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Čar enakih pravic (Discworld #3)

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Ostareli čarovnik umira. Preden umre, mora svojo magijo predati novorojenemu osmemu sinu osmega sina. To mu tudi uspe, vendar pri tem pride do pomote: osmi sin je v resnici hči ... kar je velika katastrofa, ker je magija za čarovnike na Plošči popolnoma drugačna od magije za čarovnice. Posledice tega naključja se pokažejo že čez nekaj let. Eskarina zraste v trmoglavo deklic Ostareli čarovnik umira. Preden umre, mora svojo magijo predati novorojenemu osmemu sinu osmega sina. To mu tudi uspe, vendar pri tem pride do pomote: osmi sin je v resnici hči ... kar je velika katastrofa, ker je magija za čarovnike na Plošči popolnoma drugačna od magije za čarovnice. Posledice tega naključja se pokažejo že čez nekaj let. Eskarina zraste v trmoglavo deklico, potem pa se okrog nje začnejo dogajati nenavadne reči ... Lokalna čarovnica, Babica Vremenovosek, vzame Esk za svojo vajenko in jo hoče vzgojiti za čarovnico, vendar se tudi ona ne zna spoprijeti z moško magijo, ki se budi v deklici. Preostane ji samo še to, da jo spravi na Nevidno univerzo za čarovnike ... vendar tja ženske ne smejo.


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Ostareli čarovnik umira. Preden umre, mora svojo magijo predati novorojenemu osmemu sinu osmega sina. To mu tudi uspe, vendar pri tem pride do pomote: osmi sin je v resnici hči ... kar je velika katastrofa, ker je magija za čarovnike na Plošči popolnoma drugačna od magije za čarovnice. Posledice tega naključja se pokažejo že čez nekaj let. Eskarina zraste v trmoglavo deklic Ostareli čarovnik umira. Preden umre, mora svojo magijo predati novorojenemu osmemu sinu osmega sina. To mu tudi uspe, vendar pri tem pride do pomote: osmi sin je v resnici hči ... kar je velika katastrofa, ker je magija za čarovnike na Plošči popolnoma drugačna od magije za čarovnice. Posledice tega naključja se pokažejo že čez nekaj let. Eskarina zraste v trmoglavo deklico, potem pa se okrog nje začnejo dogajati nenavadne reči ... Lokalna čarovnica, Babica Vremenovosek, vzame Esk za svojo vajenko in jo hoče vzgojiti za čarovnico, vendar se tudi ona ne zna spoprijeti z moško magijo, ki se budi v deklici. Preostane ji samo še to, da jo spravi na Nevidno univerzo za čarovnike ... vendar tja ženske ne smejo.

