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Sjene Carstva PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Sjene Carstva
Author: Steve Perry
Publisher: Published 2004 by Neobična naklada (first published May 1996)
ISBN: 9536708159
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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U novom nastavku ove proslavljene svemirske sage Princ Xizor, jedan od najbližih Imperatorovih ljudi, skovao je pomalo kompleksan, ali izvediv plan kako bi zauzeo vladarski tron i tako postao najmoćniji čovjek u cijeloj galaksiji. Prvi koga se namjerava riješiti je Darth Vader, drugi najznačajniji čovjek odmah iza Imperatora i njegov vjerni podanik, istovremeno i otac omra U novom nastavku ove proslavljene svemirske sage Princ Xizor, jedan od najbližih Imperatorovih ljudi, skovao je pomalo kompleksan, ali izvediv plan kako bi zauzeo vladarski tron i tako postao najmoćniji čovjek u cijeloj galaksiji. Prvi koga se namjerava riješiti je Darth Vader, drugi najznačajniji čovjek odmah iza Imperatora i njegov vjerni podanik, istovremeno i otac omraženog Lukea Skywalkera. Tako bi ostvario dvostruku korist - osvetio mu se za ubojstvo obitelji i uklonio ga kao nepoželjnog na svom usponu do vrhunca moći, imajući na umu savršeno oružje za njegovo uništenje - smrt sina Lukea Skywalkera. Međutim, lukavi Darth Valder sluti da ono što Xizor priželjkuje nije galaksija u kojoj bi bilo mjesta za njega i Imperatora..

30 review for Sjene Carstva

  1. 4 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    "Book, you have the right to a speedy trial" review THE DEFENSE - Author does a great job portraying the battle between the Dark Side and the Light Side of the Force - I just reread that sentence...I'm starting to think it's possible that I might be a... GEEK! :o - Personalities of the classic Star Wars characters are captured very well...particularly Lando! - Me, a geek? I always thought I was as suave and sophisticated as Lando as I strut around in my dress shirt and Scooby-Doo tie! - Fills "Book, you have the right to a speedy trial" review THE DEFENSE - Author does a great job portraying the battle between the Dark Side and the Light Side of the Force - I just reread that sentence...I'm starting to think it's possible that I might be a... GEEK! :o - Personalities of the classic Star Wars characters are captured very well...particularly Lando! - Me, a geek? I always thought I was as suave and sophisticated as Lando as I strut around in my dress shirt and Scooby-Doo tie! - Fills in the gaps between "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi" nicely - So if you're like me and ever wondered where Leia got her bounty hunter costume from "Jedi"...oh my god Lucas, who asks questions like that?!? I AM A GEEK!!! - Action sequences flow nicely...especially the exciting dogfights between the spaceships - If only there been some indication I may be turning into a geek at my high school prom when I spent the whole night sitting in the corner reading comic books...oh, okay, now I get it! - Xizor and Guri make very compelling adversaries for both the Rebel Alliance and the Empire - Know what? If enjoying Star Wars makes me a geek, then I'm perfectly happy being a geek! (Which is good, since fate already made that decision for me a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away!) THE PROSECUTION - Princess Leia spends a little too much time in the "damsel in distress" role - Realizing that instead of kicking butt, Leia was going to spend several chapters sitting in a prison cell? I believe Darth Vader said it best when he said, "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!" - Some of the Darth Vader POV felt a little...off! - Reading things like, "Vader sighed"...Vader NEVER sighs! That sound wasn't a sigh, dammit, it was him choking the life out of the inept Imperial commander who would have made a lesser villain sigh!!! The Dark Lord of the Sith DOES NOT SIGH!(Easy, Dave, compose yourself...) - Dash Rendar just might be the most annoying Star Wars character ever... Alright...second most annoying Star Wars character ever... *SIGH* (See that, I can sigh, but not Vader...NEVER Vader!) Let's just say Dash Rendar is in the Top Ten Most Annoying Star Wars characters list and leave it at that! THE VERDICT An entertaining adventure that captures most of the magic of Star Wars (as well as a few of the missteps), this book is a fun romp for anyone who's already watched the movies and wants more Star Wars! FULL REVIEW TO COME

