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Purgatory Ridge PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Purgatory Ridge
Author: William Kent Krueger
Publisher: Published April 1st 2002 by New York, NY, U.S.A.: Pocket Books, 2002 (first published 2001)
ISBN: 9780671047542
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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30 review for Purgatory Ridge

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    The third book in this excellent series and every bit as good as the first two. Again we are treated to lots of lovely information about the local Native Indians and their customs and beliefs. There is also lots and lots of beautiful description of the local area. Cork O'Connor is one of those book characters who quickly becomes special to the reader. He is honest, likable and trust worthy. He tends to always do the right thing and he is certainly smarter than the average bad guy. In this book th The third book in this excellent series and every bit as good as the first two. Again we are treated to lots of lovely information about the local Native Indians and their customs and beliefs. There is also lots and lots of beautiful description of the local area. Cork O'Connor is one of those book characters who quickly becomes special to the reader. He is honest, likable and trust worthy. He tends to always do the right thing and he is certainly smarter than the average bad guy. In this book though he has everything to fight for and no clues to help him at all. Of course he eventually wins (he has to since there are a whole heap more books in the series)but it is really by default. The twist at the end surprised me as much as him although I think I clicked a bit before he did! Although each of these books does stand alone from the point of view of story, they really need to be read in order to appreciate the characters. Jo for example is a work in progress and I cannot make up my mind whether I like her or not. Each book leaves me with a different opinion. I look forward to seeing more of her and Cork in the next book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonetta

    There's tension brewing between the owner of the town's lumber mill and the local Anishinabee tribe. He wants to clear some great white pines in Our Grandfathers, sacred land for the tribe. When outside ecological activists get involved and an explosion at the mill kills a tribal member, those tensions reach new heights. Concurrently, a shipwreck survivor and his friend are planning to wreak more havoc in the midst of this mayhem. This was an intriguing story primarily because there were several There's tension brewing between the owner of the town's lumber mill and the local Anishinabee tribe. He wants to clear some great white pines in Our Grandfathers, sacred land for the tribe. When outside ecological activists get involved and an explosion at the mill kills a tribal member, those tensions reach new heights. Concurrently, a shipwreck survivor and his friend are planning to wreak more havoc in the midst of this mayhem. This was an intriguing story primarily because there were several stories in play that appeared initially to be disconnected but were cleverly intersected at some point. I must admit that I was fairly clueless about most of it but nailed at least one of them. Again, Krueger most effectively makes the environment a critical part of the story in a whole new way. It meanders a bit but has an excruciatingly suspenseful ending that begins around the 75% mark. I couldn't stop listening and the narrator made it even more exciting. Still loving this series. 4.5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marita

    “Corcoran Liam O’Connor was forty-seven years old. Part Irish, part Ojibwe Anishinaabe, he stood five feet eleven inches tall, weighed one hundred seventy-five pounds, and had brown eyes, thinning red-brown hair, and slightly crooked teeth.” In book 3 of the Cork O'Connor series Cork is no longer sheriff, but he cannot help himself: he is a lawman at heart. This means that when a crime is committed he cannot step aside and let things be. So when a bomb explodes at a local mill, Cork wants to know “Corcoran Liam O’Connor was forty-seven years old. Part Irish, part Ojibwe Anishinaabe, he stood five feet eleven inches tall, weighed one hundred seventy-five pounds, and had brown eyes, thinning red-brown hair, and slightly crooked teeth.” In book 3 of the Cork O'Connor series Cork is no longer sheriff, but he cannot help himself: he is a lawman at heart. This means that when a crime is committed he cannot step aside and let things be. So when a bomb explodes at a local mill, Cork wants to know what is cooking. He soon becomes embroiled in a plot that is much more than the explosion at the mill. Who is Eco-Warrior? Whilst the cops and Cork are brooding over what happened at the mill and the identity of Eco-Warrior, John LePere (half Indian like Cork) ponders over his past. The sore of his troublesome past that festers most is the sinking of the Alfred M. Teasdale of which he was the sole survivor. In that disaster his beloved only brother, whom he had cared for since assisting his mother with the birth, died. Egging him on in tearing the scabs off the wounds of his heartache is the ruthless and mercenary Wesley Bridger who is hoping to score lots and lots of lucre. This leads to a further crime. A crime which touches Cork’s own family. And so, a day which Cork thought might be the happiest of his life as it seemed that a reconcilition might be possible in his fragile marriage, turns into one of the worst days of his life. Nothing will stand in Cork’s way now to find the perpetrators of the various crimes. It is not only a tale of crime, but also one of redemption. Not only do Cork and Jo want to redeem past actions, but LePere suffers, and he too needs redemption. The devil is in the detail, and one or two details didn’t quite gel, but suspend disbelief and go for one hell of a ride.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

