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The Horse and His Boy: Large Print PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Horse and His Boy: Large Print
Author: C.S. Lewis
Publisher: Published December 28th 2017 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform (first published September 6th 1954)
ISBN: 9781981851546
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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On a desperate journey, two runaways meet and join forces. Though they are only looking to escape their harsh and narrow lives, they soon find themselves at the center of a terrible battle. It is a battle that will decide their fate and the fate of Narnia itself.

30 review for The Horse and His Boy: Large Print

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robert Clay

    This is probably my favorite of the Chronicles. It takes place during the Golden Age of Narnia, with the Pevensies reigning in their prime, although the story is actually set in the countries to the south of Narnia, which provides for a rather different feel to much of this novel. I always find the visual imagery captivating: riding across the moors at night, entering the towering city of Tashban, spending a night among the tombs of the ancient kings.

  2. 5 out of 5

    P

    “Do not by any means destroy yourself, for if you live you may yet have good fortune, but all the dead are dead like.” This felt as if I was reading a folktale about a horse and a boy who wander around and seek their new adventure. Yet the humor in this book is abundant, even though the narration is not as intriguing as the other books. And the storyline is quite straight and lacks of twists or epicness, too. I yawned so many times while I was getting past the first half of the book. I'd used “Do not by any means destroy yourself, for if you live you may yet have good fortune, but all the dead are dead like.” This felt as if I was reading a folktale about a horse and a boy who wander around and seek their new adventure. Yet the humor in this book is abundant, even though the narration is not as intriguing as the other books. And the storyline is quite straight and lacks of twists or epicness, too. I yawned so many times while I was getting past the first half of the book. I'd used my whole day to finish this book despite how short it is, the story runs on until I felt so tired and wished it should have ended sooner than later. “When things go wrong, you'll find they usually go on getting worse for some time; but when things once start going right they often go on getting better and better.” Anyway, The Horse and His Boy has strange words that I tried so hard to understand. The dialogues are weird, too, for the characters always talk to each other like, 'O enlightened Prince, O loquacious Vizier, O my resourceful son, O eternal Tisroc, O impeccable Tisroc'. I didn't use to something like this in literatures. But I kind of enjoyed this book, and this is the story that doesn't includes the old characters in it. However, I want to see the conclusion where everything meets it ending and is deduced to the finest point for the readers to see the whole picture. “Do not dare not to dare.” https://goo.gl/9gaT6u

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I feel more conflicted about this book than any of the other Narnia books. On the plus side, the story is stronger and CS Lewis manages to keep his blatant editorializing to a minimum (maybe because none of the characters are transplants from wartime London). But holy crap, the modern reader will find his racist descriptions pretty hard to swallow. He reintroduces his devious, smelly, turban-clad race, the Calormen. A lost white boy is raised among them and he is sad until he is finally reunited I feel more conflicted about this book than any of the other Narnia books. On the plus side, the story is stronger and CS Lewis manages to keep his blatant editorializing to a minimum (maybe because none of the characters are transplants from wartime London). But holy crap, the modern reader will find his racist descriptions pretty hard to swallow. He reintroduces his devious, smelly, turban-clad race, the Calormen. A lost white boy is raised among them and he is sad until he is finally reunited with the beautiful white people of Narnia. I've read an argument that Lewis isn't *really* racist because he portrays one Calormene character in a positive light. But that's like Sarah Palin gushing about her gay friends to prove she's not homophobic. Inviting a lesbian coworker to your annual moose BBQ is not enough to overcome an active campaign against gay rights. For Lewis, commenting that one Calormene lady is a good storyteller is not enough to over come the contempt he feels towards his own Arab stand-ins.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Markus