  2. 5 out of 5

    Siria

    All the furore over the release of Episode III has made me go back and search out some of the Star Wars Extended Universe novels that I devoured so furiously when I was a kid, out of the hope that immersing myself in the Original Trilogy and the books based around it would help block out some of the pain caused by the prequels. They're essentially glorified, sanctioned fanfiction - though the ten-through-twelve-year-old version of me didn't know that. Shadows of the Empire was one of my favourit All the furore over the release of Episode III has made me go back and search out some of the Star Wars Extended Universe novels that I devoured so furiously when I was a kid, out of the hope that immersing myself in the Original Trilogy and the books based around it would help block out some of the pain caused by the prequels. They're essentially glorified, sanctioned fanfiction - though the ten-through-twelve-year-old version of me didn't know that. Shadows of the Empire was one of my favourites at the time, and I was curious to see how it would stand up re-reading it so many years later. To put it bluntly: not bad. Re-reading it with the knowledge of what fanfiction is in my mind, it really does seem more than ever like one. It even fulfils a role which a lot of fanfic takes on - filling in events which take place 'off-screen' in canon, the background events which we don't get to see. The book itself is set between Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, and tells the story of the first failed attempt to rescue Han. The pacing is as fast and the action as non-stop as the movies, helping to pull along the plot, which aspires to the Machiavellian, but which really ends up achieving only the political acumen which one could imagine the bastard love child of Blair and Bush possessing. The characterisation is mostly good, too, with the addition of some new OCs - Guri (the assassin femme fetale droid, whom I quite like); Prince Xizor (the mostly fun-in-a-ahahaomgwtf! way Gary Stu who continues on in the fine tradition of fantasy novel characters having really fucking stupid names); and Dash Rendar (so obviously a clone of Han Solo I'm surprised they didn't test his DNA for Corellian ancestry). The expansion of the canonical universe I especially liked - particularly the parts where we get to see something of how the Empire operated on a day-to-day basis. The dialogue, however, is choppy, and often reads more like a screen-play than a novel. The exposition too often seems forced - something which seems especially irksome when you consider that the number of people reading this who don't have a fairly good knowledge of the Star Wars universe will more than probably be extremely low. All in all, though, it's a fun read if you have an hour or two to spare and want to switch your brain off. If Star Wars is a popcorn kind of movie, this is a popcorn kind of book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Rated by my SO, who likes it because Xizor makes a pretty awesome villain, and Dash Rendar is all kinds of awesome. It answers some questions, fills up some lost time between Empire and Return, and features most of the SW movie cast.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    "Stand back. Let's see if it will stop a lightsaber." Han Solo is locked in carbonite, in the possession of Boba Fett. Luke, Lando, Leia, and Chewie are desperately searching for the bounty hunter, in the hopes of rescuing Han. Meanwhile, Prince Xizor of the Black Sun is angling to destroy his rival and destroyer of his family, Darth Vader. NOTE: Based on the audiobook and what I remember of the novel I read years ago. I Liked: Steve Perry is given a difficult task: bridge the gap between The Empire "Stand back. Let's see if it will stop a lightsaber." Han Solo is locked in carbonite, in the possession of Boba Fett. Luke, Lando, Leia, and Chewie are desperately searching for the bounty hunter, in the hopes of rescuing Han. Meanwhile, Prince Xizor of the Black Sun is angling to destroy his rival and destroyer of his family, Darth Vader. NOTE: Based on the audiobook and what I remember of the novel I read years ago. I Liked: Steve Perry is given a difficult task: bridge the gap between The Empire Strikes Backand Return of the Jedi. This is difficult because he has to write an interesting book, yet keep continuity. Most authors just have to write a plausible future Luke, Leia, and Han; this job is far more difficult. And for the most part, Perry does an impressive job. The characters were fairly strong, namely Luke and Leia. I liked how Perry lead Luke into being the sedate Jedi we see in Return of the Jedi, making him grow from the brash apprentice in Empire Strikes Back. One moment I particularly was fond of was Luke returning to Obi-Wan's hovel to build his lightsaber. I loved this little bit of continuity. Leia was also well done, conflicted about her feelings to Han, wondering how he felt, nervous, yet still strong even in the face of Prince Xizor's advances (which were fine to me as he was using pheromones on her--in fact, I thought it made her look stronger to be able to withstand his biological advances). As for our bad guys, we rarely get to see Darth Vader in the helmet, and at the time, this novel was novel (har har) in that we got a Vader point of view. Since most Bantam books were strictly post-Jedi, Vader got omitted completely, which was a shame, as he was such an interesting character. Here, I enjoyed how Perry had Vader try to use the Dark Side to heal himself, but always fail, as his joy for being healed won out. Lastly, I oddly liked how it was unclear whether or not Prince Xizor died (at least, that's the way I heard it). I Didn't Like: The first thing I didn't like was how much Dash Rendar was like Han Solo. Now, I've heard that the character was created for the game, so maybe Perry had very little choice in how Dash was supposed to be. Okay, I understand that. But still, couldn't Perry have tried a wee bit harder to make Dash unique and not so much like Han? I couldn't help but wince when I read him in a scene. Xizor is often uplifted as this really great villain, and I am just unsure why. Sure, he plots and schemes in this book, but, partly because he is doomed to fail, nothing happens of it. All he does is exercise, change clothes, and seduce women. I wish Perry had allowed Xizor some way of winning something, just so I could be assured he was a real threat, instead of a dandified playboy. And I almost didn't even want to start reading the novel when Xizor miraculously knows that Vader is Anakin Skywalker. No one knows that! How does he? Another problem I have is how this book feels like filler. Other than a few nice tie-ins (Leia getting the Boushh costume, the thermal detonator, Luke's lightsaber, the Bothan spies), the whole book is just filler. We all know the outcome, there is little suspense, there is little to engage us. It doesn't help when circumstances keep repeating themselves (Leia gets kidnapped to lure Luke to Coruscant, like done in Empire, Dash Rendar returns to help like Han returned to help Luke in A New Hope, Luke and Lando hide in a surprisingly dense asteroid field, and so on). My last complaint is about Perry's writing style. I found it quite juvenile, filled with simple, embarrassing sentences. Here is one such example: [Luke:] "Stand back. Let's see if it will stop a lightsaber." The door would not stop a lightsaber. They went through and continued to climb. Not only does the above excerpt contain an unnecessary and embarrassing line of dialogue made of pure cheese, the narration is boring, uninspired, and uninteresting. I have no idea how Luke sliced the door, where, if he cut a chunk or the whole thing off, if there were people right behind him or anything. In fact, all this scene does is give us filler, more padding to drag out the big escape. Dialogue/Sexual Situation/Violence: Light to none spattering of mild profanity. Prince Xizor fancies himself a player and makes the moves on Leia. We have space battles, attempted murders, lightsaber battles, rescues, kidnappings, etc. Overall: One of the better Star Wars novels out there, Shadows of the Empire is entertaining but not hugely memorable. Not a bad book to put on your reading list, but I wouldn't rush out to read it anytime soon.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Einzige

    A rather charming satire of that confusing but important event for Catholics - Vatician II. It playfully describes the struggle between Neo Scholasiticsm and the modernist Nouvelle Théologie for dominance over Catholic theology and the Papacy. The book's Starwars setting makes what would otherwise be a technical and dry matter quite fun. Hence you have Yves Cognar represented by Xizor (who literally runs a criminal organisation named the Black Sun) battling for influence and control against a Re A rather charming satire of that confusing but important event for Catholics - Vatician II. It playfully describes the struggle between Neo Scholasiticsm and the modernist Nouvelle Théologie for dominance over Catholic theology and the Papacy. The book's Starwars setting makes what would otherwise be a technical and dry matter quite fun. Hence you have Yves Cognar represented by Xizor (who literally runs a criminal organisation named the Black Sun) battling for influence and control against a Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange Darth Vader with a focus on the Liturgy which is cleverly represented by Luke Skywalker. This means you get things like Cognar's famous rebuke of a conservative priest at the council being transformed into Xizor beating up a muscle-bound assassin and Garrigou-Lagrange's blistering critique of modernist theology in the Humani generis being shown as a space battle which destroys the palace of modernism. Of course whilst this all well and good Perry has taken some liberties and suffered from a few holes - notably with Garrigou-Lagrange presence and probably would have benefited from Cardinal Cognars Journals which were published a few years after this was written. Still a quirky satire that is worthwhile if only for its novelty whilst still being an acceptable read to those who dont have an interest in the development of Catholic theology or ecclesiastical politics .