30 review for Čar enakih pravic (Discworld #3)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    I just recently re-visited this book after a couple years away from it. What's more, I've just recent re-read several of the more recent Witch novels from Pratchett, so they're fresh in my head. Granny Weatherwax is one of my favorite characters of Pratchett's, and as an author, it does me good to see how she began as a character. This book has some rough edges. There's nothing wrong with it, mind you, but it was still very early on in Pratchett's career, and it doesn't have the smoothness of hi I just recently re-visited this book after a couple years away from it. What's more, I've just recent re-read several of the more recent Witch novels from Pratchett, so they're fresh in my head. Granny Weatherwax is one of my favorite characters of Pratchett's, and as an author, it does me good to see how she began as a character. This book has some rough edges. There's nothing wrong with it, mind you, but it was still very early on in Pratchett's career, and it doesn't have the smoothness of his later work. Discworld is not nearly as developed, and neither is his writing style. Granny doesn't have her friend Nanny Ogg as conversational foil and counterpoint in this book, and it's surprising how much that limits her character. What's more, while you can see elements of the character Granny eventually becomes, there's a surprising streak of country bumpkin in here here. In later books she loses most of that (which is for the best) and while she may not be worldly, she is still self-posessed and wise. Another interesting echo is the relationship between Granny and Esk. Twenty years later, Pratchett brought a similar relationship to beautiful fruition with Tiffany Aching. As a result, this book is merely great rather than utterly brilliant. Even rough-hewn early Pratchett is better than 75% of all books out there. As a side note, this is not a bad entry point into reading Discworld. Normally I advise people begin at the beginning of the series, but despite this being the third book of Discworld, it makes for a better start than either of the first two books....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    The problem with Terry Pratchett is that you keep wanting to read the good bits out loud. In this particular case, I'd just reached the line "Her dress would have been both clinging and revealing, if it had had anything to cling to or reveal." Too late, I realized that not all the people around me were going to find this equally funny. I'm still embarrassed. Damn.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    If I was not already a Terry Pratchet fan, I would be after reading this exceptional book. Equal Rites, Sir Terry’s third installment in the Discworld series is a peach of practical magic. Telling the story of a young girl’s conflicting talents for wizardry and / or witchery. In the Discworld, men are wizards and women are witches – at least that is how it has been up to the point when young Eskarina Smith sort of becomes – both. Pratchett spins a deliciously tangled web about the age-old contest If I was not already a Terry Pratchet fan, I would be after reading this exceptional book. Equal Rites, Sir Terry’s third installment in the Discworld series is a peach of practical magic. Telling the story of a young girl’s conflicting talents for wizardry and / or witchery. In the Discworld, men are wizards and women are witches – at least that is how it has been up to the point when young Eskarina Smith sort of becomes – both. Pratchett spins a deliciously tangled web about the age-old contest between the men and the ladies. “I’m not a lady, I’m a witch,” said Granny. Eskarina may be the protagonist but there is no doubt that Granny Weatherwax stole the show. Filling the witch role in the small village of Bad Ass and always appearing in serviceable black, Granny kicks ass and takes names throughout the fun narrative. I am very pleased to learn that my favorite witch will make many more appearances in Pratchett’s series – nine more to be sure. A good witching time atop Great A'Tuin, Equal Rites is one of his best. This would be a great introduction for new Discworld readers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    The Great Pratchett Re-Read Continues! The third book begins the "real" development of the whole Discworld mythos, and rather than focusing on setting, it goes whole-hog (or Witch) into character and a rather deep social issue. It is, at its core, a novel about breaking down the walls that the sexes tend to put up to keep the other side out. Witches can be wizards and vice-versa. :) I didn't appreciate this as much the first time although I got the whole social bit perfectly... and mainly that was The Great Pratchett Re-Read Continues! The third book begins the "real" development of the whole Discworld mythos, and rather than focusing on setting, it goes whole-hog (or Witch) into character and a rather deep social issue. It is, at its core, a novel about breaking down the walls that the sexes tend to put up to keep the other side out. Witches can be wizards and vice-versa. :) I didn't appreciate this as much the first time although I got the whole social bit perfectly... and mainly that was because I hadn't quite gotten as invested in the characters that would soon become the main driving force of the novels. But now that I've had the pleasure of reading every novel, I'm fine. Just fine. But Weatherwax seems to be not quite fully formed here. Isn't that odd? Or perhaps it isn't. This is the first time we see her and I have nothing but fond memories of the woman she reveals herself to be later. BUT, of course, such things always come with time. Thankfully, the wizard/witch battle was still brilliant. :) Standing out was the Head Librarian, again, and Simon. And of course, our little witch was fun to follow but, unfortunately, she's not Tiffany. Even so, I'm so glad to be revisiting all this! :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This was a blast! Introducing: Witch supreme (or that's what I'm calling her) - and that only because of her stare, to say nothing of her actual magical talents. And yes, I can totally see Maggie Smith playing her in a movie! Esk, 8th "son" of an 8th son (on the Discworld, 8 is the most magical number), who inherits the staff of a pretty powerful wizard because - instead of listening to Granny - he is eager to pass on his wizard's staff before he dies and assumes that Esk is going to be a boy. The This was a blast! Introducing: Witch supreme (or that's what I'm calling her) - and that only because of her stare, to say nothing of her actual magical talents. And yes, I can totally see Maggie Smith playing her in a movie! Esk, 8th "son" of an 8th son (on the Discworld, 8 is the most magical number), who inherits the staff of a pretty powerful wizard because - instead of listening to Granny - he is eager to pass on his wizard's staff before he dies and assumes that Esk is going to be a boy. The Unseen University, wizarding school that is not actually located on the Discworld but has a few access points there, one of which is in Ankh Morpork. The Librarian He used to be human, but due to a magical incident during Rincewind's adventure, he was turned into an Orang-Utan and decided to stay an ape because that was easier (and he likes the bananas). It's the first book about the witch called Granny Weatherwax. She is, amongst other things, a midwife in the Ramptops (the area where she lives) and is therefore present during the birth of Esk when the dying wizard makes his fateful mistake. Since girls can't become wizards any more than boys can become witches, Granny Weatherwax wants to teach Esk witchery. She soon discovers however that it isn't enough - Esk's magic continues to burst forth and since Esk's staff is quite cheeky too, all Granny can do is get Esk to the Unseen University. There, naturally, there is even more ignorance and prejudice about girls and wizardry so a bit of headology (trickery to get people to do what you want without really using magic) is needed. At the university, the librarian seems the only one smart enough to see Esk and see her for what she is - and to be kind to her (granted, only after she gave him bananas but still). And then there is the magical incident, first in the library itself and then ... but you should discover that for yourself, it's quite bad-ass. I was quite surprised that there was so much world-building and we only got to Ankh Morpork and the UU so late in the book because that didn't leave much room for the final problem to arise and then get sorted out, but it turns out that is was just the right amount of everything, mixed together perfectly for the optimal outcome. Generally, the book is about gender roles and inequality. What I admire most of all is that Terry Pratchett never lay it on too thick. He was never preaching. On top of that, if we simplify the parties (men vs. women), both sides are almost equally ignorant. Sure, Granny makes allowances for Esk at some point, but she never stops having prejudiced opinions about everything. There is quite a lot of magic too (I particularly loved (view spoiler)[the duel between the Archchancellor and Granny (hide spoiler)] ), along with wonderful descriptions of the Discworld, Ankh Morpork, and the Unseen University including the library. Everything is just so quirky *thinks of the ad for the Guild of Thieves* and, as far as I know, unique. The previous two volumes had been fun but definitely weren't as funny as this one. I sat in the bookstore's café yesterday and burst out laughing on several occasions (like when Esk is REALLY dense about sex) and I also love how Pratchett seemlessly incorporates popculture references such as Steven Spielberg! The star, to me, was the staff at first. The fact that it can't speak and how Pratchett found a way to still give it so much character (even more than Luggage from the previous two volumes) is simply amazing! It didn't take long though for Granny to steal the spotlight even from the staff. Her dry sense of humour, her sharp observations of the world (despite being quite prejudiced against all manner of things), her goodness concealed by grumpiness make her my new favourite character (she might even surpass Death) - she often didn't even need words, actions or her famous stare were enough! Just look at some of the quotes I liked that showcase her verbal and behavioral badassery. :D Add to that the fact that the narrator of this audiobook, Celia Imrie, is a genius in giving each character here an individual voice, but being most perfect for Granny herself. In short, I can't wait to read more books with Granny (read by this narrator).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kai

