enjoyed this read, being it was my first Amish book I've ever tried. I don't know much about the Amish community or their beliefs and such, just hearsay, so it was quite nice actually learning something new. In this story, you meet Katie Lapp, a young Amish woman who has only known her Amish friends and family and how to be a respectable Amish Woman. She finds a satin baby gown in her parent's attic one day and it troubles her to find this lying in secret. She wants to know why they have such a beautiful piece of clothing, when the Amish are plain. What she doesn't realize is that the baby gown represents something from her past she may or may not want to know...... Katie has always wanted more in life than being Amish. She wants beautiful things and wants to sing. She keeps most of this in, however, because to want these things is not right in the eyes of God, according to the Amish. Will Katie soon find out things that make her life better in the end? Or will she continue on her sinful ways and risk being "shunned" but the community? I will say, there's no way I could ever be Amish..... I am a Christian and I believe in God and Jesus, but the way they worship and believe is quite extreme!!! But, it was still enjoyable to learn about the Amish beliefs and their way of living. Anyway ~ I definitely enjoyed this book and can't wait to pick up the second in the series to find out what happens. Considering, this book kind of had a SHOCKING event at the end ;)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Dyslin

    I loved the book also by Beverly Lewis, Child of Mine, so I was excited to start this book. I have to admit, I was a little disappointed. Firstly, I think the way Lewis portrayed the Amish was a little wrong. From this book I got the impression that the Amish were mean cold-hearted people with no sense of other peoples' feelings (all of Katie's brothers were jerks) and the "Englisher" life was the way to go. ??? I mean, sure, the Amish have a different way of doing things - and it isn't for ever I loved the book also by Beverly Lewis, Child of Mine, so I was excited to start this book. I have to admit, I was a little disappointed. Firstly, I think the way Lewis portrayed the Amish was a little wrong. From this book I got the impression that the Amish were mean cold-hearted people with no sense of other peoples' feelings (all of Katie's brothers were jerks) and the "Englisher" life was the way to go. ??? I mean, sure, the Amish have a different way of doing things - and it isn't for everyone - but that's doesn't mean there is anything wrong with being Amish. Well, anyway, aside from that - it was okay. The shunning part was sad and depressing. The part about Dan Fisher was depressing (but after the end of the book I it was a little better). The part about the adoption was depressing. Leaving Hickory Hollow was depressing. But the book ended on a note of hope. I liked Lewis's style of writing. And a lot of things about the story I really enjoyed, like Ella Mae and Katie's friendship with Mary, and the undending and enduring love of Rebecca. The message of the story was also good, too - that man cannot be saved by works and his own doing. It is only by believing in the Salvation Jesus Christ gave us when dying on the cross to save us from our sins that we are saved. I liked it enough so that I want (and am going to) read the second book. :-) Four stars out of five.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Arianne

    This series has to be one of my favorites by Beverly Lewis. I think it's the first series from her that I read. This story deals with a young Amish woman finding out she was adopted, and trying to decide between her Amish family and Englischer family, or between her average life and fairy tale life. I like books by Beverly Lewis because they are a pleasant read. Lewis often writes books set in Amish country. I used to live close to several Amish settlements, so I had a little window into Amish l This series has to be one of my favorites by Beverly Lewis. I think it's the first series from her that I read. This story deals with a young Amish woman finding out she was adopted, and trying to decide between her Amish family and Englischer family, or between her average life and fairy tale life. I like books by Beverly Lewis because they are a pleasant read. Lewis often writes books set in Amish country. I used to live close to several Amish settlements, so I had a little window into Amish life. I also enjoy her usage of Pennsylvania Dutch, which I like to pretend I understand, because it's derived from German, which I do understand. Lewis addresses modern topics in her stories, such as cancer, "Englischers" discovering the bounties that Amish life has to offer children born out of wedlock, etc. Her characters are interesting, although I have to say after a while, they tend to blend together after a while. The characters are either firm in their faith, or wavering. If they waver, they predictably become Mennonites. They find love and satisfaction in their lives, and the people are always pretty in their own way. It gets kinda old. But, again, it's a pleasant read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This book was pretty good... except for the completely unresolved ending. That part was pretty annoying...