  6. 5 out of 5

    StoryTellerShannon

    I lasted through 40 pages or so of this novel. The concept sounded interesting; a rival vs Darth Vader for the affections of the Emperor. But the problem is that the concept wasn't fully mined nor not even partially enough to make it interesting enough. Furthermore, every other chapter jumped to the Star Wars characters in which they rehashed stuff from the movies just like the crime lord character who was opposed to Vader. I get that he hates Vader but do I have to hear it for pages and pages of I lasted through 40 pages or so of this novel. The concept sounded interesting; a rival vs Darth Vader for the affections of the Emperor. But the problem is that the concept wasn't fully mined nor not even partially enough to make it interesting enough. Furthermore, every other chapter jumped to the Star Wars characters in which they rehashed stuff from the movies just like the crime lord character who was opposed to Vader. I get that he hates Vader but do I have to hear it for pages and pages of internal thoughts? Moreover, half of what Vader and the Emperor talk about is . . . wait for it . . . from the movies! No thank you. WHEN READ: January to February 2012 OVERALL GRADE: C minus.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Darcy

    by Steve Perry, published in 1996. This Star Wars novel, ‘Shadows of the Empire’, fits exactly between the Star Wars movies ‘The Empire Strikes Back’ and ‘Return of the Jedi’ and is even sanctioned by that Lucas guy. As you recall Han is kinda frozen, Luke is not quite done his training and Lando has possession of the Falcon and Leia is, well Leia and Chewie still snarls a lot. What this novel does well is set a good fast pace of activities in the Star Wars universe and really fill in how Luke bui by Steve Perry, published in 1996. This Star Wars novel, ‘Shadows of the Empire’, fits exactly between the Star Wars movies ‘The Empire Strikes Back’ and ‘Return of the Jedi’ and is even sanctioned by that Lucas guy. As you recall Han is kinda frozen, Luke is not quite done his training and Lando has possession of the Falcon and Leia is, well Leia and Chewie still snarls a lot. What this novel does well is set a good fast pace of activities in the Star Wars universe and really fill in how Luke built his new light saber and what Leia and Chewie and Lando did between movies. And as far as that goes a pretty decent job was done. But, since Han is frozen in carbonite sitting pretty in Jabba’s throne room, I guess the author felt the readers really needed another Han and so created Dash Rendar . . . Yeah, that’s what I thought to. I thought the Clone Wars were long over . . . Perhaps the neatest creation, to give the author some credit back, is Xizor the head of Black Sun the evil underground crime network of the Star Wars Universe - if you are a super geek you will also know that there was a plastic model kit made of Xizor, an actual full length movie soundtrack and other marketing goodies just like it was an actual movie release. So, back to Xizor. Pretty decent character as far as evil characters go; ruthless, charming and reptilian with a juiced up pheremone system to drive all the humanoid ladies wild when he so chooses - no really. And you can guess that at some point in the novel Leia gets to sample his scent, but I won’t spoil it for you here. The actual writing itself left me a bit annoyed. The sentences are too damn short. And repetitive. And too melodrama. Just too much. Way too much. Really too much, it was. If you follow me. Still, the writing style aside, the story is pretty decent and we get to see Darth Vader pitted against Xizor in a competition to win the Emperor’s favours. Good rivalry there for sure and yeah, since you’ve seen ‘Return of the Jedi’ you can guess which evil villain wins. Overall a worthwhile bit of time spent with your favourite Star Wars characters. I really would have liked to not see Dash Rendar though - the Han Solo clone. You do get to see how and where Leia gets her funky bounty hunter suit though and how the Emperor let the rebels get the new Death Star plans - It’s a trap! I leave it up to you. If you are a Star Wars geek you will likely need to read this book since it ties up a bunch of activities between movies and is treated as official Star Wars Universe stuff. If you just like the movies (the first three produced, not the last three) you can skip this book and never knew it existed. May the . . . Nope, not gonna do it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Good solid airplane fun reading. The usual Star Wars cliches and weaknesses apply, but what were you expecting from a Star Wars novel, existential philosophy? It's fun seeing Luke, Leia et. al. during their original series prime, and Luke as a Jedi in training is more entertaining than his omnipotent later incarnations. The characters are a bit more vulnerable and human than in other books (this book has more "adult situations" than all the others combined, but that isn't saying much), so it's c Good solid airplane fun reading. The usual Star Wars cliches and weaknesses apply, but what were you expecting from a Star Wars novel, existential philosophy? It's fun seeing Luke, Leia et. al. during their original series prime, and Luke as a Jedi in training is more entertaining than his omnipotent later incarnations. The characters are a bit more vulnerable and human than in other books (this book has more "adult situations" than all the others combined, but that isn't saying much), so it's certainly worthwhile if you're a Star Wars fan.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I'd heard good things about SoTE, had fond memories of the game, and honestly thought the plot sounded pretty good in summary. Unfortunately, Steve Perry's execution of it was terrifically worthless. He includes not one but two Gary Stus - Dash Rendar and Prince Xizor. This is generally a bad way to design characters. However, the real problem with SoTE is that Perry never escapes the tropes of the SW universe. I realize there is a fine line between repetitious, predictable tropes and the archet I'd heard good things about SoTE, had fond memories of the game, and honestly thought the plot sounded pretty good in summary. Unfortunately, Steve Perry's execution of it was terrifically worthless. He includes not one but two Gary Stus - Dash Rendar and Prince Xizor. This is generally a bad way to design characters. However, the real problem with SoTE is that Perry never escapes the tropes of the SW universe. I realize there is a fine line between repetitious, predictable tropes and the archetypes and mythological patterns that are central to SW, but it seems like the editors could have kept this piece of clumsy fan-fiction grade writing off the shelves. Every character is motivated by murdered family members, everyone is a played-out stereotype of a character with a few major traits that are turned up to the max, and all the action occurs in bursts of stereotyped scenes - chase scenes, fight scenes, etc, which all end predictably and follow the patterns. Nor are the plot arcs really developed in a way that emphasizes their relative importance. The Suprosa bit, crucial to setting up ROTJ, came out of nowhere, went by quickly and without much attention, and didn't give me any reason to care about the Bothan pilots. So what if half the squadron died, and they were rookies? If it had been a larger battle, and they'd been members of a no-name random x-wing squadron, they'd never get mentioned again. Another reviewer made some comment to the effect that, if you're picking a star wars novel, you can't be expecting "existential philosophy." But fortunately, many authors have recently raised the bar in SW to the point that I do now have high expectations of SW novels. The KOTOR games, Matthew Stover's novels, as well as select other novels written by people who care and know how to write, and also including the excellent essential guides and rpg sourcebooks written by people who care as much or more, have done great things for the quality of new Star Wars stories. Enjoy one of them, and don't bother with SoTE. Read a summary instead.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    I can easily guess why George Lucas never went on to make his planned third trilogy (Episodes 7-9) by perusing the sci-fi section of any bookstore: he didn't need to. There are a slew of other writers who have carried on the Star Wars mythos. Probably better than Lucas's movies would have been, in my opinion. I have read a small handful of the Star Wars novels, and some are better than others. Back in the mid-'90s, best-selling sci-fi author Steve Perry jumped on the Star Wars bandwagon with hi I can easily guess why George Lucas never went on to make his planned third trilogy (Episodes 7-9) by perusing the sci-fi section of any bookstore: he didn't need to. There are a slew of other writers who have carried on the Star Wars mythos. Probably better than Lucas's movies would have been, in my opinion. I have read a small handful of the Star Wars novels, and some are better than others. Back in the mid-'90s, best-selling sci-fi author Steve Perry jumped on the Star Wars bandwagon with his novel "Shadows of the Empire", a continuation of the events of Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, before the events of Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. It's basically a filler novel, completely superfluous, but entertaining nonetheless. It's also one of the better Star Wars novels I have read, second only to the terrific Timothy Zahn three-book series. Perry's book does several things well: 1) It develops Darth Vader's character by giving us insight into his reasons for wanting Luke Skywalker alive, at first for strategic reasons (bringing Luke to the Dark Side would make the Empire more powerful) and gradually for more familial reasons (deep deep down, Vader truly does love his son), leading to his eventual redemption in ROTJ. 2) It helps to explain Leia's inexplicable turn-around in TESB from being completely indifferent to Han to falling in love with him, as we see a fully-developed independent woman who thinks she knows what she wants in a man, until she meets the ruggedly charming Han Solo, who throws her whole world-view out of whack. 3) It also foreshadows Leia's own powers of the Force, which Vader begins to pick up on. Perry also knows how to write action/adventure and keep the pace at break-neck speed. A good read for uber-geeks like me who love Star Wars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    This was my first foray into reading a genre book from a franchise. I've been watching the original Star Wars films with my daughter. We haven't watched Return of the Jedi yet and, somehow, during some Web meandering, I discovered this book was written in the '90s to fill some narrative gaps between the TESB & RotJ. I like to try things I wouldn't normally do and reading a Star Wars book is definitely one of them. The writing was all over the place in quality, in my opinion. There'd be passa This was my first foray into reading a genre book from a franchise. I've been watching the original Star Wars films with my daughter. We haven't watched Return of the Jedi yet and, somehow, during some Web meandering, I discovered this book was written in the '90s to fill some narrative gaps between the TESB & RotJ. I like to try things I wouldn't normally do and reading a Star Wars book is definitely one of them. The writing was all over the place in quality, in my opinion. There'd be passages where the content masked the simplistic writing, but once the story was mired down in an action sequence, the whole thing just got ridiculous. I don't think I'd ever seen exclamation points outside of dialogue in a book that wasn't aimed at children. "Luke's lightsaber blocked the thrust!" One interesting character was introduced (Prince Zixor) and one absolutely shameless, ridiculous ersatz Han Solo character was introduced (Dash Rendar). All in all, I don't regret reading it, but don't think I'll come back to the SW literary galaxy anytime soon.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Cress