    “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it's not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.” This was hilarious. I enjoyed every single page of it. If you saw me reading it, chances are high that you will have caught me cackling and giggling throughout most of the book. I never thought that I would pick up any Discworld novel but the more I read of them, the more I'm inclined to pick up another Pratchett book. They are light, fast-paced and highly entertaining. I skipped The Light Fantastic beca “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it's not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.” This was hilarious. I enjoyed every single page of it. If you saw me reading it, chances are high that you will have caught me cackling and giggling throughout most of the book. I never thought that I would pick up any Discworld novel but the more I read of them, the more I'm inclined to pick up another Pratchett book. They are light, fast-paced and highly entertaining. I skipped The Light Fantastic because a friend of mine recommended I read the Witches series first. He is quite the fan. I cannot wait to read Wyrd Sisters, the second instalment of the Witches series, next. I am also looking forward to reading Mort. Any more Discworld recommendations? Let me know! Find more of my books on Instagram

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    Similar in spirit to the first two books in the Discworld series, once again we have a delightful duo on a journey, encountering many a merry mishap on the way. This book is not as funny as its predecessors, though the plot seems more cohesive and a little less meandering. Despite the distinct lack of trolls, this is probably my favorite so far. I really enjoyed the "Girl Power" theme to the book. At least I think I did. It could just be those darned witches using their "headology" on me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This was a reread for me but it is years since my first read and I did not remember much of it! Loved that Death popped up right at the beginning and then Granny Weatherwax made her first appearance. Of course this book is vintage Discworld and these two, along with others, appear again and again later in the series and develop into much more rounded characters. Nevertheless Pratchett's humour is here in full force along with his wonderful descriptions and clever stories. These early books are li This was a reread for me but it is years since my first read and I did not remember much of it! Loved that Death popped up right at the beginning and then Granny Weatherwax made her first appearance. Of course this book is vintage Discworld and these two, along with others, appear again and again later in the series and develop into much more rounded characters. Nevertheless Pratchett's humour is here in full force along with his wonderful descriptions and clever stories. These early books are light reading - I polished this one off in a few hours -but they are still so good!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Murat S. Dural

    40'ın üzerinde kitaptan oluşan bir "Fantastik Seri" denilince "Diskdünya" bana okunması zor, birbirine bağlı, içine girdiğim zaman çıkamayacağım bir evrenmiş izlenimi vermişti. Bu önyargıdan sadece sondaki önerme, "içinden çıkamayacağım" kısmı gerçek oldu. Seve seve kaldığım bir diyar oldu. Fikrine çok güvendiğim dostlarım (Özellikle Ozancan Demirışık ve Hazal Çamur) bazı kitapların bağımsız olduğunu, istediğimden başlayabileceğimi, muhakkak okumam gerektiğini söylediğinde Terry Pratchett ile ta 40'ın üzerinde kitaptan oluşan bir "Fantastik Seri" denilince "Diskdünya" bana okunması zor, birbirine bağlı, içine girdiğim zaman çıkamayacağım bir evrenmiş izlenimi vermişti. Bu önyargıdan sadece sondaki önerme, "içinden çıkamayacağım" kısmı gerçek oldu. Seve seve kaldığım bir diyar oldu. Fikrine çok güvendiğim dostlarım (Özellikle Ozancan Demirışık ve Hazal Çamur) bazı kitapların bağımsız olduğunu, istediğimden başlayabileceğimi, muhakkak okumam gerektiğini söylediğinde Terry Pratchett ile tanışmak istedim. İlk olarak "Mort"u okudum ve hayran kaldım. İkinci kitabım "Faust / Eric" olmuştu. Çok daha zorlu bir kitaptı (kötü anlamda değil, daha derindi). "Eşit Haklar" ise yine ve yeniden "Mort" tadını verdi. Harika bir kitap. Terry Pratchett fantastiğe sarmaladığı günümüz ile, inanılmaz dili, akışkanlığı, espri anlayışı ile muazzam bir adam/yazar. Kitapları beni hem istediğim diyarlara götürürken hicvi, taşlamaları, göndermeleri ile gülmekten yerlere yatırıyor. Muhteşem bir hayal gücü. Bence muhakkak okunması gereken bir yazar. Ek ve faydalı olabileceğini düşündüğüm bir bilgi olarak; "Diskdünya" serisini hangi sırayla okumak gerektiğini merak ediyorsanız FRP.NET'in (Aynı zamanda Deli Dolu Yayınları'nın) çok güzel, bilgilendirici bir grafiği var. Oradan istediğiniz seriye (evet "Diskdünya'da başlamak için çoklu seçenekler mevcut) başlayabilirsiniz. Bulamazsanız, benimle iletişime geçerseniz size özelden bildirim yaparım. :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I'm fairly sure that this is only my second time reading this book since I first devoured the early books of the series back in the late 80s. Like The Light Fantastic it's forced a re-evaluation of my opinion of the early Discworld books and in a positive way. A dying wizard passes his staff to a destined wizard, the eighth son of an eighth son. Only he was a little careless and the eighth son is actually a daughter. Eskarina Smith grows into her magic young under the watchful eye of the witch Gr I'm fairly sure that this is only my second time reading this book since I first devoured the early books of the series back in the late 80s. Like The Light Fantastic it's forced a re-evaluation of my opinion of the early Discworld books and in a positive way. A dying wizard passes his staff to a destined wizard, the eighth son of an eighth son. Only he was a little careless and the eighth son is actually a daughter. Eskarina Smith grows into her magic young under the watchful eye of the witch Granny Weatherwax who tries to teach her witchery, but it becomes apparent that Esk's magic is of a different and potentially more dangerous type. Lacking other options Granny takes Esk to be admitted to the male-only Unseen University in the city of Ankh-Morpork and hijinks ensue. This is the Discworld's introduction to Granny Weatherwax, one of Pratchett's most beloved and enduring characters. She is much more fully realized as herself in this book than I had recalled, but some of her best characterization won't come until she gets Nanny Ogg to bounce off of in Wyrd Sisters in a few books time. The nine-year old Eskarina is pretty wonderful here as well, but I still have Tiffany Aching stuck in my head for contrast. Pratchett writing a nine year old in 2003 was a lot better than he was writing one in 1987, which is only to be expected. Mild spoiler regarding Esk: (view spoiler)[These two eventually meet in I Shall Wear Midnight, but as I recall, that's the only time we get to see Esk again. (hide spoiler)]