    This was another great addition to the series. It was my bedtime when I hit those last 75-100 pages...which only meant that I had to stay up late to finish it. As with the previous books the author starts out slowly, like a Sunday afternoon pleasure ride, only to increase the speed so subtly you almost don't notice it...until you find yourself racing towards the end, holding on for dear life. I'm growing quite attached to Cork O'Connor, his family, and Aurora, Minnesota so I'm looking forward to This was another great addition to the series. It was my bedtime when I hit those last 75-100 pages...which only meant that I had to stay up late to finish it. As with the previous books the author starts out slowly, like a Sunday afternoon pleasure ride, only to increase the speed so subtly you almost don't notice it...until you find yourself racing towards the end, holding on for dear life. I'm growing quite attached to Cork O'Connor, his family, and Aurora, Minnesota so I'm looking forward to more of this series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    5 of 5 stars This is another outstanding read by the author who is fast becoming my all-time favorite. William Kent Krueger’s Cork O’Connor series is nothing short of superb. True, part of the appeal to this Minnesotan reader may be the fact that the setting is northern Minnesota, but this is definitely not the only reason. Mr. Krueger is a master of atmospheric prose. I always feel pulled into the scene, appreciating it with all my senses. His characters are extremely well-developed, and the liv 5 of 5 stars This is another outstanding read by the author who is fast becoming my all-time favorite. William Kent Krueger’s Cork O’Connor series is nothing short of superb. True, part of the appeal to this Minnesotan reader may be the fact that the setting is northern Minnesota, but this is definitely not the only reason. Mr. Krueger is a master of atmospheric prose. I always feel pulled into the scene, appreciating it with all my senses. His characters are extremely well-developed, and the lives of the recurring players progress as the series moves along. The main protagonist, Cork O’Connor is a former sheriff of small town Aurora, Minnesota; the reader learns more about what makes him tick with each book. He is certainly not flawless, but is immensely likeable. I often have trouble with books where the main character is not terribly appealing. O’Connor is part native American and lives near a reservation. Because of this, I have learned a great deal about the Ojibwe (Chippewa) Anishinaabeg people and their culture, a bonus sidelight that infuses all the O’Connor books. Another strong point of Mr. Krueger’s writing is that his stories are consistently filled with twists, turns and surprises galore. I have yet to figure out the bad guy in the books I have read thus far. Purgatory Ridge is even better than Boundary Waters, which I recently gave 5 stars. The story is 2-pronged and I was immersed in how the 2 angles were going to merge. The setup moved along nicely. The last 150 pages literally demanded no interruptions. My usual Saturday afternoon routine was sacrificed without a thought as I raced to the end (I missed watching two World Series games because of this book, and that’s saying a lot). As Cork faced what looked like unsurmontable odds with very few pages remaining, I actually started to cry. These tears came even though I knew Cork would somehow survive; afterall, there are 11 more books to this series!! This just illustrates how this book totally commanded my attention and involved me emotionally. This book gets 5 big stars. I recommend it to every mystery/thriller fan looking for a terrific read. Though it can be read as a stand-alone novel, I do advise starting with Iron Lake, book 1 of the set, just so one can fully enjoy the outstanding character-development feature of this book series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    William

    I've not done this before, but after I had rejected it, a friend here in GR convinced me to continue this book in "skimming mode" - (view spoiler)[ The wonderful, heartfelt reconciliation of Cork and Jo was the bait, and well worth the long-winded other pages (hide spoiler)] So, I continue to continue. Honestly, this book reads as if a completely different person wrote it, compared to the first two books. Half of each of those was brilliant. 38% .... the abuse of both families by Krueger is unforg I've not done this before, but after I had rejected it, a friend here in GR convinced me to continue this book in "skimming mode" - (view spoiler)[ The wonderful, heartfelt reconciliation of Cork and Jo was the bait, and well worth the long-winded other pages (hide spoiler)] So, I continue to continue. Honestly, this book reads as if a completely different person wrote it, compared to the first two books. Half of each of those was brilliant. 38% .... the abuse of both families by Krueger is unforgivable. The dredging of the past against Jo, and the threatening of children for entertainment is obscene. 48% ... Long-winded and so dull. Krueger uses 5 sentences where one would do... 51% ... ugh. More abuse of children. 65% ... dull, dull, repetitive talk. A laundry list instead of prose. There's no wonder, no awe of the forest, no deep thoughts of life. It's like a totally different author wrote this book. And, given a second chance, the rest of the book is like the beginning: Long winded and dull, a hard slog with unsympathetic characters, with a truly nasty plot that bogs down, ugh. Cork almost absent from the first 1/3 of the book... Dry-suit scuba diving with dull non-conversations... A newspaper reporter from hell... Cardboard tree-huggers and lumberjacks spouting dated testosterone clichés at each other... No redeeming Ojibwe wisdom to speak of... Dry prose without meaning or insight... Crime without mystery or inspiration. What a train wreck! By far the worst of Krueger that I’ve read. Authors making money portraying the kidnap and abuse of children for "entertainment" is sick and perverse. F'ck you Krueger. I feel dirty and manipulated. Save yourself: Toss this piece of crap now.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Really enjoyable series. Cork and his family always seem central but moreso in this one. I love the setting and how the Native American culture rubs along and doesn’t with the whites of the community. The case itself was an interesting one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicole~