  23. 5 out of 5

    CJ Scurria

    Little did young Katie Lapp know a simple garment she finds in the attic could lead to a complete revolution to her life. After she spots a hidden piece of clothing from the past she unearths something that helps bring her family toward a dramatic change. Maybe for the worse. Why was this kept here? And why is it made of something no Amish baby would ever wear? As Katie digs deeper she learns much of herself as well as long for something different. A new Katie. But it will cost more than any amou Little did young Katie Lapp know a simple garment she finds in the attic could lead to a complete revolution to her life. After she spots a hidden piece of clothing from the past she unearths something that helps bring her family toward a dramatic change. Maybe for the worse. Why was this kept here? And why is it made of something no Amish baby would ever wear? As Katie digs deeper she learns much of herself as well as long for something different. A new Katie. But it will cost more than any amount of money one could ever pay for. It's strange that I have so many different feelings about this book. I think it takes quite a while to get going but I did not completely dislike this book. The best things about it are how it portrays the Amish life. Katie who has lived as a young Amish-woman seemingly since birth has an interesting world going on around her. The culture's simplicity is somewhat as interesting as the rest: the food they make, the fact that they create their own clothing, were established by an intriguing history. All of it I found great. Yet I felt the characters don't seem to get a lot to do within it. Also sometimes I think the characters at times act completely opposite than what one would probably assume they would do in their situations. All of this kind of bugged me while reading it... yet I want to keep reading. It's funny that curiosity got me picking this book up and yet that will probably keep me getting to the next one. I just hope it works out better than this as many authors do as they keep growing and improving their craft book by book. It's also funny that I have seen its movie version before I picked this up, yet I grabbed this from the library because I have forgotten many of the story's events. I think this book is not bad. It's probably not a bad start to anyone who wants to read the subgenre of Amish fiction since it delves into details of what they seem to go through on a daily routine. But I also admit it may not be for everyone.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I liked this way more than I expected. I thought it would be terrible, but I read it quickly and wanted to know what happened next. Some of the writing is a little clumsy. The writer keeps referring to a "secret," and since she constantly tells you to know there's a secret, I figured it out pretty instantly. It'd be a little more elegant to not be so direct. I loved the main character Katie and her struggles with loving her Amish family and friends and yet feeling like she doesn't fit in. I was I liked this way more than I expected. I thought it would be terrible, but I read it quickly and wanted to know what happened next. Some of the writing is a little clumsy. The writer keeps referring to a "secret," and since she constantly tells you to know there's a secret, I figured it out pretty instantly. It'd be a little more elegant to not be so direct. I loved the main character Katie and her struggles with loving her Amish family and friends and yet feeling like she doesn't fit in. I was especially touched by her relationship with her mother Rebecca and appreciated that the author gave a lot of attention to her mother's inner life as well. Many of the characters were pretty flat, but Katie and Rebecca were well written. Also, I enjoyed reading about Amish life and culture and found it really interesting and complex. I don't know much about Amish life, but the writer has a family background in the culture and has done her research. I understand why her books are so popular though I don't know if I'll keep reading the series. Also, it is categorized as Christian fiction but I didn't feel at all bombarded like I expected to be. This was a pretty complex and nuanced portrayal of people unlike much of the Christian fiction I've read before and didn't feel any different from mainstream fiction expect maybe the exclusion of sex and cussing. It is about the Amish after all.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeni Enjaian