    This was one of the better Star Wars books that I read. I can easily see how there was a big marketing campaign with video game ties ins built around this big in the mid 90s. The thing I liked most about this book was that something happened on just about every page. There was very little down time and I could swear that I could hear the John Williams soundtrack in the background at times. Also, the main villain, Xizor, was very credible opponent to Luke, Lea, and even Vader. Both Xizor and Vade This was one of the better Star Wars books that I read. I can easily see how there was a big marketing campaign with video game ties ins built around this big in the mid 90s. The thing I liked most about this book was that something happened on just about every page. There was very little down time and I could swear that I could hear the John Williams soundtrack in the background at times. Also, the main villain, Xizor, was very credible opponent to Luke, Lea, and even Vader. Both Xizor and Vader wanted to capture Luke but for different reasons (Vader to turn to the dark side and Xizor for money/power) so they seemed to work together but yet also wanted to destroy each other without wanting to let on that this was an additional goal. I was a clever twist. I enjoyed this one a great deal and if you aspire to be a Jedi as I then this is a must read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    3.5 stars, actually, but as that's not an option... SPOILERS AHOY This was a reread of one of the very first Star Wars novels I ever read, way back when I was twelve years old. I worried about how it would hold up, wondered how much I'd forgotten, and was curious to see how it slotted into all the prequels and novels that have since come out. It's hard to deny that there's something about Shadows that is just classic - it at least used to be one of the more well known EU titles, and it fills in wh 3.5 stars, actually, but as that's not an option... SPOILERS AHOY This was a reread of one of the very first Star Wars novels I ever read, way back when I was twelve years old. I worried about how it would hold up, wondered how much I'd forgotten, and was curious to see how it slotted into all the prequels and novels that have since come out. It's hard to deny that there's something about Shadows that is just classic - it at least used to be one of the more well known EU titles, and it fills in what happens to Luke, Leia, Chewie, Lando, Artoo, and Threepio in the interim between The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. The book centers around the introduction of a character who was created by Steve Perry, Prince Xizor, a Falleen crime lord who serves as a rival to Darth Vader for the Emperor's favor. Just as before, I really enjoyed watching Vader contend with this sort of competition, and I feel like the moments of insight we get into Vader's mind really do mesh with the man who was Anakin Skywalker that we came to know in the prequels. Perry does a fantastic job of capturing every character's voice from the films, which is definitely the most enjoyable aspect of the book. It exists in that awkward period of time in which Leia and Luke still are nursing a lot of confused sexual tension with each other, but I think it manages to handle it well, as they struggle to figure out exactly what it is that they feel for each other, without it ever venturing too far off into the weirdly taboo. The action is great, the humor is there, the feel is unmistakably Star Wars, and it's definitely an enjoyable ride. I think there are three points worth mentioning that are arguably rocky. 1) This is the introduction of Dash Rendar, who serves as an unapologetic Han replacement since he's frozen in carbonite for the length of the book. They very specifically wanted to contrast him to Han, and I actually do appreciate the ways in which they did - by creating a character who is a swaggering mercenary-minded jackass and acknowledging that they were creating someone who was supposed to be very DIFFERENT from Han, there's a recognition that a lot of the tropes that are often ascribed to Han Solo by fanboys are just not actual aspects of his character. They are, however, part of Dash, but it still reads like he's a poor man's Han, living in his shadow and existing to fill in the 'gap' in the trio. I really wish, honestly, that Perry would have just let Lando do the job - some of my favorite parts of the book involve watching Lando's friendship with Leia and Luke evolve in the wake of his 'betrayal' on Cloud City. 2) Xizor. I have a lot of problems with the term Mary Sue, but I'm not fond of the term Gary Stu either, and that's something that Xizor gets accused of being often. It's easy to see why the writing revolving around him makes some people cringe: he's a master martial artist, impossibly rich, intelligent, handsome, built, has endless contacts at his disposal, and, well. There's that whole 'secretes pheromones' thing that seems like it jumped right off the pages of a 15 year old's fanfiction. While I'll get more to that in my last point, I'm going to say that Xizor WASN'T AS BAD as I remember, if only because this time I realized that scenes with Xizor are almost always written from HIS POINT OF VIEW. We can talk about characters who are impossibly perfect, but the fact of the matter is Xizor's hubris is his number one weakness, and never is that more well-illustrated in the very narration of his thoughts about himself. Of course Xizor sounds perfect - he is fully convinced that he is. But clearly, when he is foiled by Leia, then Luke, then Vader, he is anything but. 3) Leia. As the only major female character in this book other than Xizor's sex robot/bodyguard Guri (seriously), Leia was carrying a lot on her shoulders in these early days of Star Wars novels, before a huge stock of other strong females had been introduced and the expected audience of the books widened to include, gasp, women. This is definitely a conflicting book to read for Leia fans: Perry spends a lot of time in her head, which is appreciable, and he doesn't do a terrible job of it - while she does often think about her romantic feelings for Luke and Han, they aren't her primary concern and she more often than not chastises herself not to think about them right now, showing that she has her priorities well in order. But this is also definitely the EU book where Leia is sexualized the most: Xizor becomes sexually obsessed with Leia and spends most of the book trying to "seduce" her. There's no disguising the non-consensual nature of this whole situation, and I wish that Leia had been allowed to snap out of it without any assistance from Chewbacca. Her 'strong will' in the face of Xizor's willingness to basically drug her into submission is repeatedly pointed out, but there's just as much overindulgent internal narrative where she's starting to fall prey to said pheromones, and it's all kind of embarrassing when you consider how Leia got to at least openly murder Jabba when he tried to sexually control her. As a 12 year old girl, it was all a little titillating to read, if only because we don't see a lot in the way of sex in Star Wars novels period, but it's also unfortunate that one of the few times we do, it's an attempted rape of Leia. All that in mind, I do really like Shadows, and it stood up to the test of time, and slots in well with the canon still. We get to see a side of Vader that we don't often, and the development of the relationships between film characters makes this an important EU read, in my opinion, if not an example of its best writing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paul Heingarten