    I feel really guilty about loving this book as much as I do. I loved it as a kid and I love it now, and there is just so much wrong with it. The xenophobia is positively racist -- by page 5, we're already hearing the first of many references to the fact that the residents of Narnia are considered by the residents of their southern neighbor, Calormen, to be "fair and white...accursed but beautiful barbarians." The Calormenes, on the other hand, are nothing but walking Middle Eastern stereotypes. I feel really guilty about loving this book as much as I do. I loved it as a kid and I love it now, and there is just so much wrong with it. The xenophobia is positively racist -- by page 5, we're already hearing the first of many references to the fact that the residents of Narnia are considered by the residents of their southern neighbor, Calormen, to be "fair and white...accursed but beautiful barbarians." The Calormenes, on the other hand, are nothing but walking Middle Eastern stereotypes. They wear turbans and have long beards and speak in overblown wise old sayings like, "Has not one of the poets said, 'Natural affection is stronger than soup and offspring more precious than carbuncles?'" This aspect of the story is ridiculously, inexcusably bad. As I've mentioned in reviews of other Narnia books, Lewis seems to take great pride in backing the wrong horse at every possible social and/or historical point, and boy howdy, does he blow it here. He puts his last dollar down on good old colonialist "Hey, look! Savages! If only they had a civilized country to tell them what to do!" (This should not be taken as me buying into moral relativism and excusing the very real sexism and lack of democracy running rampant through the real Middle East, by the way. It's me thinking that those weren't exactly the things that bothered Lewis about that region.) So: knowing all that, how can I possibly enjoy this book? I cringe at times, but I do. Lewis has some of his most memorable lines and greatest moral triumphs in this story. For instance, I once wrote an article and later created an e-card featuring this terrific line: "If you do one good deed, your reward usually is to be set to do another and harder and better one." It's true. It's one of the horrible unfairnesses of life, but there it is. And when you see life in those terms, you're better able to bow your head to the deeds that are your lot. It isn't fair. It just is. I also love when Hwin, the gentle nervous motherly talking horse, speaks up to Bree (another talking horse) when he insists they should take a break before setting out on a march. Time is short and the enemy is almost at the gate, but he wants a snack and a rest and a rubdown first. More than that -- he thinks he needs them. "'P-please,' said Hwin, very shyly, 'I feel just like Bree that I can't go on. But when Horses have humans (with spurs and things) on their backs, aren't they often made to go on when they're feeling like this? and then they find they can.'" This is true both morally and physically. How often do we get to what we think is the breaking point -- the point where we simply Can. NOT. Go on. And then, if we don't give in but push ourselves a little harder, we learn the difference between what we think we need and what we're really capable of. Because of course Hwin turns out to be right, and Bree's wrongness almost ruins everything. I didn't understand this when I read it for the first time, but I remembered it. And now I think about it all the time, whether I'm running a hill or writing a few more words (or any words at all on a day I could have sworn I was too tired to get some writing done). There are too many outstanding examples like this to resist. And as always, Lewis nails the little moments we can all relate to, even if we've never quite experienced them. Like when Shasta, waiting anxiously for his friends alone in the dark among some ancient tombs, hears a terrible noise. After almost jumping out of his skin, he realizes it's a distant horn blowing for the closing of the city gates: "'Don't be a silly little coward,' said Shasta to himself. 'Why, it's only the same noise you heard this morning.' But there is a great difference between a noise heard letting you in with your friends in the morning, and a noise heard alone at nightfall, shutting you out." And then, later, when the two main character children (Shasta and Aravis) are riding across the desert: "On again, trot and walk and trot, jingle-jingle-jingle, squeak-squeak-squeak, smell of hot horse, smell of hot self, blinding glare, headache. And nothing at all different for mile after mile." Such brilliantly understated word-painting. Oh, and one last passage, a short one and one of my favorites ever: "One of the drawbacks about adventures is that when you come to the most beautiful places you are often too anxious and hurried to appreciate them." So, yes, this book is bad. And yes, I love it. Because it's great, too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This is my third journey into the lands of Narnia as I have been reading the series in chronological rather than publication order. With probably the most intriguing title of the series, this was the tale I was most excited for, but it ultimately didn't live up the magic of the previous two books, for me. This is the first book in the series not set from the perspective of someone entering Narnia from the human real. I still enjoyed it, though it is not what I thought it would be and, as such, i This is my third journey into the lands of Narnia as I have been reading the series in chronological rather than publication order. With probably the most intriguing title of the series, this was the tale I was most excited for, but it ultimately didn't live up the magic of the previous two books, for me. This is the first book in the series not set from the perspective of someone entering Narnia from the human real. I still enjoyed it, though it is not what I thought it would be and, as such, it lost a lot of the mystical and magical qualities that pervaded the previous stories. This tale surrounds a young boy, Sashta, and his talking horse, Bree, in a heroic type, rags-to-riches tale. Coming from bordering savage lands, the duo traverse cities and deserts to flee the slavery that would otherwise await them. Along their journey they meet a similar pair of escapees, Avaris and talking horse Hwin, who join them on their adventures. Characters from the previous tale made a reappearance in their new roles as Kings and Queens of Narnia and it was exciting to see how the characters had progressed. The adventurous elements of the story were high and seeing more of this magical realm was a real joy, but I lost some of my suspended belief in reading this. With no connection to the human world, this still made for pleasing but not enchanting reading. My largest grievance with this tale was that I felt it relied on the stereotype of the savage other and incorporated some racist elements that might have been acceptable for the time it was published but jarred with me, as a modern-day reader. I could not forgive the book this sin and it dramatically lessened my enjoyment. I see few other reviews with similar statements so perhaps this was only my interpretation of the text but, nevertheless, the feeling that the stereotypes were somewhat misplaced continued to niggle at me as I read this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ Queen of Literary Trash, Protector of Out-of-Print Gems, Khaleesi of Bodice Rippers, Mother of Smut, the Unrepentant, Breaker of Convention ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest To cure a book slump, I decided to revisit the Chronicles of Narnia series. I grew up with the books as a kid, but I'd never actually finished the series to completion. Conveniently, I happen to own a stack of them that I purchased from a thrift shop a few years ago on a whim. To make things extra interesting, I'm reading the books in chronological order instead of publication order, which means that some of the lesser-known books like THE Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest To cure a book slump, I decided to revisit the Chronicles of Narnia series. I grew up with the books as a kid, but I'd never actually finished the series to completion. Conveniently, I happen to own a stack of them that I purchased from a thrift shop a few years ago on a whim. To make things extra interesting, I'm reading the books in chronological order instead of publication order, which means that some of the lesser-known books like THE MAGICIAN'S NEPHEW & THE HORSE AND HIS BOY come before the better-known sequels like PRINCE CASPIAN. THE HORSE AND HIS BOY is set during the time period when Lucy, Susan, Edmund, and Peter were ruling Narnia after defeating the White Witch, but for most of the book it isn't actually set in Narnia, but Calormen, one of the other countries. The hero of this book is a boy named Shasta who lives with an abusive father. When he learns that his "father" plans to sell him off to a racial stereotype of an evil Middle Eastern man, called a Tarkaan (which seems to be fantasy-speak for "Turk"), he decides to run off with the man's horse. Shasta finds out that the horse, whose name is Bree, was born in Narnia and can talk. Soon, he finds himself pursued by an assailant on horseback - until he finds out said assailant is a girl, and then he's like, "Hyuk, hyuk, you're a girl, wow, I'm not afraid of you anymore." The girl's name is Aravis and her horse, who is also from Narnia and can also talk, is named Hwin. Aravis is escaping her fate as a child bride to another Middle Eastern stereotype. Their flight takes them to the capital of Calormen, which is called Tashbaan. There, Shasta discovers a plot by the son of the king there to bridenap Susan, and he calls her a whore a couple times (literally "false jade" but we all know what he means), before announcing his plans to conquer first Archenland (another one of the lesser-known countries in Narnia-land) and then Narnia itself. In a GAME OF THRONES-esque twist, the prince's father says he's totally okay with this and will totally support him if he succeeds, but if the plan fails, he's going to deny knowledge of it and basically destroy his future to punish him. The prince agrees, because he's so certain his evil plan will work. Spoiler: his evil plan does not work. Aslan also makes an appearance and if you thought he was a judgy sh*t in THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE, just wait until you see him bring the punishment in THE HORSE AND HIS BOY. He scratches up Aravis's back to punish her for getting her evil stepmother's spy whipped, even though the spy was helping to make her life miserable and being complicit in Aravis's being married off as a child bride. He also punishes Prince Rapadash (the one who wanted to rape Susan) by turning him into a donkey and then basically putting him under house arrest by cursing him so that if he ever ventures more than ten miles past his homeland, he will never be able to assume his human form again. That's pretty harsh considering that none of the other bad people in this book get punished and it seems like Aslan's only bringing the pain because Rapadash threatened one of his favorites - kind of like that soccer mom who bursts into the principal's office screaming "NOT MY CHILD!" at any sort of real or imagined slight, and yet never attends any PTA meetings. Also, apparently he can shape-shift. If not for the appearance of Aslan, I never would have believed this book to be a part of the Narnia cannon. It's pretty to see why this book never got a movie adaptation. The Pevensie children appear only briefly - and not as children, but adults. The focus is on characters who, to my knowledge, never appear again in the narrative. Plus, the weird bridenapping plot and Middle Eastern stereotypes make it feel like C.S. Lewis got really drunk and forgot he was writing a fantasy novel for kids, got halfway through a bodice ripper, remembered what he was doing, and then finished it with a neat, children's parable-type morality-heavy ending without taking out any of the bodice-rippery elements. Don't get me wrong - I thought this book was hi-larious, but I love bodice-rippers and entertained to see a portray of a Middle East-type setting that appeared to borrow heavily from E.M. Hull's THE SHEIK (while employing the same amount of cultural sensitivity, to boot). That said, THE HORSE AND HIS BOY is entirely skippable. 3.5 stars