    After the utter disappointment of "The Redemption of Sarah Cain," I did not hold out high hopes for this book which served as my introduction to the Amish Christian fiction genre. (I still do not understand the obsession with the lifestyle, the obsession that has led to the creation of an entire genre that unfortunately flies off the shelf.) While the book was not quite as much fluff as "The Redemption of Sarah Cain," none of the characters were adequately developed. Everything felt rushed and c After the utter disappointment of "The Redemption of Sarah Cain," I did not hold out high hopes for this book which served as my introduction to the Amish Christian fiction genre. (I still do not understand the obsession with the lifestyle, the obsession that has led to the creation of an entire genre that unfortunately flies off the shelf.) While the book was not quite as much fluff as "The Redemption of Sarah Cain," none of the characters were adequately developed. Everything felt rushed and character choices made little sense. The outcome could have been predicted at the beginning of the book. I am not bothering to read the remainder of the series. All three books are going into the donate pile.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Hines

    Loved it! Now I need more kindle money so I can buy the rest of the series! At the back of the book it showed movie pictures, so I guess there's a movie of this series. I will wait to watch it until I finish the series, but everyone knows the books are always better. Still, be nice to see how they did:)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    Every once in a while I need a good Amish story to cleanse my palette. Then I find myself reading several in a row. This one was quite good. I felt a strong kinship with Katie as I myself am adopted. However I have always known and cannot imagine finding out when I was 22 and about to be married. Well written and left me needing to know what happens next so I am starting the next one now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

    I LOVED this book!!! It made me laugh, cry, and it left me with a HUGE cliffhanger! I have to read the next one. This is amazing!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    A game-changer in the world of Christian literature...and a great book to boot! Even if you've seen the movie, you should definitely read this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Annika

    I'm a sucker for all things Amish. I don't necessarily regret reading this book, but it certainly wasn't what I expected. I marked it as just "okay" because the story itself is dull, the characters don't shine and are somewhat one-dimensional and contradictory, but the insights into Amish culture are interesting, if one is so fascinated by this group as I am. Katie Lapp is a 22 year old Amish (Plain) girl who lives with her parents and two older brothers (one older brother is married and lives aw I'm a sucker for all things Amish. I don't necessarily regret reading this book, but it certainly wasn't what I expected. I marked it as just "okay" because the story itself is dull, the characters don't shine and are somewhat one-dimensional and contradictory, but the insights into Amish culture are interesting, if one is so fascinated by this group as I am. Katie Lapp is a 22 year old Amish (Plain) girl who lives with her parents and two older brothers (one older brother is married and lives away) and is planning a wedding within a week to a Bishop in the Amish church. He is a widower in his forties with five children and basically needs a mother for them. Since Katie, at 22, is considered "old" by Amish standards to be getting married for the first time, people figure she better grab up Bishop John's proposal before she's ancient. Katie struggles with the "sin" of hearing music and being drawn to "worldly songs". The only singing that is allowed is the Singing of Hymns, and even then they must be slow and reverent hymns. Instruments are forbidden. At some time a few years back, Katie was in love with a liberal-thinking Amish boy named Daniel who had a wicked guitar. Together they would write songs and make up tunes, and Daniel shared with Katie that he had been sneaking off the Farm to a Bible study. Daniel drowns in the sea. Katie is devastated. She reluctantly accepts Bishop John's proposal. She doesn't WANT to marry him, or really be Amish, so she struggles (internally, through the whole book) with what she wants and what has been drilled into her head her entire life. Katie is rummaging in her parents' attic one day and finds a satin rose=colored baby dress with a girl's name embroidered in it. When she confronts her mother, her mother faints. Katie begins to piece together why she struggles with being drawn to music, or why she has auburn hair and everyone else in the community is blond, or why she was born in a hospital when everyone else is just born at home. No spoilers, but the book does end with a cliffhanger. So therefore, I had to find the sequel, even though I can easily see where this is going. The entire Amish belief system, the shunning process, the strict rules and order, are somewhat fascinating. The entire book takes place within a week. It's a pretty fast read, and somewhat predictable. But I'm not so turned off from the book that I haven't already started reading its sequel "The Confession". *sigh* Those addicting Amish.

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