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The BFG (In Russian language) PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The BFG (In Russian language)
Author: Roald Dahl
Publisher: Published by Rosman (first published 1982)
ISBN: 9785353019237
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Captured by a giant! The BFG is no ordinary bone-crunching giant. He is far too nice and jumbly. It's lucky for Sophie that he is. Had she been carried off in the middle of the night by the Bloodbottler, the Fleshlumpeater, the Bonecruncher, or any of the other giants-rather than the BFG-she would have soon become breakfast. When Sophie hears that they are flush-bunking of Captured by a giant! The BFG is no ordinary bone-crunching giant. He is far too nice and jumbly. It's lucky for Sophie that he is. Had she been carried off in the middle of the night by the Bloodbottler, the Fleshlumpeater, the Bonecruncher, or any of the other giants-rather than the BFG-she would have soon become breakfast. When Sophie hears that they are flush-bunking off in England to swollomp a few nice little chiddlers, she decides she must stop them once and for all. And the BFG is going to help her!

30 review for The BFG (In Russian language)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petra X

    Do you know what the BFG stood for before his publisher told him he had to think of other words for the acronym? Dahl wasn't joking either, not at all. This story is of a man's interest in a prepubescent girl. The first thing he does is enter her bedroom in the middle of the night, blow "dust" over her and kidnap her. Taking her away from the orphanage she lives in to the land of the extremely unfriendly giants who, in the original draft forced the little girl to look at their giant 'clubs'. But Do you know what the BFG stood for before his publisher told him he had to think of other words for the acronym? Dahl wasn't joking either, not at all. This story is of a man's interest in a prepubescent girl. The first thing he does is enter her bedroom in the middle of the night, blow "dust" over her and kidnap her. Taking her away from the orphanage she lives in to the land of the extremely unfriendly giants who, in the original draft forced the little girl to look at their giant 'clubs'. But the BFG's different, he's friendly....(view spoiler)[grooming (hide spoiler)] It all ends with the little girl giving the BFG kisses and living next door to him and everyone is very happy. Dahl sees himself as the BFG giving Sophie, children, a new way to think, different from human adults, who don't even believe in giants. It is an inventive story without doubt, and all fairy stories require you to absolutely suspend disbelief. Lots of them include sexual and violent elements which children either don't notice (sexual) or thoroughly enjoy (violent). When Disney gets hold of them, they lose both and become the anodyne Barbie-doll princesses (cue violins-in-the-background) we are used to. In that tradition, the BFG succeeds. In the mid-to-late 20thC there was less emphasis on paedophilia than there is now, and I wonder if this book could have been written at all in the 21stC. Ironically, this book is banned in some educational districts in the US for 'teaching poor moral values' and cannibalism. Ridiculous. Children laugh at those sort of things. I don't believe in banning books, but Dahl was an unpleasant character and it is wilful blindness to ignore the feet of clay our heroes sometimes have as we place laurel wreaths on their brows. Misogyny: Dahl's misogyny, especially in his adult stories, is quite extreme, and, in shades of Harper Lee and Go Set a Watchman being turned into To Kill a Mockingbird at the publisher's insistence, the first draft of Matilda: "Painted the protagonist as a devilish little hussy who only later becomes "clever", perhaps because she found herself without very much to do after torturing her parents."Dahl's editor Stephen Roxburgh completely revised Dahl's last novel and, in doing so, turned it into his most popular book." Anti semitism,: " In a 1983 interview with the New Statesman, he said, “There is a trait in the Jewish character that does provoke animosity, maybe it’s a kind of lack of generosity towards non-Jews. I mean, there’s always a reason why anti-anything crops up anywhere; even a stinker Hitler didn’t just pick on them for no reason. I mean, if you and I were in a line moving towards what we knew were gas chambers, I’d rather have a go at taking one of the guards with me; but they [the Jews] were always submissive.” Buzzfeed Racism and rudeness. Remember the Oompah-Loompahs? The NAACP objected that in "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," the manual labor, performed by characters called Oompa-Loompas, are described by Dahl as African Pygmies, essentially brought-over slaves running the chocolate factory. Look at the original illustrations for the first edition of the book on Bidnessetc In the BFG, one of the giants, the Fleshlumpeater is supposed a black character, certainly another of them likes eating Turkish people. There is also a discussion on Bignessetc on his general misogyny and unpleasant character leading his publishing company, Knopf, who made a lot of money from him to write, "You have behaved to us in a way I can honestly say is unmatched in my experience for overbearingness and utter lack of civility." Dahl used to belong to the only country club in South Wales that allowed Jewish members. My father and grandfather were members in their time. He once objected very loudly to the number of Jews dining there and how it fouled the atmosphere. The management threw him out and banned him. He is supposed to have done something similar at a gambling club in London with the same result! I think he worked on the principle that everyone male, white and Christian shared his views on women, non-whites and Jews. I get it here, those sort of whites say racist things to me thinking because I am white I will go along with it. My clerks, always black, say they get complaints about whites from other blacks thinking they are bound to sympathise, but they don't. But most of us aren't racist or hate any group of people. Trouble is most people aren't vocal about that in a conversation and are likely to nod and just file it away. We need always to speak out. Perhaps the best link of all to Roald Dahl is This Recording. He was without doubt a horrible person, but equally without doubt, a tremendously talented writer with an extraordinary imagination. I've enjoyed on some level all of his books and the films made of them.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    Two wrongs don’t make a right WHAT A BOOK IT WAS! What an ending it was! I can't control my emotions. I haven't felt anything like this before. I haven't read a children book like this. I am soo happy by reading this. I am soo in love with the characters. Or writing. Or everything which this book offered me. It took me little long to finish this because of my exams. Otherwise this book was soo good that I wanted to finish it in one sitting. Nevertheless, I am finished with this and I am ve Two wrongs don’t make a right WHAT A BOOK IT WAS! What an ending it was! I can't control my emotions. I haven't felt anything like this before. I haven't read a children book like this. I am soo happy by reading this. I am soo in love with the characters. Or writing. Or everything which this book offered me. It took me little long to finish this because of my exams. Otherwise this book was soo good that I wanted to finish it in one sitting. Nevertheless, I am finished with this and I am very happy. I think if I will be in the mood of re-reading, I will choose this book. OVERVIEW Sophie, an orphan, is taken away by a giant named BFG (Big Friendly Giant) as she sees him in the witching hour (a time when everyone is sleeping and giants show up). He takes her away because he is afraid that she will tell everyone and he will be in danger. BFG is a good giant. But his fellows aren't. They eat humans. But BFG don't. He considers it immoral. When Sophie learns this, she makes a plan with BFG to stop them. THINGS I LIKED => BFG. I loved him. He is uneducated. Can't speak English correctly. No giant can as they have no means of education. But I loved how BFG speaks. That's what makes him soo cute and funny. => I liked that giants called human beings: 'Human Beans' hehehe... => Giants don't eat Greek people because they taste like grease hehehe... => I liked the chapter named 'Dream'. That was pretty hilarious. I was laughing out loud while reading this chapter. => BFG called helicopters 'Bellypoppers' hehehe... => I liked how they captured the giants. That was pretty interesting. THINGS I COULDN'T LIKE => This point is not much important but I felt little bad about it. I didn't like the history of giants. But I didn't care much about it after that ending. Still it should have been better. (view spoiler)[ There are no female giants. Just males. How they were born? We don't know exactly. They just appear. What will be their end? We don't know exactly about it either. They will just disappear and nobody will know. (hide spoiler)] Regardless, I adored this book even with this fact. I highly recommend this book to everyone. Especially children must read this book. The matter with human beans,’ the BFG went on, ‘is that they is absolutely refusing to believe in anything unless they is actually seeing it right in front of their own schnozzles April 10, 2017