    Interesting narrative that fits pretty snug between Episodes V and VI. It was fun for me getting into the story and the heads of Luke, Leia, and even Lando as they piece together the eventual rescue of Han as well as deal with a number of twists and other adversaries in their way. The treatment of the characters is pretty faithful to their on-screen personas, a fan of the Star Wars saga should enjoy this one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Thompson

    I wasn't sure about this one because some reviews said it was 'a must for all Star Wars fans!' and others said 'only for the die-hard fan.' I would say it's somewhere in between. If you're into Star Wars fiction, it's worth a read, but I do think the quality is on the mediocre scale. The story itself is fun, and they get enough content in there to make it its own story, not just a 'filler'. The villain, Prince Xizor, head of the Black Sun crime syndicate, is interesting, and I liked his rivalry w I wasn't sure about this one because some reviews said it was 'a must for all Star Wars fans!' and others said 'only for the die-hard fan.' I would say it's somewhere in between. If you're into Star Wars fiction, it's worth a read, but I do think the quality is on the mediocre scale. The story itself is fun, and they get enough content in there to make it its own story, not just a 'filler'. The villain, Prince Xizor, head of the Black Sun crime syndicate, is interesting, and I liked his rivalry with Vader (because it makes Vader more interesting), but Xizor's bits did tend to be long-winded. His POV sections and monologues could have been paired down a lot. There is a Han substitute, since he's currently frozen in carbonite, in the form of Dash Rendar -a cocky smuggler/pirate/mercenary/ace pilot who 'only cares about getting paid'. It was made a little less irksome because Luke and Leia are constantly comparing him to Han, so their similarities are noted, and he was kind of fun, but I honestly would have liked it better if the twist was he genuinely only cared about getting paid. As it stood, it felt rather like a carbon copy. Speaking of Han, one thing I really liked is Leia struggling with this question of what might happen after they -if they ever- free Han. She loves him. She's head over heels in love with him. She told him so. And he said 'I know.' Does that mean he loves her too? Or...or... I just loved this, because it's completely genuine. And speaking of feelings, Perry had fun messing with readers. This is before Luke and Leia are twins, right? And Luke still totally has a crush on Leia, right? And Leia cares about Luke, but not the same way she cares about Han, and why are feelings so COMPLICATED?! I laughed and I winced. (But don't worry; there was no more kissing.) The story is full of hints and events leading into Return of the Jedi, right down to the Bothans gaining 'critical information' that Luke is sure he'll be briefed on soon enough. The best part about this book by far was getting inside Darth Vader's head, even for a little bit. There are tidbits and tiny, tiny hints about how RotJ is going to end, without making him sympathetic. I loved that they were so subtle it did not ruin his eventual turn. On that note, I do wish Perry had given us one final hint at the end. It seemed like the perfect opportunity, and it was completely passed up. This novel supposedly shows the events between Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, where Luke goes from 'NOOOOOOOOOOO!' of finding out Darth Vader is his dad to 'I can still sense the good in him.' It didn't occur to me until I was reading this book, which has Luke still dealing with this revelation, that this transition of his was kind of...sudden. I felt this would have been the perfect time for Luke to sense something still good in Vader, because in this story Vader admits to himself that a part of Anakin has survived in him -and he's determined to destroy it. He realizes a part of the Jedi is still alive inside and that it's keeping him from fully embracing the dark side. For the last 50 pages I was waiting and waiting for Luke to sense this in Vader, to have this realization, but no. A perfect moment squandered. *sigh* Like I said, it's worth a read if you like the Star Wars fiction, because if nothing else, it helps you to embrace the universe and, as you can see, really deepens your appreciation for it by getting you to analyze and question all the little details.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Oppenlander

