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H.P. Lovecraft's Book of Horror

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Written by one of the most important writers of the twentieth century, Lovecraft's 1927 essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature" traces the evolution of the genre from the early Gothic novels through to the work of contemporary American and British authors. Throughout Lovecraft acknowledges those writers and stories that are the very finest that the horror field has to of Written by one of the most important writers of the twentieth century, Lovecraft's 1927 essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature" traces the evolution of the genre from the early Gothic novels through to the work of contemporary American and British authors. Throughout Lovecraft acknowledges those writers and stories that are the very finest that the horror field has to offer: Edgar Allen Poe, Henry James, Rudyard Kipling, Bram Stoker, Robert Louis Stevenson, Guy de Maupassant, and Arthur Conan Doyle, among others. This chilling new collection also contains Henry James' wonderfully atmospheric short novel The Turn of the Screw. Stephen Jones is the winner of three World Fantasy Awards, three Bram Stoker Awards, three International Horror Guild Award, and a fifteen-time recipient of the British Fantasy Award. He lives in London.


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Written by one of the most important writers of the twentieth century, Lovecraft's 1927 essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature" traces the evolution of the genre from the early Gothic novels through to the work of contemporary American and British authors. Throughout Lovecraft acknowledges those writers and stories that are the very finest that the horror field has to of Written by one of the most important writers of the twentieth century, Lovecraft's 1927 essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature" traces the evolution of the genre from the early Gothic novels through to the work of contemporary American and British authors. Throughout Lovecraft acknowledges those writers and stories that are the very finest that the horror field has to offer: Edgar Allen Poe, Henry James, Rudyard Kipling, Bram Stoker, Robert Louis Stevenson, Guy de Maupassant, and Arthur Conan Doyle, among others. This chilling new collection also contains Henry James' wonderfully atmospheric short novel The Turn of the Screw. Stephen Jones is the winner of three World Fantasy Awards, three Bram Stoker Awards, three International Horror Guild Award, and a fifteen-time recipient of the British Fantasy Award. He lives in London.

30 review for H.P. Lovecraft's Book of Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Lucia

    Really enjoyed this. An excellent cross section of classic horror stories, plus Lovecraft's Supernatural in Literature to boot. Definitely a must-read for those looking to dig into the genre's roots.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard Behrens

    This is a must for all Lovecraft fans. In 1925, one of Lovecraft's friends was publishing his own horror magazine and asked H.P. to write an essay about supernatural weird fiction. What he got was a masterpiece, a comprehensive history of everything that Lovecraft knew about weird literature called "Supernatural Horror in Literature." This long, long essay is a veritable university course in literary history, targeting all the horror, supernatural, weird, ghost, horror and gothic short story wri This is a must for all Lovecraft fans. In 1925, one of Lovecraft's friends was publishing his own horror magazine and asked H.P. to write an essay about supernatural weird fiction. What he got was a masterpiece, a comprehensive history of everything that Lovecraft knew about weird literature called "Supernatural Horror in Literature." This long, long essay is a veritable university course in literary history, targeting all the horror, supernatural, weird, ghost, horror and gothic short story writers and novelists that defined the genre. The magazine that hosted the essay folded after one issue, but what an issue! This book, edited by Stephen Jones, which starts with Lovecraft's essay, is a collection of short stories and novellas which Lovecraft cites in his essay, including such authors as Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, Robert W. Chambers, Ambrose Bierce, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Machen, M.R. James, Clark Ashton Smith, Guy de Maupassant and many others. It is a priceless collection of the stories that Lovecraft himself enjoyed. Almost all these stories, including Lovecraft's essay, is available on-line for free, but having a real book that smells of old bookcases and whose spine creaks when I open it is a perfect way to experience it's treasures.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Only for the ill-at-mind