  7. 5 out of 5

    Roya

    You know you're bored when it nearly takes you a month to read something of this length.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Barry Pierce

    Ugh, this is the worst episode of Mister Ed ever.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Horse and his Boy (Chronicles of Narnia, #5), C.S. Lewis تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ژانویه سال 2002 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 5: پسر و اسبش؛ اثر: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس؛ مترجم: بهروز وحدت؛ نوشه، 1378؛ در 202 ص؛ شابک: 9649033815؛ عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 5: اسب و آدمش؛ اثر: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس؛ مترجم: منوچهر کریم زاده؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ کتابهای کیمیا، 1379؛ در 205 ص؛ شابک: 9647100116؛ چاپ سوم 1386؛ عنوان: اسب و پسرک او؛ نویسنده: سی.اس. لوئیس؛ مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان؛ تهران، قدیانی، 138 The Horse and his Boy (Chronicles of Narnia, #5), C.S. Lewis تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ژانویه سال 2002 میلادی عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 5: پسر و اسبش؛ اثر: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس؛ مترجم: بهروز وحدت؛ نوشه، 1378؛ در 202 ص؛ شابک: 9649033815؛ عنوان: ماجراهای نارنیا - کتاب 5: اسب و آدمش؛ اثر: کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس؛ مترجم: منوچهر کریم زاده؛ منوچهر کریم زاده؛ کتابهای کیمیا، 1379؛ در 205 ص؛ شابک: 9647100116؛ چاپ سوم 1386؛ عنوان: اسب و پسرک او؛ نویسنده: سی.اس. لوئیس؛ مترجم: پیمان اسماعیلیان؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 280 ص؛ چاپ سوم 1394؛ شابک: 9789644178511؛ کلاویو استیپلز لوئیس 1898 - 1963 مترجم: امید اقتداری متولد 1330 / منوچهر کریم زاده متولد 1328، کتابهای کیمیا، تهران خیابان ولی عصر، بالاتر از میدان ونک، شماره 1337 این کتاب، داستان ماجرایی است که در نارنیا و کالورمن و سرزمینهای بین آنها، در روزگار طلایی که پیتر، شاه بزرگ نارنیا، و برادر و دو خواهرش، شاه و ملکه های تحت فرمان او بودند، رخ داد. ص 1 کتاب. ا. شربیانی