    Literature, if it didn't enlighten, at least entertained. But history? History was simply a study in futility. Because people never learned. Sole Survivor - Nov, 1986 - The Teasdale, an old ore freighter on its last mission, sank in the Great Lakes during one of the worst gales in history. John LePere was the only survivor. Among the perished was John's beloved younger brother, Billy. John would never recover from Billy's death, at whose hands he would blame The Fitzgerald Shipping Company. Over Literature, if it didn't enlighten, at least entertained. But history? History was simply a study in futility. Because people never learned. Sole Survivor - Nov, 1986 - The Teasdale, an old ore freighter on its last mission, sank in the Great Lakes during one of the worst gales in history. John LePere was the only survivor. Among the perished was John's beloved younger brother, Billy. John would never recover from Billy's death, at whose hands he would blame The Fitzgerald Shipping Company. Over a decade later, near Aurora, Minnesota - Our Grandfathers, Ninishoomisag - about 200 acres of ancient white pine trees stand majestically 100 feet tall with trunks over 4 feet in diameter - sacred to the Anishinaabeg tribe. Their existence are threatened by the Lindstrom Lumber Mill, owned by Karl Lindstrom who won the rights to log the site. When a bombing at the mill leaves an Ojibwe elder dead, Cork O'Connor becomes involved in what appears to be a murderous conflict between Native American and lucrative industrial America. The confinement of the Ojibwe Anishinaabeg to a very few reservations was accomplished through threat and deceit and with complicity of educated people who considered themselves enlightened. The devastation of the land-the clearing of the magnificent white pine forests , the deep gouging of the mine pits on the Iron Range, the dumping of toxins into the crystal water of Lake Superior- was justified as the fulfillment of God's plan, the " manifest destiny" of America. An Anishinaabe boy viewing a logged site Cork, part Anishinaabe himself and an ex-sheriff of the county, easily plays the middle man, the level headed go- between, the negotiator. But, he's torn between getting involved in the investigation, and his commitment to rebuilding his family life and relationship with his wife. His involvement becomes sealed, though, when Lindstrom's wife Grace Fitzgerald and her son are kidnapped, along with Cork's wife and son. For Cork, the crime just got personal. I was impressed with Krueger's introduction of the Ojibwe way of life and spirituality; their beliefs weren't thrust in the reader's face like a gale force wind, never preachy or dogmatic. Rather Krueger managed balance between the races, acquainting the reader of the Ojibwe's nature with thoughtful illumination. It's obvious he respects the Native people tremendously. Krueger also paid attention to the connection and interaction between his characters and the environment. His description of the setting was breathtaking; it strengthened the image in the reader's mind; it allowed the reader to easily fall in love with the land. During summer in the North Country, the sun seemed to linger forever. The light near dusk was like one final exhalation that breathed gold onto pines and tamaracks, the birch and aspen, and everything seemed to hold very still as the sun let out its long last breath. Cork loved summer evenings in Tamarack County, loved those moments when the earth seemed to pause in its turning. One final exhalation that breathed gold onto pines and tamaracks Krueger's use of one of the many disasters in Great Lakes' history, the sinking of the SS Daniel J. Morrell in 1966 with the miraculous survival of one man, Dennis Hale, gave the plot believability, and John's character validity. You can read about this part of Krueger's inspiration for Purgatory Ridge here - http://williamkentkrueger.com/blog/?p=41 SS Daniel J. Morrell , the inspiration for The Teasdale in Purgatory Ridge. Also check out a little article about Dennis Hale, the Sole Survivor of SS Daniel J. Morrell here - http://www.news-herald.com/general-ne... This novel was the 3rd in the Cork O'Connor Series written by William Kent Krueger, and the first in the series that I've read(although I did read Ordinary Grace-loved it but not much Cork in it). I had a lot of fun with this-I think I would read more of Cork soon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Una Tiers

    This book has stronger character development than the earlier one I read. The plot has strength in collecting different story lines and weaving them together with the family issues too.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Harry