  3. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Don't gobblefunk around with words. This entire book was a gobblefunk of words. Snapperwhippers and babblement and crockadowndillies. My inner grumpy adult came out about 1/2 way through the book - just say what you mean! Meanings is not important, said the BFG. I cannot be right all the time. Quite often I is left instead of right. Yes, yes you were, Mr. BFG - you went left the entire book. Sophie, a little "human bean," gets up one night and spies from her window, a long spindly shape cre Don't gobblefunk around with words. This entire book was a gobblefunk of words. Snapperwhippers and babblement and crockadowndillies. My inner grumpy adult came out about 1/2 way through the book - just say what you mean! Meanings is not important, said the BFG. I cannot be right all the time. Quite often I is left instead of right. Yes, yes you were, Mr. BFG - you went left the entire book. Sophie, a little "human bean," gets up one night and spies from her window, a long spindly shape creeping around in the dark. Much to her horror, a real-life giant bounds up to her window and snatches her. He whisks her away to giant country where she learns that every night, giants steal humans for their dinner and would eat her in a heartbeat. Luckily, Sophie is stolen by the Big Friendly Giant (BFG) who truly is good, and kind, despite his propensity for murdering the English language. He would rather eat disgusting snozzcumbers than human beans and does his best to give children happy dreams. Sophie insists that the other giants must be stopped and quickly hatches a plan with the BFG - but the real question is, will the queen of England believe them? English aside, this was a very cute story. Sophie manages to be heroic without being precocious and the BFG's earnestness really cinched the plot. Audiobook Comments I listened to the enhanced audio - which came equipped with sound effects and great characterizations. If you have a hard time with the grammatical errors and deliberate misspellings, listening to the book makes it much better. The 2018 Pop Sugar Reading Challenge - A childhood classic you never read Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Like many others, I remember the Roald Dahl books that I read, or had read to me, during my childhood fondly, including Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, and especially, Matilda. Perhaps because I expected to have the same childhood reading adventure as I had with those books, I liked, but did not love, The BFG. I think that Dahl's idea for the story is a creative one, but little things, such as the puns on the names of countries when the BFG describes the taste of "h Like many others, I remember the Roald Dahl books that I read, or had read to me, during my childhood fondly, including Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, and especially, Matilda. Perhaps because I expected to have the same childhood reading adventure as I had with those books, I liked, but did not love, The BFG. I think that Dahl's idea for the story is a creative one, but little things, such as the puns on the names of countries when the BFG describes the taste of "human beans" in those countries, or what I think were stereotypical remarks at the end of the novel. For instance, when Dahl describes thankful world leaders bestowing gifts upon Sophie and the BFG for saving their people from man-eating giants, he writes that "The Rule of India sent the BFG a magnificent elephant...The King of Arabia sent them a camel each. The Lama of Tibet sent them a llama each" (pp. 204-5). However, to me, the worst line was when the Queen of England called the Sultan, "next best thing" to a Lord Mayor to ask him whether any of his subjects had mysteriously disappeared recently, and he responds, "Every night unpleasant things are happening in Baghdad...We are chopping off people's heads like you are chopping parsley" (p. 174). To be fair, the novel was copyrighted in 1982, and probably written before such things were widely considered inappropriate, and the book is widely engaging and creative. Some would also say that these things are "just jokes," that they were silliness written for the amusement of children. In spite of the fact that the novel was written over two decades ago, I do not think that children should just absorb these lines, because they are most likely reading this book at the suggestion of an adult who is, in their mind, only supposed to give them "good" books. The children would most likely read these lines and the stereotypes exoticizing non-Western countries would persist. Another niggling doubt about the book was the resolution with the giants being imprisoned in a giant pit, doomed to eat disgusting snozzcumbers for the rest of their lives. I think that Dahl was well-intentioned in including the conversation between the BFG and Sophie about how humans make their own rules, and giants make their own rules and that the rules don't coincide. When I got to this conversation, which included the the BFG basically telling Sophie that it was somewhat judgmental or short-sighted of her to immediately think of the other giants as bad, because humans, unlike giants, kill their own kind all the time, I thought that the story was incredibly promising. However, the story ended as they typically do, especially in "children's" literature, with the "bad" guys getting captured and the "good" guys living happily ever after without the moral ambiguity that Dahl touched upon in that one particular conversation between Sophie and the BFG. I think that it might have been more interesting if it was ever brought up that perhaps giants just eat humans just as humans eat bacon, sausage, and eggs, just as Sophie, the BFG, and the Queen did at the end of the story, and that perhaps the solution would be to respect all life, just as the BFG always had (before uncharacteristically eating all that bacon and sausage at the end of the novel) because he could hear the world's suffering. Instead, as I mentioned, the story has a more typical ending, and it is emotionally acceptable that the human-eating giants are imprisoned with disgusting food for the rest of their lives (and the Queen is humane for imprisoning them rather than killing them, to boot) only because Dahl portrays the giants as disgusting throughout the entire novel. Although the giants are portrayed as mean in the scene during which they toss around the BFG, emphasis is continuously on how the giants are "half-naked and disgusting" in their appearance and smell. Thus, emphasis is placed on their physical, rather than moral disgustingness, and to me, this is too reminiscent of the way that we vilify those who are different than us to justify our inhuman treatment of them. In closing, although I enjoyed this book because of Dahl's creativity in coming up with a BFG and a dreamblower, etc, I don't think that it should hold such a coveted place in children's literature because it is somewhat outdated in its attitude, and there are many, many wonderful children's adventure novels out there with which to replace it. I think that it would be a good novel to discuss with kids, but I don't think that parents/teachers should just give it to kids an example of a "good book" because remember loving it during their childhood. P.S. It's a little frustrating that people just think I'm being "oversensitive" or that I'm just another crazy person who wants everything to be PC. I don't think that my reaction to this book was knee-jerk (for instance those people who refuse to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and/or think it has no merit because of the use of the n-word). I've said many good things about this book. Heck, I even liked it. I just pointed out that I don't think that it's perfect, my reasons for not thinking that it's perfect, and that there are plenty of great books out there for kids to read, so people should at least think a millisecond about what they recommend to kids (about the content, child's maturity, and child's personal preferences) instead of just pushing their own childhood favorites on them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    There are a number of books that shape the youth of a child. This was one of those books for me, alongside a handful of other Roald Dahl classics. I remember reading it (and having my father do so as well) and getting lost in the story, which I did again today. Young Sophie finds herself unable to sleep one night at the orphanage in which she resides. Peering out the window, she sees a shadowy figure passing down the road, with an odd contraption he uses while poking his head into surround windo There are a number of books that shape the youth of a child. This was one of those books for me, alongside a handful of other Roald Dahl classics. I remember reading it (and having my father do so as well) and getting lost in the story, which I did again today. Young Sophie finds herself unable to sleep one night at the orphanage in which she resides. Peering out the window, she sees a shadowy figure passing down the road, with an odd contraption he uses while poking his head into surround windows. When Sophie spots this figure, a colossal giant, she is scooped up and taken off. Kidnapped, of a sort, Sophie learns that this giant is even larger than he appeared in the shadows, but nowhere near as frightful. That said, the odd giant patois he speaks leaves Sophie to wonder how calm and peaceful he might be. It is in the Land of the Giants that Sophie learns a little more about her captor, the Big Friendly Giant, 'BFG', and the other giant-figures in the area, who have a penchant for human flesh. Sophie also learns that the BFG possesses the ability to instil and inject dreams into the bedtime thoughts of any person, children in particular. He shoots the magic dream dust into his special pipe and, POOF, off it goes and the individual is left to stream the thoughts through their subconscious. Armed with this information, Sophie has an idea after learning from her new friend of the recent kidnapping number of children across Britain by these foul giants. They will alert this highest authority to ensure these evil giants are captured and brought to justice. Next stop, Buckingham Palace! The BFG and Sophie work together to convince the Queen, through a dream sequence, that these events have taken place and that Sophie is the key to helping find the giants. A trip into central London earns Sophie and the BFG an odd morning visit with Her Majesty, during which time all is revealed. Can the Queen use the powers at her disposal to hunt down the kidnapping giants, or will everyone be left with a taste as bitter as snozzcumbers in their mouths? Dahl takes readers on a wonderful journey through some interesting ideas to present one of the central stories known to many young Dahl readers. Perfect for any age, but especially those with an open and vivid imagination. Dahl continues to marvel with all his ideas and variances on a similar theme. Those who have read a great deal of the author will know he drops references of other books into the narrative, while always keeping things fairly unique and individualised. Dahl offers up a new set of curious characters and some completely horrible villains, as well as the amusing 'power elite' in our actual world. With much gibberish found in many of Dahl's pieces, this one is chock-full of offbeat words and giant patois, which will have the younger reader (or listener) giggling as the story continues. There is little left out in this piece that warms the heart as well as gets the its pulse elevated. Perhaps in my top five all-time, this Dahl piece is exquisite in its presentation and delivery. Kudos, Mr. Dahl for keeping me excited throughout this piece. I could not have found a better way to spend a few hours and hope to introduce these to Neo before too long. Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/