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    The boxed set of Narnia that I have and am now reading, was published in 2002 I have noticed, so despite having 1950/60s covers, these were NOT my original Narnia books from the early 70s. I wonder where my originals went and when I bought these ?? Who knows, what I do know is that it’s strange, I could not remember a single thing about this book, I don’t think I have ever read it. That said it was very enjoyable, a fun romp through the countries bordering Narnia with an interesting mix of people The boxed set of Narnia that I have and am now reading, was published in 2002 I have noticed, so despite having 1950/60s covers, these were NOT my original Narnia books from the early 70s. I wonder where my originals went and when I bought these ?? Who knows, what I do know is that it’s strange, I could not remember a single thing about this book, I don’t think I have ever read it. That said it was very enjoyable, a fun romp through the countries bordering Narnia with an interesting mix of people and animals. Aslan appears, as do some of the Pevensie children and the usual shenanigans ensue. As well written as ever and a delight to read, a solid 4 ⭐️novel.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The basic story is a good and entertaining one, but I could not get beyond the overt prejudices of C.S. Lewis on display throughout this book. I'm incredibly disappointed. His portrayal of the people of Calormen is horrid. I admit, by calor I don't known if he is implying people of the hot lands (as calor indicates heat) or if it is a not-so-subtle way of suggesting colored people, but the descriptions speak for themselves. These people are described as dark-skinned, turban-wearing, cruel slave-o The basic story is a good and entertaining one, but I could not get beyond the overt prejudices of C.S. Lewis on display throughout this book. I'm incredibly disappointed. His portrayal of the people of Calormen is horrid. I admit, by calor I don't known if he is implying people of the hot lands (as calor indicates heat) or if it is a not-so-subtle way of suggesting colored people, but the descriptions speak for themselves. These people are described as dark-skinned, turban-wearing, cruel slave-owners. Their leader is a corrupt war-monger. This land and its people are consistently contrasted against the fair-skinned, judicious and free-thinking people of Narnia and Archenland. It's not a book I would recommend. In fact, it has lessened by desire to continue reading the chronicles. This is really too bed because, other than the cultural depictions, the story idea is marvelous.

  12. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    The story is so simple but it took me awhile to appreciate what's going on because I am reading the series not in its proper sequence. I read Book #2, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe last year and now this Book #3, The Horse and His Boy without reading Book #1 The Magician's Nephew first. Reason? I misplaced my copy of Book #1 and I had to search for it. Well, it is quite hard to rate this book. It is a simple fantasy story. The horse in the title is Bree, the talking Narnian horse. He and t The story is so simple but it took me awhile to appreciate what's going on because I am reading the series not in its proper sequence. I read Book #2, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe last year and now this Book #3, The Horse and His Boy without reading Book #1 The Magician's Nephew first. Reason? I misplaced my copy of Book #1 and I had to search for it. Well, it is quite hard to rate this book. It is a simple fantasy story. The horse in the title is Bree, the talking Narnian horse. He and the boy in the title, Shasta meet when the latter is about to be sold by his foster father to a rich Calormen. They escape together and meet other escapees, a girl named Aravis and her another talking Narnian horse called Hwin. What follows is their adventure on their way back to Narnia particularly through Tasbaan which is the capital of Calormen, an enemy tribe of Narnias. This reminded me of the adventures of Magnon and Zimatar, two radio programs being played over DZRH in the 70's, when I was a young boy. The Zimatar series played for thirty minutes at 2:00-2:30 p.m. and even up to now, I could still hear its theme and recall the names of its main characters like Zimatar himself and Wiwin, his powerful dwarf friend. I remember that Zimatar also has a flying white horse whose name I cannot recall anymore. When the series started, our family did not have our own radio so I had to go in front of our neighbor's house and stand by their front window to hear their radio. For the memories brought back by this book, I am rating this with a 2 stars (It's okay). I still prefer Book #2 because it has more child characters. Aslan, my favorite so far character in the series, makes just a brief appearance here. The battle between Archenlands and Narnians versus Calormen seemed to be lopsided and it was told only through the apparitions on the hermit's lake so it failed to make the match interesting to read in my opinion. Also, Aravis and Hwin were not in it plus Sashta seemed to be untrained to be seen as a big hero what with him lacking the basic skills in combat. I mean, in Book#2, Peter, Edmund, Susan and Lucy had training prior to the big battle. I thought it would have been better if Sashta was trained first so he could be a hero-warrior at the end of the book. Also, the battle could have been more exciting if the point of view was Sashta's and Aravis was there fighting together against the Calormen. I have started reading Book #1 and will read the sequence in chronological order until Book #7.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Mosley