    William Kent Krueger's Cork O'OConnor series comprise a series of stories set in Aurora Minnesota, an area of the country of which I'm blatantly ignorant. Frankly, in reading the reviews of this setting I managed to barely stifle a yawn. Small town mysteries set in a frozen wasteland? With boring backgrounds that involve Indian supernatural folklore - I don't stomach mysteries that resort to such subterfuge, avoid beyond this world explanations when the genre is detective/mystery, decry irration William Kent Krueger's Cork O'OConnor series comprise a series of stories set in Aurora Minnesota, an area of the country of which I'm blatantly ignorant. Frankly, in reading the reviews of this setting I managed to barely stifle a yawn. Small town mysteries set in a frozen wasteland? With boring backgrounds that involve Indian supernatural folklore - I don't stomach mysteries that resort to such subterfuge, avoid beyond this world explanations when the genre is detective/mystery, decry irrational explanations of the crime which to me defeat the whole purpose of reading the damn book (unless of course you are Michael Gruber and you're reading the Jimmy Paz series - yeah, I'll read anything Gruber puts out there!) - boring red neck characters (is there such a thing as a Minnesota red neck?), small town corruption and politics, incompetent forensics and pathologists, petty motivations,and what not. Needless to say, I wasn't thrilled. And yet: In 2005 and 2006, Krueger won back to back Anthony Awards for best novel - a feat only matched by one other writer since the award's inception. Normally, as this essay so eloquently states, I don't ascribe to popularity, or the NYT Best Sellers list as those manuscripts inevitably disappoint but where it comes to mystery/detective awards, the final vote is usually something I can go for. And, as I was in a hurry and needed something to download to my Kindle, fully prepared to read yet another book full of flat characters, resigned myself to boring ethnographic descriptions, I said: "Screw it, let's give Mr. Krueger a try." I found myself marveling at this author's delicate handling and knowledge of the very thing that made me not want to read it: The spiritual undertones and affectations that guide human beings (which I am interested in) but that can come loose at the seams when bordering on superstition and surreal explorations. That he does this through the juxtaposition of Catholicism and the folklore and beliefs of the Anishinaabeg, or "Original People", and that he does so by fusing that carefully within the storyline so that it never seems gratuitous, over played, or cause the outcome to be dependent on irrationality is masterful. Nice! As Mr. Krueger says: "In the mysteries that I write, I often deal with the whole question of the spiritual journey. It’s always intrigued me. I’ve never believed in the Christian view of heaven. But I certainly believe in eternal life. It’s a belief that goes back to a black and white film I saw in a grungy movie theater when I was too young for all the esoteric considerations of the afterlife. It’s amazing, isn’t it, the things that can change your life." In terms of the Anishinaabeg Mr. Krueger is careful to not enforce the stereotype to which most have come to: [...]If you read my stories, please don’t read them as ethnography. The Anishinaabeg are far more complex culturally, rich historically, and textured spiritually, than I will ever be able to adequately portray in my writing. But if I’m able to give you a sense of the admiration I feel for them, then I’ve succeeded. This book reminds me of my boyhood heroes. In the Netherlands where I was born, it wasn't cops and robbers we played while kids:it was cowboy and indians; my fictional heroes were Winnetou and Old Shatterhand a YA series published in the Netherlands but not available in the states. Krueger manages to convey the Native American culture spanning centuries, on into modern day America, in such a way so as to recall my boyhood dreams. There are terrifying moments, men bound to trees and being tortured, honor among killers, and dishonor and deceit within ordinary people. As to Cork O'Connor the hero in this series. As most who read my reviews know, I thoroughly enjoy the loner as heroic, a man or woman who understands that despite social conventions (often designed to hide facing this) man is essentially alone, a creature running around on this planet with (hopefully) purpose. And, as most also know, I despise flat characters (Vince Flynn comes to mind - sorry, Leon!). Cork is the former, not the latter. As a father I understand the inexplicable guilt one feels towards one's children upon facing divorce. And as a father I have come to admire, as Cork does, the resiliency children have to overcome such a situation and make the best of it (far better managed than us adults!). Everything is about juxtaposition. Cork O'Conner is a man who believes in justice, not as meted out by often corrupt law enforcement, but the justice of not denying reality, the justice of truth. When Cork sets his mind to resolving a mystery that to others seems clear cut, ready to be put to rest, he is like a rabid dog unwilling to lessen the vice like grip of his jaws no matter what the consequences to himself and those he loves. We feel his struggle with morality, his disappointment with an almighty being, and yet feel his empirical longing for a peace that the world has consigned to other worldly systems. Cork is, forever, the man in between. The plot is superb. The writing carefully edited so as to give us a straight mystery detective while infusing us with a pleasurable knowledge of Aurora, it's inhabitants, and the evil that belies even the most tranquil of locations. Yeah, I liked it! And, the usual disclaimer, if you've read this review of one of the O'Connor series, you've read 'em all. Good reading!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: ★★★★ "Not far from the small town of Aurora (population 3,752) lies an ancient two-hundred-acre expanse of great white pines, sacred to the Anishinaabe and known to them as Minishoomisag (Our Grandfathers). Wealthy industrialist Karl Lindstrom does not have a reputation as a sensitive environmentalist, and some members of the Anishinaabe tribe are concerned about the proximity of the trees to his lumber mill. So when an explosion at the mill results in the death of a night watchman, it's o RATING: ★★★★ "Not far from the small town of Aurora (population 3,752) lies an ancient two-hundred-acre expanse of great white pines, sacred to the Anishinaabe and known to them as Minishoomisag (Our Grandfathers). Wealthy industrialist Karl Lindstrom does not have a reputation as a sensitive environmentalist, and some members of the Anishinaabe tribe are concerned about the proximity of the trees to his lumber mill. So when an explosion at the mill results in the death of a night watchman, it's obvious whom suspicion will fall upon. Cork O'Connor, in the throes of straightening out his life and repairing his marriage, is asked by his successor as sheriff to help with the investigation. His sense of community obliges him to accept, but Cork has distinctly mixed feelings about the case. For one thing, he is part Anishinaabe himself. For another, his lawyer wife, Jo, represents the tribe. Meanwhile, in a secluded house that overlooks the lakeside home of the Lindstrom family, a reclusive shipwreck survivor and his sidekick also seem to be harboring some resentment of their own against the industrialist. And it soon becomes clear to Cork that harmony, both at home and in the town, will be on the back burner for some time." (From Publisher) Okay, Mr. Krueger you got me. I have officially added rest of the Cork O'Connor books on my "want-to read" list. I was hooked from the beginning and the story moved quickly so I was galloping through it. I have not mentioned in my other reviews, but one other thing that I love about Krueger's writing style is his description of Aurora and it's wondrous beauty. Often the settings in the novel are almost another character. You can definitely image the place but also almost feel how it would be there. While I am still not a fan of Jo, I do seem to warm to her when she is around her sister and children. I am ready for next month. My Novelesque Life