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: Not as funny or as quotable as The Light Fantastic, but very enjoyable for other reasons. Full Review I had to double check the year this was written. This book still feels very relevant today. Wizards can only be men. Witches can only be women. Their magic is different and shouldn't be mixed. A women has no place learning to be a wizard. Witches "have their place". Does any of this sound familiar? As someone who works in a field that is far too lacking in women the idea that ce Executive Summary: Not as funny or as quotable as The Light Fantastic, but very enjoyable for other reasons. Full Review I had to double check the year this was written. This book still feels very relevant today. Wizards can only be men. Witches can only be women. Their magic is different and shouldn't be mixed. A women has no place learning to be a wizard. Witches "have their place". Does any of this sound familiar? As someone who works in a field that is far too lacking in women the idea that certain disciplines are more suited for men or women is still a stigma we seem to be fighting today. That isn't to say this book is preachy or in your face about it. It simply that the satire is definitely more directed at real world issues than fantasy tropes like the first two books. It sounds like this sort of thing is more common in later books, so I find it interesting that he changed up the style so early on in the series. And while it wasn't quite as funny to me as The Light Fantastic, there were more than a few laugh out loud moments and quotes that I highlighted for later. Plus, Granny Weatherwax is a great character. I've read that she changes quite a bit in the Wyrd Sisters and beyond, but I'm glad I can see how she started out before I jump into that. Overall this book had to do something right, because I pretty much tore through it in a weekend, which despite it's short length is still rather fast for me. I already jumped right into Mort as Discworld seems to have its hooks into me right now.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    4.5 “...it is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done.” I started this book yesterday and found myself snatching any time I could to get back to it, even staying up late to finish it. This was a surprise. I'm always a little reluctant when starting what is branded as a funny book, worried that it wouldn't work on me, which is why I usually go for the audiobook version - the performance and intonations of the voice artists being invalu 4.5 “...it is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done.” I started this book yesterday and found myself snatching any time I could to get back to it, even staying up late to finish it. This was a surprise. I'm always a little reluctant when starting what is branded as a funny book, worried that it wouldn't work on me, which is why I usually go for the audiobook version - the performance and intonations of the voice artists being invaluable. Celia Imrie does an amazing job here, breathing life to Pratchett's words. Equal Rites follows Esk, who is bestowed wizard power (and a very stubborn staff) at birth by mistake, which creates a whole world of trouble because of course girls cannot be wizards. Or can they? We see her first steps in this magical world, helped by witch Granny Weatherwax, who literally steals the show with her legendary stare. She is a brilliant character, which I hear returns often in the Discworld books, with her strengths and weaknesses, and a very particular way of seeing the world. Yes, I'm totally joining her fan group. Pratchett delivers a great story that questions gender roles and inequality in a light and humouristic way, especially highlighting the ridicule, while throwing tons of clever play on words and cliches.

  13. 5 out of 5

    seak

    For some reason I thought I wouldn't like this book all that much. It's one of the first in the series, so for many people I talk to that's already a point against it, and I had it in my head that I will like other sets of characters better than the witches. So far, of the 3 discworld books I've now read, this was easily my favorite. Granny Weatherwax is amazing and I had some great fun with this book. I'm glad to hear this series only gets better (as it has already) and this is why I'm glad I'm For some reason I thought I wouldn't like this book all that much. It's one of the first in the series, so for many people I talk to that's already a point against it, and I had it in my head that I will like other sets of characters better than the witches. So far, of the 3 discworld books I've now read, this was easily my favorite. Granny Weatherwax is amazing and I had some great fun with this book. I'm glad to hear this series only gets better (as it has already) and this is why I'm glad I'm going through this series (ever so slowly) in publication order. I'm already enjoying the series and I have some high expectations for the rest. The story is straight-forward enough, but how it gets there was far from any of my expectations. Looking forward to more and more witches! 4 out of 5 Stars (Best so far)