    This is increasingly becoming one of my favourites from the Chronicles of Narnia. If asked why, I believe it is because it is the most like a medieval faerie romance. A young boy and girl in the mundane world of Calormen suddenly find themselves in the presence of faeries––talking horses––who wish to take them into Faerie itself––Narnia. Faerie, and the journey to it, however, is perilous and fraught with dangers. Once in it, or on its borders (i.e. Archenland) it becomes even more dangerous. A This is increasingly becoming one of my favourites from the Chronicles of Narnia. If asked why, I believe it is because it is the most like a medieval faerie romance. A young boy and girl in the mundane world of Calormen suddenly find themselves in the presence of faeries––talking horses––who wish to take them into Faerie itself––Narnia. Faerie, and the journey to it, however, is perilous and fraught with dangers. Once in it, or on its borders (i.e. Archenland) it becomes even more dangerous. A battle ensues and both children as well as the faeries who grew up outside of faerie meet the Faerie King himself (Aslan). Their introduction into faerie is permitted by the King and they get to live on its borders for the rest of their lives. It is an excellent story about God's grace, providence, and mystery. We too can find out we are the sons and daughters of kings, not just kings on the border of Faerie, but the Faerie King himself. I highly recommend this book, specifically when it is read in its proper place, third from last. Last read: 2012 (29-31 October) 2013 (29 April-2 May)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    One word: Orientalist. Sorry, I could not get past it - nor should I have to. This was a terrible book, full of so much imperialist racist anti-Arab/Indian tones that I could not appreciate any aspect of it. Quite frankly I couldn't believe that I was reading this garbage. I don't really care if the story is good - if it's offensive it's not good. And even then, I really didn't care for the story. The characters were completely new and it takes place during Susan/Edmund/Peter/Lucy's reign in Narni One word: Orientalist. Sorry, I could not get past it - nor should I have to. This was a terrible book, full of so much imperialist racist anti-Arab/Indian tones that I could not appreciate any aspect of it. Quite frankly I couldn't believe that I was reading this garbage. I don't really care if the story is good - if it's offensive it's not good. And even then, I really didn't care for the story. The characters were completely new and it takes place during Susan/Edmund/Peter/Lucy's reign in Narnia. The end was beyond predictable. The journey was ok. The Hermit not explained. Far too much polarizing with the genders as well. Everything that I had given slack for in the previous novels was forgotten in this one. The writing, the "presently" scattered over every page. I could only look at this book critically. I couldn't get past the barbaric, turban-wearing, dark-skinned, slave-owning, women-stealing men depicted in this book. Thank you C.S.Lewis for combining the images of both Arabs & Indians into this book and demonizing them, creating yet ANOTHER conflicted representation of two completely different types of people. Of using incorrect representation and assumptions regarding these cultures to create an enemy for your Christian Land, Narnia. I had a problem with Aladdin, and I have a problem with this book. Both dictate a stereotypical image and portrayal of characters & values that are offensive. Perfect book to use for orientalism and imperialism embedded within Children's books (much like Alice in Wonderland). They set up Calormen (questionable meaning) completely opposite to Narnia, again pretty much drawing this nice and clean line between these coloured barbarians from the south and civilized free white folk. The sentiment is present in all the novels I've read so far but nothing as strong and overt as this. I couldn't believe it. Especially given the time period there was some forward thinking happening by then. I don't know what else to say. I would not recommend this to any one, in fact I would never want to ever read this book again. I probably will burn it when I get near an open fire.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Piyangie

    The Horse and His Boy is a good adventure story in the Chronicles. Here the adventure begins in Calormen, a coastal country south to Narnia. Two children, Shasta, a young boy who believes him to be kidnapped from Narnia and Aravis, a noble Calormene girl both make their escape from the Calormen - the boy to avoid being sold as a slave and the girl to avoid being forced to marry an old man. The story is mostly about their adventures as they make their escape and safe passage to Narnian territory. The Horse and His Boy is a good adventure story in the Chronicles. Here the adventure begins in Calormen, a coastal country south to Narnia. Two children, Shasta, a young boy who believes him to be kidnapped from Narnia and Aravis, a noble Calormene girl both make their escape from the Calormen - the boy to avoid being sold as a slave and the girl to avoid being forced to marry an old man. The story is mostly about their adventures as they make their escape and safe passage to Narnian territory. This adventure takes place while Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy rule Narnia as kings and queens, and they take a minor part in the story as well. The story has action and is filled with suspense. It also conveys a message of the importance in being kind (both toward human and animals), helpful and humble. The story also dwells on both Middle Eastern and Western cultures through Calormen and Narnia respectively. The contrast on the people, their beahviour and conduct, and their beliefs and way of thinking add colour and made the read more interesting. The book has been criticized as being racist, but I think Lewis was trying to be true to the life as it was centuries ago in those countries. There were slavery in those countries too as it was in the western world, and there were child marriages in their cultures. I admit that it is a little difficult to stomach the antagonism that was created and worded between the two cultures, but the history holds many such instances which eventually led to wars and one cannot blame Lewis for being influenced by history to create a story. Overall, it was a good and engaging read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    (As with all the Narnia books, I read this years ago, but am rereading it now.) I have to say, having now reread all of the Narnia books except for The Last Battle, that this is my favorite. It's coherent, exciting, and has likeable characters. I even found Aslan much more likeable in this one; I think it's because he does less scolding and more helping, and he's better integrated into the plot than in, say, Prince Caspian. I've also decided that I kind of like Lewis' weird semi-omniscient talks-t (As with all the Narnia books, I read this years ago, but am rereading it now.) I have to say, having now reread all of the Narnia books except for The Last Battle, that this is my favorite. It's coherent, exciting, and has likeable characters. I even found Aslan much more likeable in this one; I think it's because he does less scolding and more helping, and he's better integrated into the plot than in, say, Prince Caspian. I've also decided that I kind of like Lewis' weird semi-omniscient talks-to-the-reader narration. At least twice in this book, he says something like "Shasta had never seen so many trees before. If you had been there, you would have known they were [names of tree species here:] . . ." or "Shasta smelled a delicious smell he had never smelled before, but I hope that you have." At one point, he says that Shasta would not have planned to cross the desert "if he had read as many books about deserts as you have." That kind of cracked me up. Still, it's all sort of charming and does draw you into the story, I think, by making you actually consider these things more as you would if you were there. Also nice, this books seems much less sexist than some of the others. Half of the four most important characters (for much of the story, anyway) are female, and if Shasta is nobler than Aravis (who is still admirably loyal and resourceful), Hwin is a nobler horse than Bree, so it balances pretty well. Queen Lucy is also pretty cool, though I wasn't a fan of Corin's "Lucy is as good as a man, or at any rate as good as a boy," comment. But then, I remembered as I read that I never was much of a fan of Corin at all - his whole character seems devoted to "knocking people down." There's definitely some glorification of battle - Shasta has to learn to conduct himself in battle, when I always thought it was a shame that Corin made him go in the first place when he didn't want to. Still, all in all, a good book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Els