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dick Reynolds

    John LePere and Wesley Bridger are far out on Lake Superior. They are deep-water diving, searching a sunken wreck for artifacts, but encounter suspicious circumstances of snagged lines, a severed air hose, and another boat taking an unusual interest in their activity. Meanwhile, back in the Minnesota town of Aurora, an explosion at Karl Lindstrom’s nearby lumber mill kills the nightwatchman. What could these separate activities have to do with the larger story? In a word: plenty. Author William John LePere and Wesley Bridger are far out on Lake Superior. They are deep-water diving, searching a sunken wreck for artifacts, but encounter suspicious circumstances of snagged lines, a severed air hose, and another boat taking an unusual interest in their activity. Meanwhile, back in the Minnesota town of Aurora, an explosion at Karl Lindstrom’s nearby lumber mill kills the nightwatchman. What could these separate activities have to do with the larger story? In a word: plenty. Author William Kreuger tells a complex tale as former Aurora sheriff Cork O’Connor and his wife, Jo, become involved with LePere, Bridger and Lindstrom’s situation. About the middle of the book, these two seemingly separate plot lines converge and you’ll get a fuller appreciation of what’s going on. But there are still many plot twists ahead before you come to the surprising and satisfying end of the book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I really enjoyed this book. It started out kind of slow, and then the pace picked up, like revealing the lives of the main characters and then throwing them off Purgatory Ridge. I did learn a couple new words. I had to look up "popple" and "talus". I like that popple is a Midwestern term for what I've always known as poplar. I think maybe the underlying theme in this book is redemption. For me and one of the characters, there's also forgiveness, but I will still remember. Let's see what happens in I really enjoyed this book. It started out kind of slow, and then the pace picked up, like revealing the lives of the main characters and then throwing them off Purgatory Ridge. I did learn a couple new words. I had to look up "popple" and "talus". I like that popple is a Midwestern term for what I've always known as poplar. I think maybe the underlying theme in this book is redemption. For me and one of the characters, there's also forgiveness, but I will still remember. Let's see what happens in the next book, shall we?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    A solid mystery from Krueger, who is becoming one of my favorite writers in the genre. I love the North Woods setting, and a strong cast of reoccurring characters makes for a compelling series. There is a lot going here, though, and perhaps the overall plot suffers just a little bit. There are two plot lines that converge. Karl Lindstrom, a lumber magnate, is targeted by opponents of the logging industry and its destruction of old growth forests. Eco-terrorists are suspected, as well as local Na A solid mystery from Krueger, who is becoming one of my favorite writers in the genre. I love the North Woods setting, and a strong cast of reoccurring characters makes for a compelling series. There is a lot going here, though, and perhaps the overall plot suffers just a little bit. There are two plot lines that converge. Karl Lindstrom, a lumber magnate, is targeted by opponents of the logging industry and its destruction of old growth forests. Eco-terrorists are suspected, as well as local Native Americans who revere the great old trees. There’s a bombing at the lumber mill, which turns into a murder investigation when a local resident is found in the rubble. In a humble cabin across the lake from Lindstrom’s mansion is John LePere, a recluse who continually mourns the loss of his brother. LePere was the lone survivor of a shipwreck, when the ore freighter he and his brother were on went to the bottom of Lake Superior in a vicious storm. The ship was owned by the Fiztgerald Shipping Company, and Grace Fitzgerald is an heir to that fortune, and wouldn’t you know it, married to Lindstrom. (In a neat little reference, Grace’s deceased first husband was named Edmund, as in the Edmund Fitzgerald. Cue Gordon Lightfoot…..). LePere is a janitor at the local casino, and makes the acquaintance of Bridger, an ex-SEAL who convinces LePere that the shipwreck could have been more than just bad weather and fate. They do some deep diving to investigate the wreckage and find some interesting evidence. At this point I expected the story to focus on this, and be like a Clive Cussler mystery. But then there’s a kidnapping, and the story takes a very different turn. Krueger could have written two novels, one on the logging/eco-terriorist plot, and one on the shipwreck angle. Both plots sort of give way to the kidnapping storyline. That’s not necessarily a criticism, since the book is well-paced and a page-turner. Krueger just seems to be brimming with ideas, and manages to pull it off. At the heart of everything is Cork O’Connor, ex-Sheriff of Aurora MN, but always at the center of any trouble in town. Cork is in the process of reassembling his marriage and family life after a rough patch (covered in detail in Book #1, Iron Lake). His wife Jo and his young son Stevie figure prominently in this story. LePere’s storyline is based on actual events, and Krueger does a good job of presenting the debate centered on old-growth timber logging. Overall, this is really good stuff. Any fan of James Lee Burke and his Dave Robicheaux novels will enjoy this series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dana Stabenow