  14. 5 out of 5

    BrokenTune

    "There are storms that are frankly theatrical, all sheet lightning and metallic thunder rolls. There are storms that are tropical and sultry, and incline to hot winds and fireballs. But this was a storm of the Circle Sea plains, and its main ambition was to hit the ground with as much rain as possible. It was the kind of storm that suggests that the whole sky has swallowed a diuretic. The thunder and lightning hung around in the background, supplying a sort of chorus, but the rain was the star o "There are storms that are frankly theatrical, all sheet lightning and metallic thunder rolls. There are storms that are tropical and sultry, and incline to hot winds and fireballs. But this was a storm of the Circle Sea plains, and its main ambition was to hit the ground with as much rain as possible. It was the kind of storm that suggests that the whole sky has swallowed a diuretic. The thunder and lightning hung around in the background, supplying a sort of chorus, but the rain was the star of the show. It tap-danced across the land." Equal Rites is not a perfect book. There were some gaps in the narrative of the story of Esk, the first female wizard of Discworld, which made me jump back to previous paragraphs only to find that there really was no explanation. Equal Rites was also a book of two halves: while the first half was a slow-paced introduction to the village of Bad Ass (yes, I love that name, too) and its inhabitants, the second half was full of racy action and adventure. However, while the book was not perfect, it had one aspect that made up for any points of criticism I might find: Granny Weatherwax. ‘Nonono, it’s against the lore, you must go away now. Ladies are not allowed in here!’ ‘I’m not a lady, I’m a witch,’ said Granny. Tough as nails... ‘Excuse me, my good woman, but would you be so kind as to move, please?’ Granny stepped aside, affronted by this display of downright politeness and particularly upset at being thought of as anyone’s good woman, and the driver saw Esk. Confident... Granny, meanwhile, was two streets away. She was also, by the standards of other people, lost. She would not see it like that. She knew where she was, it was just that everywhere else didn’t. Adventurous... ‘You don’t know anything about boats!’ Cutangle protested. ‘I shall have to learn quickly, then,’ replied Granny calmly. ‘But I haven’t been in a boat since I was a boy!’ ‘I wasn’t actually asking you to come. Does the pointy bit go in front?’ Cutangle moaned. Granny Weatherwax who has her own sense of style... Granny wasn’t sure she approved of silk, she’d heard it came out of a caterpillar’s bottom, but black velvet had a powerful attraction. and class.... Granny had the chance to become one of the very few women to learn what it really is that wizards wear under their robes, but modestly averted her eyes and followed the girl across the flagstones and down a wide flight of steps. even in the most, erm..., "romantic" of circumstances... ‘Mr Wizard.’ ‘Hallo?’ ‘When I said hold on—’ ‘Yes?’ ‘I didn’t mean there.’ There was a pause. ‘Oh. Yes. I see. I’m terribly sorry.’ ‘That’s all right.’ ‘My memory isn’t what it was . . . I assure you . . . no offence meant.’ ‘None taken.’ They flew in silence for a moment. ‘Nevertheless,’ said Granny thoughtfully, ‘I think that, on the whole, I would prefer you to move your hands.’ Granny is brilliant and not to be trifled with, but she has her soft sides, too, which just adds to her brilliance as a character. So, when her ward Esk is rejected by the wizards, she steps up to console her and take on the established guild like only Granny can... She stood up. ‘Let’s find this Great Hall then. No time to waste.’ ‘Um, women aren’t allowed in,’ said Esk. Granny stopped in the doorway. Her shoulders rose. She turned around very slowly. ‘What did you say?’ she said. ‘Did these old ears deceive me, and don’t say they did because they didn’t.’ ‘Sorry,’ said Esk. ‘Force of habit.’ ‘I can see you’ve been getting ideas below your station,’ said Granny coldly. ‘Go and find someone to watch over the lad, and let’s see what’s so great about this hall that I mustn’t set foot in it.’ Once Granny got going this was a brilliant read, but as I said, it took a while to get going.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Olga Godim