    Have I mentioned how much I love these books recently? And Aravis is just like me. In all the wrong ways.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ziba

    The Horse and His Boy is the only book of the Narnia series that features native rather than English children as the main characters, and the only one set entirely in the Narnian world. It is set in the period covered by the last chapter of the inaugural book, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, during the reign of the four Pevensie children as Kings and Queens of Narnia. Though the Pevensies appear as minor characters, the main characters are two children and two talking horses who escape fr The Horse and His Boy is the only book of the Narnia series that features native rather than English children as the main characters, and the only one set entirely in the Narnian world. It is set in the period covered by the last chapter of the inaugural book, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, during the reign of the four Pevensie children as Kings and Queens of Narnia. Though the Pevensies appear as minor characters, the main characters are two children and two talking horses who escape from Calormen north into Narnia. Loved it, very different from the other books in the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    The Horse and His Boy was one of my favorite chronicles of Narnia when I was younger — partly because I love all things oriental, and the setting of Calormen is Lewis’s quasi-Arabian society — but more importantly, because of the heroine Aravis. The young Calormene aristocrat, a ‘tarkheena’ as she is titled, is a singular character in the Lewis mythology: here, for once, the author shows us that he is capable of envisioning a female who is neither a mild-mannered English girl, nor an evil sorcer The Horse and His Boy was one of my favorite chronicles of Narnia when I was younger — partly because I love all things oriental, and the setting of Calormen is Lewis’s quasi-Arabian society — but more importantly, because of the heroine Aravis. The young Calormene aristocrat, a ‘tarkheena’ as she is titled, is a singular character in the Lewis mythology: here, for once, the author shows us that he is capable of envisioning a female who is neither a mild-mannered English girl, nor an evil sorceress. The indomitable Aravis, wearing her brother’s armor, rides off into the night to escape marriage to the disgustingly old and corrupt Ahoshta Tarkhaan. Prepared to end her own life rather than submit, she is persuaded not to commit suicide by her talking horse, of all things (very Lewis), and resolves to escape to Narnia instead. In Aravis, we see Lewis’ incarnation of Scheherezade from One Thousand and One Nights, of course — and possibly a little bit of Mulan, though that might be a mere coincidence. Unfortunately, there Lewis’s brief excursion into actually respecting female power and other cultures comes to an end. After all — Aravis isn’t Narnian. And the penalty, of course, for not being born into the group of privileged white people known as the “Sons of Adam” and “Daughters of Eve” is that somehow, for some reason, you aren’t as inherently good. Aravis is accused by both Shasta (who is, for all intents and purposes, a Narnian boy) and Aslan of being unempathetic. During her escape, she drugs a slave in order to escape — knowing that said slave will likely be beaten for oversleeping. Later, Aslan claws her back — actually inflicts physical violence upon her — he says, to atone for the lashings that her slave must have endured. Is that really fair? Should Aravis have really stayed in Calormen, enduring marriage to a sniveling man 4 times her age, just to avoid causing hurt to a slave that will likely be hurt on a regular basis anyway? Does Aslan follow Shasta around and inflict a punishment for every sin the boy has committed? Is Edmund, who gives up his sisters and brother to the White Witch (in the previous chronicle) ever punished for his crimes? No, Aslan takes the blame for good little Northern boys. Not Aravis, though. She’s not allowed to get away with even the slightest blemish on her character. I find Lewis’s Calormenes (and the Chronicles’ clear bias against them) interesting, as far as his pathological narrow-mindedness is concerned. Throughout The Horse and His Boy, the Calormenes and Calormene culture are referred to with scorn and contempt — particularly by the Narnian warhorse, Bree. They’re rather one-dimensionally depicted; tyrannical, superstitious, idolatrous, vain… Commoners are “men with long, dirty robes, and wooden shoes turned up at the toe, and turbans on their heads, and beards, talking to one another very slowly about things that sounded dull”; the nobility are “mostly impressive, rather than agreeable to look at.” No reason is given as to why this country –which, presumably, was created by Aslan just as well as Narnia and Archenland were — turned out so badly. Perhaps he implies that religion is to blame for their unjust society; their pagan worship of the god Tash and other deities, like Zardeenah, clearly sets them at odds with the authority of Aslan. Have they just, over the years, lost their way? Maybe that is what Lewis intended…? But it just doesn’t seem like an adequate explanation. The other protagonist, Shasta, is a boy of Northern descent who just happens to be raised in Calormen — and somehow he escapes the inherent moral corruption of his cruel and greedy “father,” Arsheesh. Aravis’s steelness of character can’t merely be explained by wealth and nobility, since poor, Calormene fishermen apparently have it, too. Bree, the Narnian horse spells it out for us in the first chapter: Shasta is different, Shasta yearns to go North, “because of the blood that is in him.” Whatever moral arguments Lewis tries to make to rationalize the bad character of Calormenes… It seems to me that their main flaw is apparently not being European. It’s a matter of race, not deservedness; and Lewis dispenses worth preferentially to protagonists of his own ethnicity. For what is Narnia, besides… WWII allied forces? Aravis’s suicide attempt certainly has something Japanese about it. But I digress, that’s for another piece.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carmen de la Rosa