    Set in the time between Episode V and Episode VI, "Shadows of the Empire" has Leia, Luke, Lando, Chewie and the droids looking for Han Solo, who has been frozen in carbonite and taken away by the bounty hunter Boba Fett. The heroes of the Rebellion are aided in their quest by a few other characters, including a hotshot, smart-aleck pilot named Dash Rendar who in many ways fills in for Han Solo who, for obvious reasons, does not appear in this book. Meanwhile, we are introduced to Prince Xizor, a Set in the time between Episode V and Episode VI, "Shadows of the Empire" has Leia, Luke, Lando, Chewie and the droids looking for Han Solo, who has been frozen in carbonite and taken away by the bounty hunter Boba Fett. The heroes of the Rebellion are aided in their quest by a few other characters, including a hotshot, smart-aleck pilot named Dash Rendar who in many ways fills in for Han Solo who, for obvious reasons, does not appear in this book. Meanwhile, we are introduced to Prince Xizor, a humanoid but reptilian alien who is the shadowy leader of an enormous interstellar crime syndicate. Xizor is attempting to curry favor with the Emperor, but Darth Vader sees him as a threat to his own favored status with his Master. When Xizor realizes that Vader has a weakness - namely his desire to capture his son and turn him to the Dark Side of the Force - he uses this knowledge against Vader, attempting to capture Luke himself and deliver his dead body to the Emperor. This is one of those books in which there is a lot of plot, but not much happens. There are space battles, heroes captured by their enemies followed by daring escapes and even some cloak and dagger work, but none of it seems to amount to much in the end. One of the problems is in setting stakes - Vader, the Emperor and Xizor are all clearly manipulating various events to their own ends. Because of this none of the situations that our protagonists find themselves in seem particularly important. We know that things are moving toward a final showdown between our band of Rebels and Xizor and everything up until then just feels like smoke and mirrors. I will mention one thing I did particularly like in this book, plus one thing that I really didn't care for. First, the good thing. Perry does a nice job of showing us various stages in Luke's evolution as a Jedi. We know that Luke's training was incomplete when he left Yoda and that he is shaken by his first duel with Vader in Episode V. But by the time Luke enters Jabba's palace in Episode VI, he has fully assumed his authority as a Jedi Knight. This book shows us how his confidence grows over several battles and other incidents where his Jedi training serves him in good stead. The thing I really didn't care for was Xizor's attempted seduction of Princess Leia. I know a damsel in distress is a stock trope in melodramatic literature going back for hundreds of years. And I know that a sexually unsafe character can make a particularly nasty villain. But to have the character of Xizor essentially exude a "date rape" pheromone that overwhelms Leia and puts her in jeopardy seemed completely unnecessary here. Besides, part of the reason we like Leia as a character is because she doesn't play the "damsel in distress" card very often. She is much more likely to take control of her own destiny. Oh, and one other little complaint, why don't Luke and the others know that Han will be taken to Jabba? The whole premise of the book is that they have to track Boba Fett and find out where he took Han. Wouldn't Fett just take Han to Jabba as quickly as he could to claim his reward? Overall, this book is a very mixed bag. It is mildly entertaining, but uneven and ultimately, not particularly memorable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    ***SPOILERS ABOUND*** The 3-stars on this review should be taken as 3-stars for a Star Wars book, not for just any book. I don't think that it's fair to read these puffed up pieces of fan-fiction as actual books and the rating reflects this. I have known about Shadows of the Empire since it was released in 1996. I was in middle school and I totally bought in to the marketing. I collected Star Wars figures at the time, and despite not having read the central piece in the media onslaught, I got figur ***SPOILERS ABOUND*** The 3-stars on this review should be taken as 3-stars for a Star Wars book, not for just any book. I don't think that it's fair to read these puffed up pieces of fan-fiction as actual books and the rating reflects this. I have known about Shadows of the Empire since it was released in 1996. I was in middle school and I totally bought in to the marketing. I collected Star Wars figures at the time, and despite not having read the central piece in the media onslaught, I got figures for Xizor, Dash Rendar, and even Chewbacca in his transvestite bounty hunter disguise. For the past 16 years, I had just assumed that this was a rather epic story centered around Dash Rendar, and that the quality control was comparatively higher than other, less promoted Star Wars novels. I was wrong. The first thing that struck me was how weak the writing in the initial chapters is. I'm not sure if the writing improves as the novel progresses, or if I simply became accustomed to it. Regardless, the writing is not fantastic. I also found the characterization to be rather poor. Darth Vader stands out in particular. Take this scene, for example. Xizor supplies the Empire with the location of an unguarded Rebel base, to which Vader replies "I'll have my agents check it out." He'll WHAT?? I cannot imagine Vader ever saying "check it out". How about "I'll send my agents to investigate" or...ANYTHING but "check it out". Vader's dialogue was constantly off-key. Also, Dash Rendar's existence baffles me. He was left completely one-dimensional, given very little "screen-time", and the roles he fulfills could have been accomplished by Wedge or another one of the already existing side characters who also appear in the book. ***SPOILER*** His sudden death and the emotional weight we're apparently supposed to feel was, at most, shrug-worthy. Why was this character created? The most obvious answer is to sell merchandise. Hell, I bought the toy. The design of the toy was infinitely cooler than his portrayal in the book. To wrap things up, I also didn't like the way they shoe-horned in connections to Return of the Jedi. The Bothan acquisition of the Death Star plans, Leia and the Boushh suit, and...probably some other things. I didn't think the inclusion of these connections was clever. Moreover, they took me out of the fantasy and served as a reminder that there were human hands guiding the story. Was Shadows of the Empire entertaining? Sure. But given the push behind it, I expected more. Most of my satisfaction comes from finally reading this piece of Star Wars history. If you aren't interested in that, I'd say skip it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This one was okay, but ended up dragging a bit. It's set between the second and third movie and I thought it would be more about working on a plan to rescue Han, but it was mostly about an attempt on Luke's life and working to defeat that. And, okay, but I know how that turns out! You do get to see into Darth Vader's thoughts, and it's fun to see Leia thinking, "Okay, I love Han, but I also feel connected to Luke!" But I finished this a few days ago and can't tell you much about the actual plot. (A This one was okay, but ended up dragging a bit. It's set between the second and third movie and I thought it would be more about working on a plan to rescue Han, but it was mostly about an attempt on Luke's life and working to defeat that. And, okay, but I know how that turns out! You do get to see into Darth Vader's thoughts, and it's fun to see Leia thinking, "Okay, I love Han, but I also feel connected to Luke!" But I finished this a few days ago and can't tell you much about the actual plot. (Also, my ebook copy didn't have line breaks between scene switches. That didn't make for the best reading experience.)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    This was excellent. I know 'Shadows' is well known, and has been out quite a while. I'm late getting to a lot of Star Wars novels. I really enjoyed how this story bridged the gap between 'Empire' and 'Jedi', but still managed to be fresh, original, and add memorable characters like Dash Rendar and Xizor. Well worth my time.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    It may have been good if I'd read it when I was 10.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Adds texture to the Star Wars universe between episodes Five and Six, but adds no essential knowledge