    A mediocre novel, at least for this writer. He’s still stretching his wings, and it shows: this earlier tale contains too much verbal clutter but almost no humor, which is abundant in his later novels. I like the idea of this one – a female should be allowed to be a wizard. Oh, yeah, I’m all for equal rights. I dislike the execution though. Why did the author make Esk, the protagonist, an 8-year-old girl? She is too young to behave the way she does and to know everything she is supposed to know. A mediocre novel, at least for this writer. He’s still stretching his wings, and it shows: this earlier tale contains too much verbal clutter but almost no humor, which is abundant in his later novels. I like the idea of this one – a female should be allowed to be a wizard. Oh, yeah, I’m all for equal rights. I dislike the execution though. Why did the author make Esk, the protagonist, an 8-year-old girl? She is too young to behave the way she does and to know everything she is supposed to know. She should’ve been at least 15. The book definitely targets adult readers, so such a young protagonist doesn’t make sense. On the other hand, Granny Weatherwax, the second protagonist and Esk’s mentor, is her usual grumpy and resourceful self, a champion of headology, which is a philosophy invented by Pratchett (I think). I like Granny’s lectures to Esk: “Listen,” said Granny. “If you give someone a bottle of red jollop for their wind it may work, right, but if you want it to work for sure then you let their mind make it work for them. Tell ’hem it’s moonbeams bottled in fairy wine or something. Mumble over it a bit…” Despite her formidable magical abilities, Granny uses headology most of the time, and it always works for her and her clients. She is one of the best literary witches of the genre, and the more I read about her the more I like her. Overall impression: for Pratchett’s purist – a necessary read. For the rest – you can skip it. There are much better books in the Discworld series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    “Everything was a different color in those days.” “That’s true.” “It didn’t rain so much in the summer time.” “The sunsets were redder.” “There were more old people. The world was full of them,” said the wizard. “Yes, I know. And now it’s full of young people." Boy ain't that the truth. Terry Pratchett is so very quotable. I enjoyed this introduction to Granny Weatherwax. I've "met" her in some of the later Discworld books, and she's a great character. This book looked at the issue of "women's job “Everything was a different color in those days.” “That’s true.” “It didn’t rain so much in the summer time.” “The sunsets were redder.” “There were more old people. The world was full of them,” said the wizard. “Yes, I know. And now it’s full of young people." Boy ain't that the truth. Terry Pratchett is so very quotable. I enjoyed this introduction to Granny Weatherwax. I've "met" her in some of the later Discworld books, and she's a great character. This book looked at the issue of "women's jobs" vs. "men's jobs". When I look around my more advanced math classes that are usually 99% male, it is easy to see how relevant this topic still is. “...it is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done.”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Fun reading This is book one of the Witches segment of Discworld. The characters are lively and likable. The magic system is comedic with a dark bite. Mixed into the slapstick silliness is a grain of philosophy and social commentary that is often highly quotable and thought provoking. The story reads like Wicca meets Harry Potter meets the theory of relativity meets The Dark Crystal. I found myself slowing down and rereading sections of the story to make sure I followed it correctly. A lot happens Fun reading This is book one of the Witches segment of Discworld. The characters are lively and likable. The magic system is comedic with a dark bite. Mixed into the slapstick silliness is a grain of philosophy and social commentary that is often highly quotable and thought provoking. The story reads like Wicca meets Harry Potter meets the theory of relativity meets The Dark Crystal. I found myself slowing down and rereading sections of the story to make sure I followed it correctly. A lot happens in a short period of time in this story, and at times I felt like I missed something. I read the first Rincewind prior to this, and had heard the Witches storyline was better. This is only the second discworld book I have read. I do like the Witches story slightly better, but Rincewind was good also. I plan to read both and work my way through this series. For years, I put off reading these because it didn't really seem like the type of story I would enjoy. I'm glad, because now I have them all ahead of me to read this summer. They make nice, comedic filler between my more serious reads.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Although the third Discworld book, it is fine to start the series here. The characters are all new. You only need to know that octarine, the eighth color of the rainbow, is the color of magic, and therefore the number 8 is also associated with magic. This isn’t one of my favorite Discworld stories so far, though. There’s a full story arc and good characters, and it is humorous, just not as funny as the others in the series, and it started to feel long even though it isn’t. I have a few favorite li Although the third Discworld book, it is fine to start the series here. The characters are all new. You only need to know that octarine, the eighth color of the rainbow, is the color of magic, and therefore the number 8 is also associated with magic. This isn’t one of my favorite Discworld stories so far, though. There’s a full story arc and good characters, and it is humorous, just not as funny as the others in the series, and it started to feel long even though it isn’t. I have a few favorite lines: It’s a fact known throughout the universes that no matter how carefully the colors are chosen, institutional decor ends up as either vomit green, unmentionable brown, nicotine yellow or surgical appliance pink. The lodgings were on the top floor next to the well-guarded premises of a respectable dealer in stolen property because, as Granny had heard, good fences make good neighbours. She was opposed to books on strict moral grounds, since she had heard that many of them were written by dead people and therefore it stood to reason reading them would be as bad as necromancy. … the blow a baby gets to introduce it to the world and give it a rough idea of what to expect from life.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Granny takes on the old boys club 4 August 2012 There are a few things that I have to say before commenting on this book as such. Firstly this is the second time that I read it, but I have listed it as a read book because when I read it the first time the friend who had lent it to me then proceeded to tell me all of the jokes. In fact, every Discworld novel that he ended up encouraging me to read generally came with a running commentary, and as such I ended up getting put off of them quite quickl Granny takes on the old boys club 4 August 2012 There are a few things that I have to say before commenting on this book as such. Firstly this is the second time that I read it, but I have listed it as a read book because when I read it the first time the friend who had lent it to me then proceeded to tell me all of the jokes. In fact, every Discworld novel that he ended up encouraging me to read generally came with a running commentary, and as such I ended up getting put off of them quite quickly. As it turned out, the funniest Discworld novel that I read was Guards Guards because that was the one novel that I read before he could spoil it for me. Secondly, I must say that I prefer the covers drawn by Paul Kirby as opposed to the other covers that I have looked at on the Goodreads site because his art seems to capture the essence of Discworld. I decided that instead of writing commentaries on the Discworld books that I read a while back that I would actually give Pratchett a chance by re-reading them and I must say that I am really glad that I did. His use of the English language is little short of masterful, which is not surprising since prior to becoming a full time author he was a journalist. While anybody who knows how to construct a proper sentence can write a story, it takes a lot of skill to write a story the way Pratchett does. Not only does he use puns in a way that actually make them funny (with the title being an example) but he is also able to use modern pop-culture to describe aspects of the Discworld in a way that actually does not make me cringe. While I do not believe that he is mixing metaphors, it is not exactly something that I have seem any fantasy writers really do. However not only does Pratchett do it and do it well, he also gets away with it. Now, this book is about how a young girl inherits, quite by accident, a wizard's staff, and in inheriting the staff she also inherits the wizard's magical ability. The catch is that on Discworld women are not supposed to be wizards. It is not that they can't be wizards, it is just that they are not supposed to be wizards (it is sort of like an old boy's club). It harkens back to the early twentieth century when women were not supposed to do a lot of things, not that they couldn't, but because the male dominated society said that they were not allowed. Obviously things had changed a lot by the time that Pratchett wrote this book, but in a way he showing us how the idea that women should not do a man's job is nothing short of absurd. However, I do suggest that things have gone a bit too much in the opposite direction, namely because some women are being allowed to work in areas simply because they are women, not because they are actually good at I. Please don't get me wrong, I am all in favour is gender equality and smashing open the old boys networks, it is just that I prefer appointments based on merit as opposed to gender. It is like the days when a noble would command an army, not because the noble could actually command an army (and in many cases they couldn't) but because they were a noble. The whole idea to me is absurd. I guess that is why Pratchett wrote this book. I have suggested that this was probably Pratchett's make or break book, namely because he had already completed the two part Colour of Magic and Light Fantastic, and here he appears to have pretty much dropped the original characters and started afresh with new characters: Granny Weatherwax and Esk (though Esk hasn't appeared any of the books since – or at least the ones that I have read). Granny will appear in other books down the track, but she in introduced here, with her powerful stare and her headology (the art of making people think something when it really is not the case). However it has been suggested to me that this story was not well received. Personally I cannot say but since he has written 32 novels, I guess this book did make him, though I also suspect that by the time we reach book 20 we find that only die hard Pratchett fans are buying his books (in the same way that die hard King fans buy Stephen King books). I still note that the odd Pratchett book or five seem to be commonplace on many a bookshelf. Finally I would suggest that Pratchett is not necessarily doing anything new, but rather taking an old style and putting it into a fantasy novel. His clever use of metaphors remind me of Douglas Adams (the Vogon Constructor fleet hung in the sky the way bricks don't) however from what I remember of Douglas Adams, his Hitch-hikers series seems to hit a brick wall at Life the Universe and Everything. Secondly, the story reminded me of the Asterix books, though instead of creating a comic he writes a story. However the way he writes the story, particularly when Esk meets the wolves in the forest, puts pictures of Asterix comics in my head.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This is book 3 (publication order) of the Discworld books and after having read and enjoyed both The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic last year I was quite looking forward to getting into some of the books which major fans of the series say are good. I can definitely say that this one is a lot better then The Colour of Magic in both writing style and ease of understanding. By this point it seems the Pratchett had really honed and perfected his tone of voice and writing style, just the rig This is book 3 (publication order) of the Discworld books and after having read and enjoyed both The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic last year I was quite looking forward to getting into some of the books which major fans of the series say are good. I can definitely say that this one is a lot better then The Colour of Magic in both writing style and ease of understanding. By this point it seems the Pratchett had really honed and perfected his tone of voice and writing style, just the right amount of sark-y meets funny meets thoughtful. This is book 1 of the Witches series (which is a series within the overall Discworld series) and it's a wonderfully fun beginning to what no doubt promises to be a fun journey. We get to meet Granny Weatherwax who is a Witch and is firmly set in her ways and ideas, at least until something comes along to throw a spanner right in the works - Esk. Granny is a great character with a lot of charm which more than makes up for her abrupt and somewhat dismissive attitude. She's the sort of person I think everyone has maybe met in real life before, she likes to believe she's right and she loves to be respected. Whenever she's wrong, she's not actually wrong, there must be some error along the way. She's also very proficient as a witch unlike some others we encounter in the book. Overall she's a pretty likeable and slightly intimidating character. The other main character we meet is actually the one that the story really revolves around. Her name is Esk and she is the 8th son of an 8th son (but she's not... she's a girl). When a wizard comes looking for the 8th son of an 8th son in order to pass on his magic and staff he doesn't quite realise the mistake he's made until he's long gone and the wizard magic lies dormant within Esk. Esk is a young child, aged 8 when the story really begins, and she is a very inquisitive and actually very bright young child. She likes to think that she knows a lot, but she's always ready to learn more and she definitely does so through the story. I found her to be instantly fun to read about, and her story just got better as it went. One element I absolutely adore from Pratchett is his ability to make heavy or thoughtful topics a central theme or part of the book without it bringing down the tone in any way. When you read his books it always feels easy and fun, and there's never a dull moment of a lull in the writing because it's written to be a bonkers world that will entertain you. It's a fabulous concept and I have to say nothing makes me happier than knowing that I still have over 35+ books left in the series. I can't wait! A solid 4*s - really readable and fun, and highly recommended!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Mediocre, but not bad. I can definitely understand why others like Pratchett's writing so much. I'm coming to terms with the fact that I'm not a Discworld fan. I just don't appreciate Pratchett's humour as much as I would like to. Or maybe I don't like that humour takes the centre stage in his novels and I prefer a good story. Pratchett's world is charming but not for me. After 4 novels, I'm giving up on the series.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anushree