  6. 4 out of 5

    Reynita Maharani ★ The Night Reader ★

    REVIEW TO COME This is going to be a mini review. 'Sometimes, on a very clear night,' the BFG said, 'and if I is swiggling my ears in the right direction'- and here he swivelled his great ears upwards so they were facing the ceiling - 'if I is swiggling them like this and the night is very clear, I is sometimes hearing faraway music coming from the stars in the sky.' I finally read this book after leaving it standing on my bookshelf for months because I still hadn't find the right time to read it un REVIEW TO COME This is going to be a mini review. 'Sometimes, on a very clear night,' the BFG said, 'and if I is swiggling my ears in the right direction'- and here he swivelled his great ears upwards so they were facing the ceiling - 'if I is swiggling them like this and the night is very clear, I is sometimes hearing faraway music coming from the stars in the sky.' I finally read this book after leaving it standing on my bookshelf for months because I still hadn't find the right time to read it until few days ago. Few days ago I was in the mood for children books or middle grade books to help me to get over my book - hangover and so I chose to read this book. this book indeed quite helped me to get over my book - hangover and the story was quite fun but I couldn't give this book more than 3 stars because of the giant's languange. The way he spoke always confused me. like this : 'It's a trogglehumper!' he shouted. His voice was filled with fury and anguish. 'Oh, save our solos!' he cried. 'Deliver us from weasels! The devil is dancing on my dibbler!' most of the time I was confused and I was like " What ... ???? " but the story was pretty good but not really awesome in my opinion. The story didn't make my heart pounding hard but the story wasn't bad either. it was just okay. I'm sure I would've liked this book more if I had completely understood all BFG said but most of the time I didn't really understand what he said but I really loved the illustrations! they were great and I loved them. thank you for reading and liking this review. I hope you all have a great day!❤❤

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Hahahahahahahahahahahaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah