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Coffey

    Star Wars Shadows of the Empire was the first Star Wars book I had ever read. As an extreme Star Wars fan, I can tell you that this book is not one to pass up. If you are an original trilogy fan, I honestly believe that you will love this book. Taking place between Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back and Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, the story mainly involves Princess Leia coming up with a plan and forming a crew to rescue her recently-captured Han Solo, who was frozen in carbonite as a prize f Star Wars Shadows of the Empire was the first Star Wars book I had ever read. As an extreme Star Wars fan, I can tell you that this book is not one to pass up. If you are an original trilogy fan, I honestly believe that you will love this book. Taking place between Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back and Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, the story mainly involves Princess Leia coming up with a plan and forming a crew to rescue her recently-captured Han Solo, who was frozen in carbonite as a prize for Jabba the Hutt. But that’s not all the book as to offer. The book does a fantastic job at portraying a new and interesting villain (who is almost on the same level as Lord Vader), named Prince Xizor. Both the Emperor and Vader see the Xizor as a dangerous threat, as he is one of the most powerful entities in the universe. Luke Skywalker also plays an interesting role in the story. The book goes into heavy detail about his Jedi training and how he learned to use certain force abilities, as well as how he constructed his new lightsaber. This information was much needed as the original trilogy films didn’t really explain these things very well. The book also went into more detail about the Lando Calrissian, who was original introduced as a new character in Episode V. I think the book does an excellent job at portraying Calrissian’s character and adding him as a new addition to the crew. Overall, there were many things I liked about this book and only a few things I didn’t. I really did like certain aspects of Luke’s Jedi training, such as him returning to Old Ben’s house in order to construct his new lightsaber. I also liked Luke’s thoughts about the light and the dark side, and how the dark sided thoughts tempted him, though he resisted the temptations. I thought these additions added depth to Luke’s character and helped shape him into who he was at the Start of Episode VI. My only complaint would be that the story felt like it was dragged out at certain times, there was a lot of unnecessary storytelling in between specific plot points. Overall, the book felt well thought out and put together. I appreciated the author’s attention to detail and I look forward to reading more of his Star Wars books.

  24. 4 out of 5

    EdwinB_D2

    The mastermind behind the Black Sun criminal organization, the Dark Prince Xizor is competing for the Emperors favor, against Darth Vader. After finally being able to strike against Vader, Xizor finds his plans foiled by a Corellian Smuggler called Han Solo. You would like this book if you like Star Wars and fantasy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marco Brunello

    I became curious about Shadows of the Empire almost 20 years ago when I had the chance to play the video game for Windows, which I have enjoyed a lot. More recently I had the chance to listen to the beautiful soundtrack by Joel McNeely and read the comic book adaptation written by John “Dredd” Wagner... and in the end, I managed to read the main element of this Star Wars multimedia project: the novel. My experience with the Star Wars Expanded Universe is mainly with video games and comics, so thi I became curious about Shadows of the Empire almost 20 years ago when I had the chance to play the video game for Windows, which I have enjoyed a lot. More recently I had the chance to listen to the beautiful soundtrack by Joel McNeely and read the comic book adaptation written by John “Dredd” Wagner... and in the end, I managed to read the main element of this Star Wars multimedia project: the novel. My experience with the Star Wars Expanded Universe is mainly with video games and comics, so this was basically my first Star Wars novel, and I have not been disappointed: the way the story is built, the mise-en-scène of known and new characters is pure Star Wars. If the purpose of the Shadows of the Empire project was sort of making a new Star Wars movie without actually making the film, in my opinion this was 100% accomplished, because reading this novel was just like watching a proper Star Wars movie - fitting perfectly between Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. I think that there are only two little flaws. One is the length, but more in specific a portion of the novel: towards the middle, when a few characters are “parked” somewhere while waiting for their contact, and getting bored in doing so; I have to admit, I got bored with them, as this part of the novel seems for no reason slightly longer that it should be. The second thing is the characterisation of Dash Rendar: he is the protagonist of the video game, and I hoped to see further character development about him in the novel. Unfortunately he is overshadowed by the main characters (Luke, Leila, Lando...) and roughly depicted just as a cockier version of Han Solo; also there is no trace of his sidekick Leebo in this novel, in my opinion missing another opportunity to discover a bit more about these two important characters from the Expanded Universe (after all Dash Rendar is the guy who stole the plans of the second Death Star). However, I need to remark that Shadows of the Empire does not feel like just yet another tie-in, but something so well made that should be considered canon despite not being one of the main motion pictures – a bit like another video game, The Fate of Atlantis, for the Indiana Jones franchise. I totally recommend this book to any Star Wars fan, it genuinely feels like part of the saga, in my opinion much more than the Disneyan official sequel The Force Awakens. Definitely one of my favourite Star Wars stories.