    Este libro esta basado cuando los niños de Pevensie todavía están en Narnia, pero el foco está en dos niños jóvenes de Calormene, Shasta y Aravis. Ambos huyen: buscan una vida mejor en Narnia, involucrándose en una batalla entre los Narnianos y los Calormenes. El caballo y el muchacho es una historia convincente que es a la vez encantadora y llena de fantasía y aventura y creo que puede ser apreciado tanto por adultos como por niños. Bellamente escrito, incluso intrigante. Me quedé encantada con Este libro esta basado cuando los niños de Pevensie todavía están en Narnia, pero el foco está en dos niños jóvenes de Calormene, Shasta y Aravis. Ambos huyen: buscan una vida mejor en Narnia, involucrándose en una batalla entre los Narnianos y los Calormenes. El caballo y el muchacho es una historia convincente que es a la vez encantadora y llena de fantasía y aventura y creo que puede ser apreciado tanto por adultos como por niños. Bellamente escrito, incluso intrigante. Me quedé encantada con el entorno, el ambiente y el maravilloso complejo y encantadores personajes que conocí a lo largo del camino. Me ha gustado mucho la aventura de este libro. La tercera parte me resultó muy entretenida. El final es lo único negativo ya que para mi estuvo demasiado precipitado y rápido.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elaina

    I enjoyed this one so much! I loved Shasta, Bree, Aravis....everyone!! It was different than the others, but I still liked it a lot! I have no idea which is my favorite Chronicles of Narnia book now haha I just started reading the Magician's Nephew a couple days ago and I'm loving it so far! I've been reading so many books lately and it's hard to keep track of all of them...I should have written a review sooner, but I've been a little busy with school when I haven't been reading ;) lol So sorry I enjoyed this one so much! I loved Shasta, Bree, Aravis....everyone!! It was different than the others, but I still liked it a lot! I have no idea which is my favorite Chronicles of Narnia book now haha I just started reading the Magician's Nephew a couple days ago and I'm loving it so far! I've been reading so many books lately and it's hard to keep track of all of them...I should have written a review sooner, but I've been a little busy with school when I haven't been reading ;) lol So sorry this isn't a proper review, but it's safe to say I love every book in this series so far! :D

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mario

    Not my favorite in the series, but it was still really fun read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ian D

    Τρίτο μέρος της επταλογίας (αν το πάρουμε με χρονολογική σειρά - πέμπτο με σειρά ημερομηνίας έκδοσης) κι αυτή τη φορά η ιστορία διαδραματίζεται εξολοκλήρου στο φανταστικό σύμπαν της Νάρνια. Τα χαρακτηριστικά που μας έκαναν να αγαπήσουν το C.S. Lewis είναι παρόντα, βρήκα όμως το αποτέλεσμα λίγο πιο αδύναμο αν όχι αδιάφορο, σα να γράφτηκε λίγο στα πρόχειρα και όχι γιατί η ιστορία ήταν απαραίτητη στο Χρονικό.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    The third book in the Chronicles of Narnia, " The Horse and his Boy is the somewhat familiar storyline of an orphan who sets out on an adventure with the help of a few friends and discovers "who they really are." Susan, Peter, Edmund, Lucy and Aslan all make an appearance, but this is ultimately the story of Shasta, his talking horse, Bree, and the folks they meet along the way. I never felt completely immersed in the tale and that probably stems from the predictable nature of the story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jesica