  8. 4 out of 5

    P

    I really love this book. It's pretty short but the story is very joyful. The BFG is a good giant, he intrigued me with his own language from the first. Sophie is a girl kidnapped from her bed and her adventure just begins when she and the BFG have to stop the ruthless giants before they devour all of human beans. Dahl could create the book that hooked me from the beginning and the ending of this book was so delightful, I felt very happy after I finished it. I like his writing style, it captivates I really love this book. It's pretty short but the story is very joyful. The BFG is a good giant, he intrigued me with his own language from the first. Sophie is a girl kidnapped from her bed and her adventure just begins when she and the BFG have to stop the ruthless giants before they devour all of human beans. Dahl could create the book that hooked me from the beginning and the ending of this book was so delightful, I felt very happy after I finished it. I like his writing style, it captivates me to no end. เป็นหนังสือที่น่ารักเบาสมองเล่มหนึ่ง การดำเนินเรื่องและภาษาที่ใช้มีเอกลักษณ์และจุดเด่นเหล่านี้ทำให้หนังสือสามารถคงความคลาสสิคเอาไว้ได้ถึงแม้เวลาจะผ่านไปหลายปี เจ้ายักษ์ BFG ออกมาสร้างสีสันตลอดทั้งเรื่องจนทำให้อ่านไปอมยิ้มไป ส่วนโซฟีก็พรีเซนต์ตัวละครที่อยู่ในช่วงวัยเด็กออกมาได้อย่างเหมาะสม สไตล์การเล่าเรื่องมีความคมที่เป็นเสน่ห์ของนิยาย ไม่แปลกใจเลยที่ The BFG สามารถเข้าถึงได้ทุกช่วงวัยแบบนี้ อ่านแล้วปลื้มมาก ที่นิยายเด็กธรรมดาๆ สามารถสร้างออกมาให้ดูมีมนต์ขลังมากๆขนาดนี้ (view spoiler)[ในคืนหนึ่ง โซฟีถูกยักษ์จับตัวไปจากห้องนอนของเธอ และนั่นทำให้เธอได้รู้จักกับยักษ์ใจดีที่ไม่กินคนอย่าง BFG เขาเป็นยักษ์ที่ตัวเล็กเมื่อเทียบกับเพื่อนยักษ์ตัวอื่นๆ และนอกจากนี้แล้วภาษาที่เขาใช้คุยกับโซฟีก็ยังดูแปลกประหลาดอีกด้วย BFG เป็นยักษ์ที่ทำหน้าที่สร้างฝันดีให้แก่เหล่าเด็กๆ แต่ก็มักจะโดนเพื่อนยักษ์ด้วยกันกลั่นแกล้งอยู่เสมอ เมื่อเพื่อนยักษ์ของ BFG วางแผนที่จะจับเด็กๆในโรงเรียนกิน โซฟีและ BFG จึงหาทางช่วย พวกเขาได้เดินทางไปหาราชินีแห่งอังกฤษและ BFG ได้สร้างความฝันให้แก่นาง เพื่อที่นางจะเชื่อพวกเขา ราชินีตื่นมาเจอกับโซฟีและเชื่อเรื่องเล่าเกี่ยวกับยักษ์ทั้งหมดที่เด็กน้อยเล่าให้ฟัง ราชินีจึงส่งกองกำลังรบออกไปโดยมี BFG นำทางเพื่อไปจับเหล่ายักษ์กินคนมาขังไว้ในหลุมจนได้ (hide spoiler)]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    For the most part I enjoyed this little fantasy story, but the nonsensical language was a little too bizarre at times to the point where it seemed to overwhelm the story. Otherwise though I really liked the imaginative prose and quirky characters, not to mention the resounding message to readers that imagination and friendship are both limitless. I haven't seen this book's film adaptation yet but if the story is anything to go by, I'm sure it's an entertaining film.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    A fantastic story about a misunderstood giant and a brave little girl. My kids and I loved this story but never saw the movie because we were scared to be disappointed. Dahl's stories are always full of wonderful humour and inventiveness and this was definitely one of his most imaginative. A wonderful and beautiful masterpiece.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Banny Kirsten Marie Reviews

    We have all heard the story of Jack and the beanstock, right or left? We are all familiar with stories about giants, right or left? The BFG was a story that will make people smile but also encourage them to lock their windows at night... Takeing place in the United Kingdom the BGF captures hearts all over the world and I am so thankful to Roland Dahl for publising such a sweet book that shows friendship and love. This book captured my heart as it wil yours. In London, England eight year old Sop We have all heard the story of Jack and the beanstock, right or left? We are all familiar with stories about giants, right or left? The BFG was a story that will make people smile but also encourage them to lock their windows at night... Takeing place in the United Kingdom the BGF captures hearts all over the world and I am so thankful to Roland Dahl for publising such a sweet book that shows friendship and love. This book captured my heart as it wil yours. In London, England eight year old Sophie Evans is tucked tight in bed in a girls orphanage when she hears a noise outside durning the witching hour. Sophie bravely gets out of her bed and looks out the windo and what does she see but a great big giant with a... Well a trumpet... Sophie quickly runs back to bed and covers her head when a great big hand reaches in and snatches her from her bed in the girls orphanage. Away the tall creature took her until they ended up in Giant Country... Sophie was terrified that the giant was going to eat her but the BFG turned out to be a diffrent kind of giant. The Big Friendly Giant did not eat human beans because he felt it was disgraceful and wrong but his other giant friends did. The BFG was misunderstod by the others and was often pushed around and called names. Sophie becamw the BFG's best friend and she had no choice not to live with him because she had seen him that evening in London. The BFG was a dream catcher and he liked to mix certain things to make one dream it was up to him if he wanted to make a god dream or a bad dream. One day Sophie decided it was time for the other nine giants to be stopped from eating women and children so the BFG and Sophie decided to pay the queen of England a visit and in order to do that they had to mix a nightmare for her to see what was going on in her contry. Of course i am not going to ruin the whole book for you so i am going to stop there… I can tell you that (view spoiler)[ The giants were eventualy captured and taken to England where they were forced to live in cages and eat snuzzlecumbers (view spoiler)[... In my opinion is that this book is kind of scary for children under the third grade... No child is going to want to pick up a bok about giants eating children while they are asleep in their beds. Child: Mommy is there giants outside? Mother: Of course not *Shuts out the light and closes the door* Child: *Eyes wide with fright* Neighbors Dog: Woof! Woof! Howl! Child: *Screams* Its the Bonecruncher and he is gonna eat me!!!! From the other room you and your spouse are going to be watching telivision while you rson or daughter is haveing a panic attack at the other side of the house… Why?… Because you let them read a horrifying bok like this before they were old enough. I got really engaged in the story and i personally wanted more adventure because in the end Roland Dahl speeds up the story way to much like he automaticaly wants it to end because he did not have anymore ideas. That upset me because the BFG could have been so much more adventuress and the author could have made him and little Sophie more plots. Most of the story takses place in Giant Country in the BFG's home. Lots of new words were learned for me in this story that even though are not real words i may still use them scrumdiliumptchus was one of my personal favorites… I rate the BFG with four stars for such a great one- hundred and fifty pages before slipping… The artwork was great and i loved not being able to put the story book down. My Rateing 4/5 (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ilenia Zodiaco