  26. 5 out of 5

    James Caterino

    It seems inconceivable I somehow did not read this book back in the late '90s when I was devouring anything "Star Wars". Part of it was the backlash "Shadows" was getting at the time in the genre magazines, especially "Sci-fi Universe", still the best science fiction mag of all time outside of the old "Cinefantastique". And part of it was there was so much Extended Universe stuff hitting the shelves, between the "Heir to Empire" trilogy and "The Jedi Academy" trilogy and the "X-Wing" series and It seems inconceivable I somehow did not read this book back in the late '90s when I was devouring anything "Star Wars". Part of it was the backlash "Shadows" was getting at the time in the genre magazines, especially "Sci-fi Universe", still the best science fiction mag of all time outside of the old "Cinefantastique". And part of it was there was so much Extended Universe stuff hitting the shelves, between the "Heir to Empire" trilogy and "The Jedi Academy" trilogy and the "X-Wing" series and the Dark Horse Comics etc., there was plenty to indulge in and almost all of it was really good material written by top notch scribes. Well now I have read it and can tell you those "Shadows" backlash reviews back in the day were just that, emotional reactions reviewers have when they feel the need to push back on something wildly popular. If you were around in the late '90s and are a "Star Wars" fan you know what I am talking about. Because, bottom line, "Shadows of the Empire" is a glorious novel; a rich, vivid tapestry of riveting drama, political manipulations, and colorful action adventure. Prince Xizor is a fantastic character! The second best Extended Universe character of all time behind Mara Jade. Xizor is Tony Montana, Lex Luthor, Gordon Gekko, Michael Corleone and Al Capone rolled into one with physical (including sexual seduction) abilities that match his cold, calculating, intellect. If ever there was someone who could go up against Darth Vader and Palpatine and make for a worthy opponent, this is the guy. The viewpoints are dead-on, the pacing perfect, and Perry gets all of the familiar characters just right. This book excels at world-building just as much as it does characters. The setting is richly detailed, a vast underworld of the "Star Wars" universe hinted at in the final act of "Empire" and the opening set-piece in "Jedi" and fully explored here in an irresistible fashion by author Steve Perry. At its core, "Shadows of the Empire" is an epic gangster story that makes fantastic use of the most interesting period in all of the "Star Wars", the time between "Empire" and "Jedi". This ranks right up there with my favorite "Star Wars" EU book of all-time, right alongside K.W. Jeter's Boba Fett/Bounty Hunter Trilogy, Timothy Zahn's "Heir to the Empire" trilogy, the "X-Wing" series, and the Dark Horse comic "Dark Empire". Bottom line: "Shadows of the Empire" is pure exhilarating joy for fans of classic "Star Wars".

  27. 5 out of 5

    Grayce

    Shadows of the Empire tells the story between episodes V and VI. It follows the adventures of Lando, Chewie, Leia, Luke, and a character who first appears in this book- Dash Rendar. Much of the story focuses on a battle of wits and espionage between Darth Vader and Prince Xizor (head of the crime syndicate Black Sun). Shadows of the Empire gives much depth to Xizor's character. Many paragraph breaks within chapters make the pace seem faster and allow Perry to switch the perspective between sever Shadows of the Empire tells the story between episodes V and VI. It follows the adventures of Lando, Chewie, Leia, Luke, and a character who first appears in this book- Dash Rendar. Much of the story focuses on a battle of wits and espionage between Darth Vader and Prince Xizor (head of the crime syndicate Black Sun). Shadows of the Empire gives much depth to Xizor's character. Many paragraph breaks within chapters make the pace seem faster and allow Perry to switch the perspective between several characters throughout a single chapter. The beginning pacing is a bit slow but is a fast read towards the later half of the book. This book is a must read for anyone interested in Prince Xizor as Perry spends a lot of time from Xizor's perspective. Perry also spends some time from Vader's perspective and readers get to see him interact with Palpatine. Shadows of the Empire does a good job filling in the story between the movies and gives more depth to Xizor. I would give this book a 3.5 if I could because it was an enjoyable read but not outstanding.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    So far the best of the extended universe novels I have read..this is maybe due to the fact that as it is set between the empire strikes back an return of the Jedi it makes the most use of the characters from the film especially as Vadar and the Emperor are here. Th only main character not about is Han Solo being trapped in Carbonite..certainly the character of Dash Rendar(kind of an intergalactic lord flasheart) Is introduced to plug this gap though I don't really know why...you already have a So So far the best of the extended universe novels I have read..this is maybe due to the fact that as it is set between the empire strikes back an return of the Jedi it makes the most use of the characters from the film especially as Vadar and the Emperor are here. Th only main character not about is Han Solo being trapped in Carbonite..certainly the character of Dash Rendar(kind of an intergalactic lord flasheart) Is introduced to plug this gap though I don't really know why...you already have a Solo type character with Lando and it would have been easy to have used him as the action hero. Anyhow minor criticisms aside this is a good book which not only fills in some gaps between the film's but shows a struggle between the empire and a criminal network called black sun...this really provides much of the action and the regular characters are drawn into a power struggle due to the bounty on Luke's head. All in all great fun and a quick and likeable read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aya

    This book was hard to get into. It has several main characters resulting in lots of short scenes and POV shifts to go along with and even worse, no attempts at smoothing transitions. The writing style is uneven as well, filled with second person idioms and tense shifts. It's not egregiously bad as to be unreadable but annoying mistakes all the same. This book felt like it was written by and for people with ADD. The short scenes and POV shifts broke story momentum and there was nothing to entice This book was hard to get into. It has several main characters resulting in lots of short scenes and POV shifts to go along with and even worse, no attempts at smoothing transitions. The writing style is uneven as well, filled with second person idioms and tense shifts. It's not egregiously bad as to be unreadable but annoying mistakes all the same. This book felt like it was written by and for people with ADD. The short scenes and POV shifts broke story momentum and there was nothing to entice me to keep reading. Reading it felt like a chore, and life's too short to waste on a book that couldn't grab my attention within the first 10%.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alasdair

    A must read for the avid star wars fan, even in light of the nullification of the Expanded Universe's canon status. However, The book, though very well conceptualized, is a very dull read. The inner monologues and back-and-forth conversations are at times contrived and uninteresting, feeling much like glorified fan fiction. In spite of this, there are moments of great excitement for the true Star Wars geek and this makes it worth the read. I would recommend only to the diehards. Everyone else, j A must read for the avid star wars fan, even in light of the nullification of the Expanded Universe's canon status. However, The book, though very well conceptualized, is a very dull read. The inner monologues and back-and-forth conversations are at times contrived and uninteresting, feeling much like glorified fan fiction. In spite of this, there are moments of great excitement for the true Star Wars geek and this makes it worth the read. I would recommend only to the diehards. Everyone else, just play the video game or read a summary. Those are much better uses of your time.

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