    This was <3 The town's name is Bad Ass. The University's name is Unseen University. Esk has so much spunk. Granny Weatherwax makes me laugh and proud at the same time. I loved this sheer joy of a book. Looking forward to reading the entire Discworld series over a period. <3

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tfitoby

    A brave move from Terry Pratchett as he moves away from his established characters and takes a shot at world building. I've been listening to the audiobook for the reread of this one as part of my exercise regime and it was quite the good distraction from the pain. The third in the now long running Discworld series moves away from Rincewind, The Luggage, Twoflower and the parodies of generic sword and magic fantasy epics. After the success of the first two I imagine this must have been a brave mov A brave move from Terry Pratchett as he moves away from his established characters and takes a shot at world building. I've been listening to the audiobook for the reread of this one as part of my exercise regime and it was quite the good distraction from the pain. The third in the now long running Discworld series moves away from Rincewind, The Luggage, Twoflower and the parodies of generic sword and magic fantasy epics. After the success of the first two I imagine this must have been a brave move for a young author. Seems to have paid off for him in the long run. I can only review from the point of view of having read all of the series at least but I believe as a standalone novel this one was good fun. Looking at it as a building block for what was to come it rates highly too but there are too many discrepencies in the rules of his world and his characters for me to love it in retrospect. Esk is a girl, she's destined to become the first female wizard after a mix up with checking the sex of a baby and a dying wizards last wish. But first she must overcome the ingrained magical misogyny that has become second nature on the Disc. For this she acquires the aid of Granny Weatherwax and embarks on a quest to change the world. In true early Pratchett style silliness abounds, humourous asides are plenty and a start is made on intelligently unravelling human foibles and frailties that would later become his hallmark. If you're reading these for the first time in order you won't notice everything that I had a problem with - Granny Weatherwax isn't as she would later come to be known, she is merely a tool of the author for example, so I'm sure you will enjoy this a lot more than I did this time around because a novice Pratchett is still heads and shoulders above almost everybody else. Next up is Mort, my first ever Discworld read and I'm quite excited at the prospect of running 5km to it. (Mental groan.) My reread of the Discworld can be followed in the following places: The Colour of Magic The Light Fantastic