    By The Lion’s Mane, this book is good!! Maybe it’s my favorite in the whole series. I wonder why did I skip this one the first time I read this series? I should have read this book sooner >.< This book is unique among the other Narnia books. It’s not actually the third in the series chronologically since it sets during The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. It’s an untold story of how the Narnia doing during the golden age when Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy ruled Narnia. And the story is no By The Lion’s Mane, this book is good!! Maybe it’s my favorite in the whole series. I wonder why did I skip this one the first time I read this series? I should have read this book sooner >.< This book is unique among the other Narnia books. It’s not actually the third in the series chronologically since it sets during The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. It’s an untold story of how the Narnia doing during the golden age when Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy ruled Narnia. And the story is not even revolves around Narnia. It tells of a stable boy far on Calormen named Shasta. He then met a Talking Horse of Narnia, Bree, who had been captured and enslaved too. Together they escaped and met another escaping pair, Aravis and a Talking mare, Hwin. As the four of them got to Tashbaan, the capital of Calormen, Shasta was mistaken for Corin, the prince of Archenland and taken in by king Edmund and Narnian party who were visiting Tashbaan. They overheard a Calormen secret meeting and found out the Calormen king’s evil plot to take over Archenland and Narnia and Shasta, Aravis, Bree and Hwin must stop war between Narnia and Archenland against treacherous Calormen. Though there is not much of Narnia, the adventure of this book is great. And I get to know how are the Narnian during the peaceful time. It’s funny when Shasta tried to warn the Talking beasts of the incoming war but being at peace for so long, the Talking Beasts were so slow to process that their neighboring lands were at war. Edmund and Lucy’s characters were also developed much since The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and they were more like king and queen. Well over all this book is a fun read. One of the best classic I’ve read, I think.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)

    This might be my favorite book in the CoN. I love it so very, very much. It's just dang good storytelling.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Selene Matheson

    4.5 Stars Book Three in my Box Set

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    LOL WHY DID IT TAKE ME SO LONG TO READ THIS BOOK. Possibly because the first three quarters of this book was INCREDIBLY SLOW AND DRAGGED OUT AND POINTLESS?? Don't get me wrong, y'all. I love C.S. Lewis and Narnia is perfection...but that's part of the reason why this book puzzled me. All the characters were beautifully vivid and the sassy banter (especially between Aravis and Shasta) was ON POINT. But wow there were so many places where I was nearly falling asleep. Between the incredibly confusi LOL WHY DID IT TAKE ME SO LONG TO READ THIS BOOK. Possibly because the first three quarters of this book was INCREDIBLY SLOW AND DRAGGED OUT AND POINTLESS?? Don't get me wrong, y'all. I love C.S. Lewis and Narnia is perfection...but that's part of the reason why this book puzzled me. All the characters were beautifully vivid and the sassy banter (especially between Aravis and Shasta) was ON POINT. But wow there were so many places where I was nearly falling asleep. Between the incredibly confusing names and long historical explanations about kinds and princes and lands I WAS VERY CONFUSE MY FREN. I feel like the story didn't really pick up the pace until it was almost over. So that's why I'm very begrudgingly giving this book 3 stars. BECAUSE I REALLY LIKED IT BUT BRO IT WAS LIKE MUNCHING ON A SLEEPING PILL. Now can we talk about Aravis and Shasta?? BECAUSE I SHIP THEM SO HARD. After adventuring through the wilderness of the North together how can they possibly NOT be meant to be?? Aravis' sarcasm gave me life and Shasta was just a delicate little cinnamon roll and Bree was fabulously full of himself and Hwin was ridiculously cute and TBH THE WHOLE CAST OF THIS BOOK DESERVES AWARDS FOR BEING SO COOL. So basically I have mixed emotions about this book but Narnia will always be fabulous. End of story. "Now, Bree," he said, "you poor, proud frightened Horse, draw near. Nearer still, my son. Do not dare not to dare. Touch me. Smell me. Here are my paws, here is my tail. I am a true Beast." "Aslan," said Bree in a shaken voice, "I'm afraid I must be rather a fool." "Happy the Horse who knows that while he is still young."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily Crowe

    I'm torn with my rating. I read this book at least a dozen times growing up and I always loved it, and I just finished listening to a rather fine audio production of it, which I enjoyed. But it's hard for me to separate my nostalgia for this book from a critical evaluation of the story. Oh, Jack. You have no great love for women, do you? Or at least not until Joy Gresham came into your life. If you'd known her earlier, I think your female characters would have benefitted so much! Aravis is one of I'm torn with my rating. I read this book at least a dozen times growing up and I always loved it, and I just finished listening to a rather fine audio production of it, which I enjoyed. But it's hard for me to separate my nostalgia for this book from a critical evaluation of the story. Oh, Jack. You have no great love for women, do you? Or at least not until Joy Gresham came into your life. If you'd known her earlier, I think your female characters would have benefitted so much! Aravis is one of the truly interesting female characters that C. S. Lewis gave us: she's smart, savvy, sporty, refined, and of high birth. She's a snob, but also a loyal companion. Like Edmund and Eustace from previous books in the series, she also grows as a character by the time we reach the end of her story. She is, truly, a female figure in the Narnia books I can whole-heartedly cheer for. So is Shasta, come to that. And Lewis himself is a fine, fine storyteller, with a good sense of narration, pace, and character. he never talks down to his audience (I remember learning a lot of words for the first time by reading the Narnia Chronicles in elementary school). But there is such a strong sense of patriarchal imperialism (not to mention an anti-Arabic sentiment)running through these books that it makes my heart hurt a little bit.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Franco Santos

    Mi favorito de la saga. En mi opinión es la mejor aventura. Un tomo que me resultó muy entretenido y el cual amé hasta las entrañas por ese viaje tan humano y a la vez tan fantástico. El final es lo único negativo que le encontré: demasiado precipitado y rápido.

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