    Miravibondo! Fantelastico!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

    I love Roald Dahl. What wonderful children's literature he wrote. Even though its for children adults love it too. Like Enid Blyton and Beatrix Potter. Lovely easy reading. I strongly recommend all three authors.🐯👍

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Churchill

    Reread because the trailer for the upcoming movie got me all excited! Classic, love this story so much.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The BFG, Roald Dahl عنوان: غول بزرگ مهربان؛ رولد دال؛ مترجم: مهناز داوری؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، محراب قلم، 1378؛ در 171 ص، مصور؛ شابک: 9643230848؛ موضوع: داستانهای کودکان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م عنوان: غول بزرگ مهربان؛ رولد دال؛ تصویرگر: کوانتین بلیک؛ مترجم: گیتا گرکانی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نشر مرکز، 1379؛ در 215 ص، مصور؛ شابک: 9645571499؛ موضوع: داستانهای کودکان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م عنوان: غول بزرگ مهربان؛ رولد دال؛ تصویرگر: کوانتین بلیک؛ مترجم: شهلا طهماسبی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نشر مرکز The BFG, Roald Dahl عنوان: غول بزرگ مهربان؛ رولد دال؛ مترجم: مهناز داوری؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، محراب قلم، 1378؛ در 171 ص، مصور؛ شابک: 9643230848؛ موضوع: داستانهای کودکان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م عنوان: غول بزرگ مهربان؛ رولد دال؛ تصویرگر: کوانتین بلیک؛ مترجم: گیتا گرکانی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نشر مرکز، 1379؛ در 215 ص، مصور؛ شابک: 9645571499؛ موضوع: داستانهای کودکان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م عنوان: غول بزرگ مهربان؛ رولد دال؛ تصویرگر: کوانتین بلیک؛ مترجم: شهلا طهماسبی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نشر مرکز، 1385؛ در ده، 215 ص، مصور؛ شابک: 9645039912؛ موضوع: داستانهای کودکان از نویسندگان انگلیسی قرن 20 م مترجم: محبوبه نجف خانی؛ تهران، افق، 1388؛ در 282 ص؛ مترجم: علی هداوند؛ تهران، سپاس، 1393؛ در 220 ص؛ داستان دختر بچه‌ ای یتیم به نام سوفی ست؛ که با غول بزرگ مهربانی که در شهر به دنبال غذاست آشنا می‌شود. در حالی که دیگر غول‌ها با پیدا کردن محل زندگی انسان‌ها، قصد دارند به انگلستان یورش ببرند و همه ی کودکان آنجا را بخورند. برای همین سوفی و غول بزرگش کوشش دارند از انجام آن کار شیطانی جلوگیری کنند. فیلمی در سبک خیال‌پردازی و ماجراجویی به کارگردانی و تهیه‌ کنندگی استیون اسپیلبرگ و نویسندگی ملیسا متیسن است بر اساس همین رمان غول بزرگ مهربان اثر رولد دال ساخته شده که مارک رایلنس در نقش غول بزرگ مهربان؛ روبی بارنهیل در نقش سوفی؛ بیل هیدر در نقش غول؛ پنه‌ لوپه ویلتون در نقش ملکه؛ ربکا هال در نقش ماری و ... نقش آفرینی کرده اند ا. شربیانی