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mangrii

    Tercera novela de Mundodisco y la primera de la saga de las Brujas. En esta ocasión un mago moribundo cede su cayado mágico a un bebe recién nacido, Eskarina Herrero, una octava hija de una octavo hijo. El problema es que la magia de magos solo pasa de magos a niños; y las niñas en cambio solamente pueden ser brujas, ya que su magia es totalmente distinta. A pesar de sus peros, la bruja Yaya Ceravieja decide velar por Esk, ayudarla a convertirse en bruja y también en mago; llevándola hasta la Un Tercera novela de Mundodisco y la primera de la saga de las Brujas. En esta ocasión un mago moribundo cede su cayado mágico a un bebe recién nacido, Eskarina Herrero, una octava hija de una octavo hijo. El problema es que la magia de magos solo pasa de magos a niños; y las niñas en cambio solamente pueden ser brujas, ya que su magia es totalmente distinta. A pesar de sus peros, la bruja Yaya Ceravieja decide velar por Esk, ayudarla a convertirse en bruja y también en mago; llevándola hasta la Universidad Invisible para completar su formación. Como siempre ha sido un relato ameno, ligero, cortito, con sus aventuras absurdas y diálogos desternillantes. Pero esta vez me ha gustado más, ha sido un relato que no se ha ido tanto por las ramas y que deja una crítica social a la orden del día, el machismo. Sin perder el sentido del humor, nos presenta el símil de que solo se puede ser mago o bruja según tu género con el mundo laboral de la actualidad. Los personajes son geniales, sobre todo los dos principales. La pequeña Esk me gusta cómo va cambiando y evolucionando, pero es que Yaya Ceravieja se come las paginas, cada dialogo de ella yo no podía parar de reírme, es un personaje único que le da vida a esta novela. Además. Creo que de Yaya tendremos más aventuras a lo largo de la saga, pero que de Esk hasta la saga de Tiffany Dolorido no tendremos ninguna noticia. Que ganas tengo de continuar con la saga de Las brujas, siempre me pasa que termino cada libro, próxima parada, la maravillosa Mort.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marta Álvarez

    Como me viene pasando siempre con las novelas de Pratchett, esta es una historia que se disfruta muchísimo ya no tanto por la trama sino por la ambientación única y el estilo divertidísimo e inigualable del autor. Por algo será que, de julio a ahora, he pasado de no haber leído ninguna novela suya a haber leído cuatro. En Mundodisco, Pratchett se salta todas las reglas de la coherencia narrativa; hace lo que le da la gana... y le sale bien. Pues chapó. En concreto, de ritos iguales me llevo unas Como me viene pasando siempre con las novelas de Pratchett, esta es una historia que se disfruta muchísimo ya no tanto por la trama sino por la ambientación única y el estilo divertidísimo e inigualable del autor. Por algo será que, de julio a ahora, he pasado de no haber leído ninguna novela suya a haber leído cuatro. En Mundodisco, Pratchett se salta todas las reglas de la coherencia narrativa; hace lo que le da la gana... y le sale bien. Pues chapó. En concreto, de ritos iguales me llevo unas protagonistas entrañables y divertidas, y algunos conceptos de lo más interesantes, más allá de la comedia con la que están casi maquillados. Sí, «cabezología», y tal.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    My first venture into Witches series and I don't know why it took me so long. Although this book isn't on par with my favourite Discworld books (Small gods, Jingo, Hogfather, Interesting times ) it has all the charm, humor and cynicism of a proper Discworld novel. Eskarina is great character but Granny Whetherwax wasn't nowhere nearly as interesting. Anyway, I am eagerly continuing the series and I plan to do with Witches what I haven't done with any other Discworld series. Read it in order.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe

    December 10, 2009 The first female wizard is exceptional, of course. It was never meant to be. Hahahahahahaha. *** November 9, 2011 Veronica's been feeling a little under the weather this week, and when that is the case, she likes me to read aloud. And she couldn't locate the book we had been reading, so she decided on Pratchett instead. They both seem to like it so far. *** June 28, 2014 The thing I really noticed this time is the way Pratchett makes up for his earlier omission of women at Unseen Univ December 10, 2009 The first female wizard is exceptional, of course. It was never meant to be. Hahahahahahaha. *** November 9, 2011 Veronica's been feeling a little under the weather this week, and when that is the case, she likes me to read aloud. And she couldn't locate the book we had been reading, so she decided on Pratchett instead. They both seem to like it so far. *** June 28, 2014 The thing I really noticed this time is the way Pratchett makes up for his earlier omission of women at Unseen University by acknowledging how many it takes to keep the university running. And I continue to love how Granny Weatherwax supports herself in Anhk-Morpork and how she gets around the wizards. That Esk is nine doesn't surprise me: she's definitely a predecessor of Tiffany in the competence department. I'd really love to see Esk again, more grown-up, more used to being a first and only. personal copy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Narey (Bookreview- aholic)

    Published: 13/09/2005 (first published 1987) Author: Terry Pratchett Recommended for: fan's of fantasy novels First of all I love Terry Pratchett books, alothough this book was incredibly well written by one of the most talented fantasy writers, it isn't my favourite one in the 'Discworld' series. This book features Granny Weatherwax, The Librarian, and Eskarina Smith. Eskarina was born a wizard even though it is very very rare for there to be a female wizard, Eskarina wants to become one and with Published: 13/09/2005 (first published 1987) Author: Terry Pratchett Recommended for: fan's of fantasy novels First of all I love Terry Pratchett books, alothough this book was incredibly well written by one of the most talented fantasy writers, it isn't my favourite one in the 'Discworld' series. This book features Granny Weatherwax, The Librarian, and Eskarina Smith. Eskarina was born a wizard even though it is very very rare for there to be a female wizard, Eskarina wants to become one and with everything possible in her way to stop her, her determination keeps her going. It is set in Bad Ass where we start the adventure. The characters are very well described and the writing style of Terry Pratchett makes it easy for the readers imagination to be let loose in the amazing and wonderful world that he has created. Even though it isn't my favourite book it is still a really brilliant read and perfect for fan's of Terry Pratchett.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    2.5 stars. A disappointment after really enjoying The Color of Magic and The Light Fantastic. I love the Discworld setting and will certainly read more in the series, but I did not love this installment.

  30. 4 out of 5

    ❀⊱Rory⊰❀

    I loved this book! And I've read a lot of Magical-Person-Comes-Of-Age books. Funny, touching, original, this one has it all. If you haven't read it, get thee to the library!

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