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Kreuger writes in the voice of his hero, ex-sheriff Cork O'Connor History...was a useless discipline, an assemblage of accounts and memories, often flawed, that in the end did the world no service. Math and science could be applied in concrete ways. Literature, if it didn't enlighten, at least entertained. But history? History was simply a study in futility. Because people never learned. Century after century, they committed the same atrocities against one another or against the earth, and the on Kreuger writes in the voice of his hero, ex-sheriff Cork O'Connor History...was a useless discipline, an assemblage of accounts and memories, often flawed, that in the end did the world no service. Math and science could be applied in concrete ways. Literature, if it didn't enlighten, at least entertained. But history? History was simply a study in futility. Because people never learned. Century after century, they committed the same atrocities against one another or against the earth, and the only thing that changed was the magnitude of the slaughter. Amen, brother. In this third in the Cork O'Connor series, Cork and his wife Jo and their son and two daughters are just beginning to put their family back together when somebody calling himself the Eco-Warrior sets off a bomb at a lumber mill fixing to cut down and mill an old-growth stand of white pines sacred to the Anishinaabe tribe in northern Minnesota. Unfortunately, the bomb accidentally kills someone, so now it's murder (see "slaughter," above). Cork is drawn pretty willingly into the investigation, despite his now amateur status, and then the investigation gets personal when Jo and Stevie are accidentally kidnapped along with the local timber baron's wife and son. The descriptions of the Minnesota backwoods are so real you can smell the smoke from the forest fires, and there is a great character in Henry Meloux, the Anishinaabe mide who is also Cork's father figure. I also really like the way Kreuger writes about Cork and Jo's marriage, the sweat equity that goes into a good relationship and the work it takes so you can both come back to it from mistakes made. Lake Superior, Kitchigami, is an omnipresence throughout the novel and it's only fitting that the novel ends as it begins, on it with a monster storm and page-turning, heart-in-your-mouth action. Good summer read. ***SPOILER ALERT!*** I knew whodunnit from the first, and I think the cops, all of them, should have known it, too. Or at least suspected it. The first and best suspect is always the spouse, and the motive here was far too enormous to be overlooked. I hate it when cops are dumb, and then are never called on it. "You morons!" I kept shouting. That's why three stars instead of four. They didn't even bother to look in the medicine cabinet! But the point is, I was shouting. Kreuger had me to the last page.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    This is the third of the series. His writing continues to get better, and less junk and side issues. You could skip the first two and start here even. I "figured it out" not long before the book began to resolve. Everything coalesced--meaning all the information was there, no surprise information in the last chapter as some books do. I prefer this. After "the ending" the ending seemed to drag out a bit, then peak, and then resolve much more emotionally than "the ending" was at. Although you knew wh This is the third of the series. His writing continues to get better, and less junk and side issues. You could skip the first two and start here even. I "figured it out" not long before the book began to resolve. Everything coalesced--meaning all the information was there, no surprise information in the last chapter as some books do. I prefer this. After "the ending" the ending seemed to drag out a bit, then peak, and then resolve much more emotionally than "the ending" was at. Although you knew what had to happen to one character, I still held out some hope that it wouldn't happen. That was resolved at the end-end. It was also nice that since book one, Cork and his wife are growing together, mending a damaged marriage--so many books like to go the other direction.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Very good thriller in this series. I thought it started slow (careful to show both sides of the logging issues in northern Minnesota), but I could hardly put it down by the halfway point.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    I thought the quality would go down with each one, but this one stayed strong. I am so happy there are many more books to go and still being added to.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Glenna Pritchett