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Entertaining little story. I know I am not the intended audience at this point in my life, but it takes me back to when I was a kid and read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, and Danny Champion of the World. I used to really enjoy Dahl's books and it has been a long time since I have read one. This one was less story and more silly wordplay and fantasy. Towards the end it gets into a storyline, but at least the first half is mainly just a conversation betwee Entertaining little story. I know I am not the intended audience at this point in my life, but it takes me back to when I was a kid and read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, and Danny Champion of the World. I used to really enjoy Dahl's books and it has been a long time since I have read one. This one was less story and more silly wordplay and fantasy. Towards the end it gets into a storyline, but at least the first half is mainly just a conversation between the BFG and Sophie. It is fun, but gets a bit repetitive. Also, I noticed that there was quite a lot of violence and racial stereotyping that would probably be controversial in a children's book by today's standards. This is just an observation, not me being the book police! All that aside - it was silly, it was fun, it was a romp through the imagination. I definitely enjoyed this little fantastical getaway, even if it isn't my favorite Dahl book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    I'm not going to lie, I'm rather disappointed with BFG (which I've never read before)-- but is the favorite Dahl book of many of my friends. I found it to be pretty grating and not that pleasant a read for the following reasons: 1) Jar Jar Binks factor. The BFG speaks in his weird, uneducated pigdin that I frankly find kind of insulting. I'm sure children around the English speaking world are all thrilled by what Dahl has created-- but honestly, even for a word-monger like me, this is pretty ridi I'm not going to lie, I'm rather disappointed with BFG (which I've never read before)-- but is the favorite Dahl book of many of my friends. I found it to be pretty grating and not that pleasant a read for the following reasons: 1) Jar Jar Binks factor. The BFG speaks in his weird, uneducated pigdin that I frankly find kind of insulting. I'm sure children around the English speaking world are all thrilled by what Dahl has created-- but honestly, even for a word-monger like me, this is pretty ridiculous. Also, the fact that he is uneducated and constantly judged for his speech pathology by everyone else is just douchey. 2) Sophie is the most annoying Dahl protagonist ever. She's a snotty, bratty, and imperious little brat who exemplifies the worst of stereotypical English children-- lacking imagination and bossy. Compared to wonderful Matilda, Charlie, James, or even the kid in the witches, Sophie is a jerk. 3) Racial insensitivity (though this is also kind of a redeeming factor). Dahl's bit about human beans and how they taste is hilarious, but also kind of meh. Also, the annoying treatment of the entire Middle East by the Queen of England? She should know better. Redeeming factors: 1) Farting. I'm glad that Dahl supports farting as music. Take that mother England. 2) Hidden Humanitarian Message: BFG is quick to explain that humans are the only species that kill each other. While this is not factually true (watch the Planet Earth chimp wars), Dahl makes a nifty point. Hey kids-- even if the giants are horrible, at least they have the decency not to kill each other. Take that mankind! World Peace! 3) Anti-establishment tinge. Dahl doesn't like army or air force generals, and it shows. 4) Obvious admiration for butlers. "A man does not rise to become the Queen's butler unless he is gifted with extraordinary ingenuity, adaptability, versatility, dexterity, cunning, sophistication, sagacity, discretion and a host of other talents that neither you nor I possess." Dahl definitely has a weird butler fetish. 5) Charles Dickens = Dahl's Chickens. Freaking genius.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    My daughter adored this book and I still have the book today. One of our favourites.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    One of my goals for 2017 is to read every book by Roald Dahl that I can get my hands on. I really enjoyed re-reading this book, since I haven't read it since middle school. In the middle of the night many people are eaten by the Bloodbottler, the Fleshlumpeater, the Bonecruncher, or any of the other giants-rather than the BFG. However, Sophie is lucky! She is captured by the BFG. He is no ordinary bone-crunching giant. He is nice and caring. When Sophie finds out that other giants eat people, she One of my goals for 2017 is to read every book by Roald Dahl that I can get my hands on. I really enjoyed re-reading this book, since I haven't read it since middle school. In the middle of the night many people are eaten by the Bloodbottler, the Fleshlumpeater, the Bonecruncher, or any of the other giants-rather than the BFG. However, Sophie is lucky! She is captured by the BFG. He is no ordinary bone-crunching giant. He is nice and caring. When Sophie finds out that other giants eat people, she makes it her goal to stop them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    "What a spiffling whoppsy room we is in! It is so gigantuous I is needing bicurculers!" Please kill me now. No, I mean it. Seriously. Kill me now. "I am brimfull of buzzburgers, This is a sizzling-hot muckfrumping country..." Please, God. Oh please, please God, make it stop, make it stop, just make it... "What a phizz-whizzing flushbunking seat. I is going to be as bug as a snug in a rug up here..." NOOOO!! Sweet mother of God!!!! Am I still alive? Is it over? Please tell me it's over. I scan throug "What a spiffling whoppsy room we is in! It is so gigantuous I is needing bicurculers!" Please kill me now. No, I mean it. Seriously. Kill me now. "I am brimfull of buzzburgers, This is a sizzling-hot muckfrumping country..." Please, God. Oh please, please God, make it stop, make it stop, just make it... "What a phizz-whizzing flushbunking seat. I is going to be as bug as a snug in a rug up here..." NOOOO!! Sweet mother of God!!!! Am I still alive? Is it over? Please tell me it's over. I scan through these 5-star reviews, and I feel like I'm on crazy pills. This book is awful! It's unendurable. This is a classic? How? How? Nothing happens in it. There is no story. There is no wit. There is no magic. Giant Country might as well be Walmart, for all the magic it evokes. Flat! Dull! Dull! And then there's the cave. The cave! I've read some of these 4-star reviews - they grudgingly admit that their kid's attention began to wander somewhere in the middle....yeah, yeah, yeah, admit it! They hated it! It's the Emperor's New Clothes! I know caves. Caves can be magical. Plato's cave. Tom Sawyer's cave. Robinson Crusoe's cave. Those are magical caves. This cave? Not magical. This is not a magical cave. This is the boringest cave ever. What transpires in this cave? Nothing. I kid you not - nothing. Nothing transpires in this cave. 100 pages transpire in this cave. Two thirds of this book, literally a full two thirds, consists of a single unending dialogue in this cave between Sophie and the Giant. Sophie asks a question, and the Giant answers in his INSUFFERABLE DIALECT!!!!, providing some cutesy, backwards explanation about how things work in Giant Country. Then she asks another question. And he answers. Back and forth. And the answers are invariably moronic, punny, unfunny, uninteresting, and utterly irrelevant. They are winks at the adult reader. His entire personality, his every utterance, is a wink at the adult reader. He is not an attempt at character creation. No Big Friendly Giant would ever say these things. He is a fraud. This whole book is a fraud. I kept waiting for the dialogue to end, so something would happen. No luck. It just kept going and going and going, chapter after chapter after chapter.... I love children's fantasy novels. I love them. I teach them, for God's sakes! But this book is a load of swashbickling scrumdiddliumptious crap. I am genuinely mystified by the love this book engenders in people. Am I raping people's childhood by suggesting this? This book raped my adulthood. Kids know. They know. I began by reading this to my 7 year-old daughter. This was supposed to be our nightly bonding ritual. We started. A few evenings went by. She seemed restless. She seemed distracted. She kept picking her toes. After 4 chapters, I noticed a definite shift. She started avoiding me come sundown. She would look at the clock and get nervous. She kept finding excuses to get out of story-time. She was tired. She was drawing. She had a headache. I pleaded. I coaxed. I offered bribes. Nothing. No good. "Let's watch the trailer again, Daddy!" The trailer. She prefers the trailer! She likes the big hand that comes in the window. She likes John Williams. She likes Mark Rylance, I think. And so here I sit, book on lap, daughter somewhere else in the house - playing, living, being free - and I stare heavily downwards, sunken heart, faced with the unthinkable prospect of having to finish the goddamn thing myself. And I did, somehow. Sweet Jesus. It was painful. Insincere. Affected. Artificial. Tedious. Just so you know, my daughter and I sped through Baum's The Wizard of Oz in about a week. Two, sometimes three chapters a night. She loved it. Couldn't get enough of it. You know why? Because kids know. They know, I tell you. How do parents not know? Why do parents keep inflicting this book on their poor, helpless children? Because of the message? Bullying is bad? Being different is okay? Do the right thing? Here's a good message: don't read shit to your children. Please, stop it, now. Read them Dr. Seuss. Read them Wizard of Oz. Read them Peter Pan. Read them The Wind in the Willows. Read them The Enchanted Castle. Just not this. For the sake of the children. Because they know.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn (devours and digests words)

    I grinned from ear to ear, I laughed out loud, and I even nodded in grave seriousness. These are the reactions The BFG had evoked from me. ‘Human beans is the only animals that is killing their own kind. Even poisnowse snakes is never killing each other. Nor is the most fearsome creatures like tigers and rhinostossterisses. None of them is ever killing their own kind. Has you ever thought about that?’ - The BFG (If you're amused or puzzled at the poor usage of grammar and spellings, I don't quit I grinned from ear to ear, I laughed out loud, and I even nodded in grave seriousness. These are the reactions The BFG had evoked from me. ‘Human beans is the only animals that is killing their own kind. Even poisnowse snakes is never killing each other. Nor is the most fearsome creatures like tigers and rhinostossterisses. None of them is ever killing their own kind. Has you ever thought about that?’ - The BFG (If you're amused or puzzled at the poor usage of grammar and spellings, I don't quite blame you.) This was so delightful! Roald Dahl’s crammed in a lot of odd, new words in here - as usual - and they often cracked me up. What's more, The BFG is also ironic at times and it put me to ponder about the ways of humans. The Big Friendly Giant is the only one of his kind to disapprove of eating human beings. He was out one night, blowing dreams into sleeping children’s windows when he was spotted by Sophie. In his hand went and then, he kidnapped her right out of the orphanage bedroom! The two shared a couple of long conversations about all sorts of topics (some conversations is quite silly, some make you wonder). Before long, they realized they had to do something about the man-eating giants. This was full of adventures. I think any kids could easily have loved this. I've also come to appreciate Dahl’s wry humour and his new never-been-seen-on-dictionaries vocabularies have marked his writing style as unique. It was the movie trailer that pushed me to read the written work and I have no regrets. I can't wait to see how it all played out onscreen!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessika

    Excuse me while I get up on my soapbox. I love Roald Dahl. I always have, and I always will. Although some may disagree with me, I think the most important thing that a child can be encouraged to do is to dream big. There isn't a children's book that Dahl has written that doesn't kickstart the imagination. Now, I admit, I'm only 19, so I don't pretend to know a lot about child-raising, but I stand by what I said--it's important for kids to imagine and believe in the impossible. I mean, c'mon--as Excuse me while I get up on my soapbox. I love Roald Dahl. I always have, and I always will. Although some may disagree with me, I think the most important thing that a child can be encouraged to do is to dream big. There isn't a children's book that Dahl has written that doesn't kickstart the imagination. Now, I admit, I'm only 19, so I don't pretend to know a lot about child-raising, but I stand by what I said--it's important for kids to imagine and believe in the impossible. I mean, c'mon--as a kid, I grew up believing that I could live in a giant peach with a bunch of bugs as my friends...that I could one day own my own magical candy factory...that I could get back at any "mean" grown-ups by using my mind to mess with their day. Now, I'm still a big kid at heart, but if there's one thing I dearly miss from childhood, it's the ability to believe in just about anything. That being said, I think it's just as important for adults to spark their own imagination from time to time. I'm not much of a grown-up myself, but the needs of my imagination are why you'll find me checking books out from my library's childrens' section. Anyway, I suppose I should get down off my soapbox and actually review this book already! I loved it, naturally. This is one of Roald Dahl's books that I hadn't read as a child. (::gasp:: I know!) I loved how this normal little girl becomes friends with a giant, and even the Queen of England! I laughed out loud when the BFG confused Charles Dickens with Dahl's Chickens. My favorite part of the book, though, was the BFG's jumbled form of language and all of the words and phrases he made up. A book for all ages, I'd recommend it for any child, and for any grown-up with a bit of child left in them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Every year I plan to write a blog post to celebrate Roald Dahl Day and every year time runs away with me and I somehow end up missing it. But this year we're celebrating 100 years since his birth so I guess that makes it a perfect time to talk about how much Roald Dahl's books meant to me as a child. I used to reread all of his books over and over again but The BFG was always my favourite, I just loved everything about it from the friendship that forms between Sophie and the BFG, to the adventu Every year I plan to write a blog post to celebrate Roald Dahl Day and every year time runs away with me and I somehow end up missing it. But this year we're celebrating 100 years since his birth so I guess that makes it a perfect time to talk about how much Roald Dahl's books meant to me as a child. I used to reread all of his books over and over again but The BFG was always my favourite, I just loved everything about it from the friendship that forms between Sophie and the BFG, to the adventures they have together along with all of the crazy new words you discover along the way. Don't you just think that we should use words like scrumdiddlyumptious, gobblefunking and whiffswiddle in every day conversation? Not to mention the fact that I'm still waiting for someone to invent a real life version of frobscottle so I can practise my whizzpopping LOL. The BFG is just the ultimate adventure story, I loved the idea of dreams being real things that you could capture and I desperately wanted to visit the land of dreams so I could find my own. I wanted a giant friend who could run so fast with me hiding in their pocket that it felt like I was flying and I even wanted to have breakfast with the Queen. Roald Dahl's stories always have a darker side to them and the giants terrified me but you get to see justice served in the end which was incredibly satisfying. I still have my original copy of this book from 1985 and it's one of my most treasured and reread books. The illustrations by Quentin Blake compliment the story perfectly and make it something to be treasured. My brother was never much of a reader (I'm pretty convinced he must be a changeling because surely we can't be related! LOL) but he absolutely adored the animated version of The BFG and would make us watch it over and over again. I think I've probably seen this adaptation of the story even more times than I've read the book and I have to say it's pretty perfect. It completely captures the feel of the story with it's laugh out loud humour but also the more heartwarming moments between Sophie and the BFG as well as the fearsome man eating giants to add tension. I love the music too and can remember singing along with my brother when he we were kids. This animation may have been created in 1989 but it's still utterly brilliant and when we watched it with my 12 year old nephew a few months ago he loved it just as much as we did. Being such a huge fan of the story I had incredibly high hopes for the new Disney version directed by Steven Spielberg. We made a family outing of it a few weeks ago and I think my Dad, brother and I were probably even more excited than my nephew was. There is no denying that the visual effects in the new movie are stunning, the land of dreams in particular was spectacular and the giants looked impressive. The opening scene where Sophie first sees the BFG and the way he manages to sneak down the streets and avoid being spotted by anyone else was very cleverly done. The young actress who played Sophie did a brilliant job and there was one moment in particular that made me laugh so hard I had tears rolling down my face. I wasn't the only one either and pretty much the entire audience was laughing hysterically. Unfortunately even though there were things I loved about the movie it didn't manage to live up to expectations and we all agreed that the animated version that is nearly 30 years old was better. The new movie stays pretty faithful to the book but it managed to be boring in spite of that, there were actually times when I was just wishing it was over so we could leave the cinema and no matter how good the graphics were or how humourous those few stand out moments were it just didn't make up for the poor pacing. The new movie may have been a slight disappointment but that hasn't decreased my love of The BFG. I have so many happy childhood memories wrapped up in reading Roald Dahl stories and it's easy to see why they're still so popular today. _____________ Found my original copy from 1985! I can't even tell you how many times I've read this book, it's got to be well into double figures though :-)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather - hturningpages