    Another great book in the Cork O'Connor series! I am so enjoying my journey with these characters and the lovely Minnesota setting.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Olivermagnus

    Purgatory Ridge is the third book in the Cork O'Connor series. Following events in the last book, Cork is no longer sheriff of Aurora, Minnesota. He's inherited a friend's burger joint and seems fairly content. He's married Jo, an attorney who works for the Ojibwe tribe and is part Anishinaabe himself. Their marriage has been in turmoil but they are working hard to stay together. Meanwhile a logging company has gained the rights to harvest a stand of white pine trees known as the Old Grandfather Purgatory Ridge is the third book in the Cork O'Connor series. Following events in the last book, Cork is no longer sheriff of Aurora, Minnesota. He's inherited a friend's burger joint and seems fairly content. He's married Jo, an attorney who works for the Ojibwe tribe and is part Anishinaabe himself. Their marriage has been in turmoil but they are working hard to stay together. Meanwhile a logging company has gained the rights to harvest a stand of white pine trees known as the Old Grandfathers, sacred to the Anishinaabe people. Karl Lindstrom, owner of the company, has moved to town with his wife and son to oversee the operation. During a protest between the Ojibwe and an environmental group leads to an explosion and the death of a local man. Someone named Eco-Warrior takes credit for the blast and Cork steps in to help the sheriff investigate. In a parallel story we meet John LaPere, who lives on the rocky formation known as Purgatory Ridge, on Lake Superior. He's lived there since he became the only survivor of a 1986 shipwreck that took the life of his brother. He's still searching for what happened to send the ship to the bottom of the freezing lake. All thes stories start to come together when Lindstrom's wife and son are kidnapped. Because Cork's wife, Jo, and their son, Stevie, were visiting at the time, they were also taken. It's not long before we know who and why they were kidnapped. This becomes a very complex plot but I was riveted the entire time. I think this author does a particularly wonderful job of describing the setting and making his characters so realistic. If you're looking for a well thought out mystery, with a surprising ending, I can highly recommend Purgatory Ridge.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda Branich

    OH.....MY.....GOODNESS! Often when a writer gets a few books under his belt, he begins to run out of ideas, a predictable pattern develops in his books, and the continuing storyline fizzles out. NOT SO with William Kent Krueger's Cork O'Connor series. Each successive book adds more layers to the characters of Cork, his family, and others in the community who are repetitive supporting characters. Each book takes the reader on an adventure to a different part of the Northern Minnesot wilderness, or OH.....MY.....GOODNESS! Often when a writer gets a few books under his belt, he begins to run out of ideas, a predictable pattern develops in his books, and the continuing storyline fizzles out. NOT SO with William Kent Krueger's Cork O'Connor series. Each successive book adds more layers to the characters of Cork, his family, and others in the community who are repetitive supporting characters. Each book takes the reader on an adventure to a different part of the Northern Minnesot wilderness, or a different aspect of life in Cork's community and the nearby Ojibwe reservation. The books could be read in the series, or stand alone, as any historical information about past events crucial to understanding an event or situation is carefully and delicately woven into each suspenceful thriller. In this page-turner, Cork is trying to rebuild his life and his marriage. He and his attorney wife, Jo, find themselves on opposite sides of the fence in this story. Cork, ex Chicago cop and Tamarack County sheriff, is torn between the two branches of his heritage--white, Irish Catholic and Native American. Things are not always what they seem in Krueger's works, and it is often difficult to figure out who the good and bad guys are. Many twists and turns later, the reader will furiously turn pages to reach the conclusion. Krueger promises a great read, and he definitely delivers one worthy of 5 stars.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I was going to give this one a 4, but since I was actually crying as I read the final pages, it has to be a 5. William Kent Krueger can really tell a story! This one partially concerned a kidnapping of some favorite characters, but it is the venue in Minnesota, the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe tribal lore, and the details of small town life that make it un-put-downable. That said, the suspense is prolonged until the very end, and the end surprise to the reader is authenic - I don't know how the author did I was going to give this one a 4, but since I was actually crying as I read the final pages, it has to be a 5. William Kent Krueger can really tell a story! This one partially concerned a kidnapping of some favorite characters, but it is the venue in Minnesota, the Anishinaabe/Ojibwe tribal lore, and the details of small town life that make it un-put-downable. That said, the suspense is prolonged until the very end, and the end surprise to the reader is authenic - I don't know how the author did it! Cork O'Connor (this is #3 of the series behind Boundary Waters and Iron Lake) is a protagonist that I think about often, even when I'm not engaged in one of the books in the series. He is so real, and his interactions with his family so compelling, that I am in awe of Krueger's genius for creating memorable characters and stories with page-turning plots. This is a series where every book has a memorable and complete ending. No cliff-hangers here; this author doesn't need that particularly annoying tactic to keep his readers coming back. However, if you are tempted to read this as a stand-alone, I recommend that you read #1 and #2 first. It is so much more satisfying that way.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    In this third book of the series about Cork O'Conner, Krueger takes a true story of a survivor of a freighter's wreak on Lake Superior. In the book, this survivor lost his brother in the wreak, and vows revenge on the owner of the company. I've seen Lake Superior, but only on sunny summer days, and in the book we come to realize that not only is it a huge body of water, but with such cold temperatures that one cannot live long in it without some diving protection. I really like how O'Connor turn In this third book of the series about Cork O'Conner, Krueger takes a true story of a survivor of a freighter's wreak on Lake Superior. In the book, this survivor lost his brother in the wreak, and vows revenge on the owner of the company. I've seen Lake Superior, but only on sunny summer days, and in the book we come to realize that not only is it a huge body of water, but with such cold temperatures that one cannot live long in it without some diving protection. I really like how O'Connor turns to his heritage to seek wisdom from the Tribal elders. Also, in this book, we see more of the relationship between Cork and his family, especially that between Jo and he as they continue mending their marriage. Krueger writes a suspenseful book that leaves me wanting to go on to the next book in the series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    At the recommendation of a relative, I've started reading William Kent Krueger's Cork O'Connor mystery series. These are all somewhere between a 3 and 4 for me. For this type of writing, he admittedly does a good job. He is a Minnesotan whose stories take place in Aurora, not too far from the North Shore and Lake Superior. He truly shapes the locale and people. Its beautiful country and Krueger not only describes it well, but weaves Native American spirituality into his characters and plots. Con At the recommendation of a relative, I've started reading William Kent Krueger's Cork O'Connor mystery series. These are all somewhere between a 3 and 4 for me. For this type of writing, he admittedly does a good job. He is a Minnesotan whose stories take place in Aurora, not too far from the North Shore and Lake Superior. He truly shapes the locale and people. Its beautiful country and Krueger not only describes it well, but weaves Native American spirituality into his characters and plots. Contrary to my stereotype of the mystery genre, the characters have slightly more subtlety than most. I've been advised to read them in order as the relationships progress. These are the perfect diversion when I get in these stressful spells at work, need entertaining reading and not something I have to work at.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Definitely not my cuppa. Not what I would consider a mystery, maybe a thriller. As in book 1, the drawn out resolution happens only because Corcoran does something stupid. Annoying, as is the author's leaving a plot line hanging, obviously to help sell the next book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jim Angstadt

    This is number 3 in the Cork O'Connor series. Like #2, it stretched belief and left one wishing for more Ojibwe and white perspectives. When there are other books to read, Krueger will be low on my stack.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    Revenge, years in the making comes to the Boundary Waters and Cork and his family get caught up in the middle of it. Good book in a great series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Unknown rating.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Unknown rating.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Don

    In a note at the beginning of this entry in the Cork O'Connor mystery series, William Kent Krueger tells us that the idea for the novel came from a true incident, a shipwreck which took place in 1966 that left only one survivor. Krueger read the book that survivor wrote and that served as the impetus for this "edge of your seat" mystery about a deadly explosion. As with the earlier entries, this is a finely crafted mystery with exceptional character development. I will admit that there were some In a note at the beginning of this entry in the Cork O'Connor mystery series, William Kent Krueger tells us that the idea for the novel came from a true incident, a shipwreck which took place in 1966 that left only one survivor. Krueger read the book that survivor wrote and that served as the impetus for this "edge of your seat" mystery about a deadly explosion. As with the earlier entries, this is a finely crafted mystery with exceptional character development. I will admit that there were some elements of the final chapters that seemed a tad unlikely, but not unlikely enough to cause me to think less of the book. In fact, I was up very late last night finishing this one; there was no way on Earth that I would have been able to sleep until I knew how things turned out. I’m taking a break from this series to read other things, but you can rest assured that I will soon pay another visit to Cork O'Connor's universe.

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