    Just as delightful as I remember! :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Late night, you can’t sleep. Moonlight hits your eyes so you get up to close the curtains. What do you see? Probably nothing, you just close the curtains and return to bed. That’s not the case for Sophie. She saw something, she saw him image: When the giant grubs her with his big arms she’s certainly that he will eat her. She was wrong, not that giants don’t eat kids it’s just that this giant doesn’t eat kids or humans in general. Because this giant, this giant is the BFG (Big friendly giant). He Late night, you can’t sleep. Moonlight hits your eyes so you get up to close the curtains. What do you see? Probably nothing, you just close the curtains and return to bed. That’s not the case for Sophie. She saw something, she saw him image: When the giant grubs her with his big arms she’s certainly that he will eat her. She was wrong, not that giants don’t eat kids it’s just that this giant doesn’t eat kids or humans in general. Because this giant, this giant is the BFG (Big friendly giant). He takes her to his home and although he is a very nice guy he can’t let her go because he is afraid that she will tell everybody that giants exist and people will hunt them. However he protects her from the other 9 man eating giants. When Sophie tells the Bfg that they must stop the other giants from eating people he sais that this can’t be done. Weird right? I mean he is a good guy why wont he help? The answer is simple, not only there are 9 of them, their all are twice the size of him. What Sophie and the Bfg will do? They…. Come on, im not going to tell you, read it

  26. 4 out of 5

    F

    My favourite childhood story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    GaiasWonderland

    Another book scratched out of my top reading list.. I already read quite a few of the author`s books and this was my last one of his. And was it just as funny as his other books? Yes, it was funny just as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Charlie and the Glass Elevator to me. I actually listened to the audio read by David Walliams. He did an excellent job, especially with the invented words that the BFG uses and the different characters of the story. It was wonderful done. He actually made Another book scratched out of my top reading list.. I already read quite a few of the author`s books and this was my last one of his. And was it just as funny as his other books? Yes, it was funny just as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Charlie and the Glass Elevator to me. I actually listened to the audio read by David Walliams. He did an excellent job, especially with the invented words that the BFG uses and the different characters of the story. It was wonderful done. He actually made the story even more hilarious by his narration. Overall, it's Roald Dahl's story, I mean he's an icon, right? He always has the most funniest, weirdest and wonderful magical stories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mai Laakso

    Syyskuun 13. päivä tulee kuluneeksi sata vuotta brittiläisen kirjailijan Roald Dahlin syntymästä. 19 lastenkirjaa, 9 novellikokoelmaa ja lukuisia käsikirjoituksia ja sovituksia elokuviin ja tv-sarjoihin. Kuulostaa lahjakkuudelta, sitä hän oli. Moni muistaa Jali ja suklaatehtaan ja siitä tehdyn elokuvan. Dahlin kirjoittamia on jopa muutama Bond-elokuva. Tästä ihanasta Iso Kiltti Jätti teoksesta on myös tehty elokuva. Roald Dahlin lastenkirja Iso Kiltti Jätti on suurenmoinen ystävyystarina kahden y Syyskuun 13. päivä tulee kuluneeksi sata vuotta brittiläisen kirjailijan Roald Dahlin syntymästä. 19 lastenkirjaa, 9 novellikokoelmaa ja lukuisia käsikirjoituksia ja sovituksia elokuviin ja tv-sarjoihin. Kuulostaa lahjakkuudelta, sitä hän oli. Moni muistaa Jali ja suklaatehtaan ja siitä tehdyn elokuvan. Dahlin kirjoittamia on jopa muutama Bond-elokuva. Tästä ihanasta Iso Kiltti Jätti teoksesta on myös tehty elokuva. Roald Dahlin lastenkirja Iso Kiltti Jätti on suurenmoinen ystävyystarina kahden yksinäisen kohtaamisesta ja ystävyyden syntymisestä. Toinen on iso fantasiaolento ja toinen pieni tyttö. Toinen on vanha ja toinen vasta 8-vuotias. Ystävyys ei katso peiliin, se ei katso ikää eikä ulkonäköä. Ystävyys katsoo sydämeen. Pieni Sohvi sai päättäväisyydellään Ison Kiltin Jätin toimimaan oikein ja lopettamaan muiden jättiläisten ikävät rikokset. Joskus tarvitaan sekä pieniä että isoja, että maailmasta tulisi parempi paikka. Roald Dahl on kirjoittanut unohtumattoman lastenkirjan.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    "Human beans is thinking they is very clever, but they is not. They is nearly all of them notmuchers and squeakpips," says the BFG in Roald Dahl's most philosophical work, and, well, that's about accurate I guess, and I'm not sure how I feel about exposing an eight-year-old to this kind of truth. Fine? Might as well start 'em sometime? "Human beans is the only animals that is killing their own kind," he also says, which is not actually true but the point is more or less valid. And "Just because "Human beans is thinking they is very clever, but they is not. They is nearly all of them notmuchers and squeakpips," says the BFG in Roald Dahl's most philosophical work, and, well, that's about accurate I guess, and I'm not sure how I feel about exposing an eight-year-old to this kind of truth. Fine? Might as well start 'em sometime? "Human beans is the only animals that is killing their own kind," he also says, which is not actually true but the point is more or less valid. And "Just because we happen not to have actually seen something with our own two little winkles, we think it is not existing," which sounds like God stuff but I don't think it necessarily is; it's more about imagination than specific theology. This is a heavy book, is my point. There's a lot packed in here. But "Meanings is not important" anyway, says the Giant. "I cannot be right all the time."

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alex ☣ Deranged KittyCat ☣

    First of all, I read this book in my native language and I think much of the BFG's way of speaking was lost in the translation process. While reading, I was constantly wondering what the original words might have been. Second, my son had to read The BFG for school. I think the story failed to fully capture his attention. So, he found himself in the situation in which tomorrow is the Reading Club at school and he didn't read it. As his reading speed is quite low for his 8 years, I read the book to First of all, I read this book in my native language and I think much of the BFG's way of speaking was lost in the translation process. While reading, I was constantly wondering what the original words might have been. Second, my son had to read The BFG for school. I think the story failed to fully capture his attention. So, he found himself in the situation in which tomorrow is the Reading Club at school and he didn't read it. As his reading speed is quite low for his 8 years, I read the book to him. The BFG was a nice read, but I'm not a huge fan either. This type of story is not what I usually go for. Even as a child, my feelings would have been the same. I like princesses, and princes, and dragons, and... well, pretty much everything that was not in this book. I hope my son's next Reading Club book is girlier (so I can enjoy it if I have to read it). :)

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