  4. 4 out of 5

    Harris

    First off, what’s with that ridiculous cover? That buggy eyed green walrus man, er, Cthulhu, totally looks like some schlubby guy in a rubber suit! Not really the best image to set up an eerie atmosphere. Anyway, this Barnes and Noble edition reprints H.P. Lovecraft’s long essay, Supernatural Horror in Literature, and then anthologizes some of the stories praised by Lovecraft in this piece. While glimpses of Lovecraft’s tastes and philosophies of horror writing is showcased in the piece, it can First off, what’s with that ridiculous cover? That buggy eyed green walrus man, er, Cthulhu, totally looks like some schlubby guy in a rubber suit! Not really the best image to set up an eerie atmosphere. Anyway, this Barnes and Noble edition reprints H.P. Lovecraft’s long essay, Supernatural Horror in Literature, and then anthologizes some of the stories praised by Lovecraft in this piece. While glimpses of Lovecraft’s tastes and philosophies of horror writing is showcased in the piece, it can be a little dry and rambling. From its roots in ancient folklore, Lovecraft traces the development of supernatural horror to his time, and shares some writers that he felt exemplify the genre, including their strengths and flaws. While an important piece of literary criticism in the history of the horror and weird tale genre, expressing the state and styles of the form, it is rather dated both in its critiques and the authors included. This is particularly the case in the way that Lovecraft himself revolutionized and influenced the path of the genre throughout the rest of the twentieth century. Still, the essay is a good overview of the genre through the lens of Lovecraft’s own take on it. The stories themselves do provide a good sampling of works Lovecraft found inspiring, ranging from classics in the genre from Poe, Bierce, and James, (including some rarer and more obscure works like Benson’s “Negotium Perambulans” and Mary E. Wilkins-Freeman’s “The Shadows on the Wall”) to a few lesser pieces (in particular Edward Lucas White’s “Lukundoo” and Kipling’s “Mark of the Beast”), tawdry in their reliance on hoary period racism in their plots. Still, there’s quite a few interesting, little known stories collected here.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    Another anthology of tales Lovecraft highlighted in his Supernatural Horror in Literature essay. This is enough of a different selection that it is definitely worth owning also, if that's what you're into. And I am. A bonus is that it has Lovecraft's entire essay as the first item in the book so you can read the whole thing for yourself before you begin the stories.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Garrett jr

    An interesting collection of short stories. This book was originally purchased for me when I was a child and it was too advanced to read. I was interested into getting in H.P. Lovecraft’s works only to find that all he wrote in this was the beginning essay telling about supernatural horror. If you want to read a collection of different, yet well written and some obscure stories and authors, give this a read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I used to really like Stephen Jones, but he's lost his way in recent years, picking stories only from his circle of friends. This is an attempt to banish that tag... but publishing a collection of out of copyright stories claiming inspiration to Lovecraft. The stories are ok, but the attempt to get the reader to shell out money in this way is pretty grim.

  8. 5 out of 5

    John Frasene

    Like any collection of short stories there is a range of quality, but fans of HP Lovecraft should read this for "The Yellow Sign", "The Great God Pan", "The Spider", and "The Mark of the Beast". And of course "The Fall of the House of Usher" is a masterpiece.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jay Rothermel

    A cheap trade paper back printed on quickly yellowing pages. All the tales are free online nowadays.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    I've been reading this collection for more than 10 years now and finally decided to finish it. The last part of it that I read was Lovecraft's "Supernatural Horror in Literature" essay. It wasn't terrible but was mostly just plots of stories and novels told in short form with a bit of comment on each. Of the 20 or so stories my favorites were: Poe's -The Fall of the House of Usher-, Clark Ashton Smith's - The Double Shadow-, Marion F. Crawford's -The Upper Berth- and Irvin Cobb's -Fishhead-. But I I've been reading this collection for more than 10 years now and finally decided to finish it. The last part of it that I read was Lovecraft's "Supernatural Horror in Literature" essay. It wasn't terrible but was mostly just plots of stories and novels told in short form with a bit of comment on each. Of the 20 or so stories my favorites were: Poe's -The Fall of the House of Usher-, Clark Ashton Smith's - The Double Shadow-, Marion F. Crawford's -The Upper Berth- and Irvin Cobb's -Fishhead-. But I didn't give any of the stories less than a 5 out of 10.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David Breedlove

    This book is filled with gripping and chilling short stories of horror. I was almost afraid to read the next word. I read like I was tip-toeing down a dark hallway, trying not to wake some sort of evilness. These stories will drudge up emotions in you that you didn't know you had. Before each story there are analysis of the story and author. This is not only a collection of horror stories but a collection of history of the influx of great writers in the late 19th century.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe **** I read the House of Usher almost every year and I find something new every time. There is really great criticism about the vampiric relationship between the Usher siblings. Everyone should read this at least once. The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce *** I really like Bierce's writing. I felt this story could have used a bit more build-up of Morgan's paranoia. All-in-all it had an interesting premise.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Madkropotkin

    I enjoyed this collection. You can definitely how these authors influenced Lovecraft's writing. There are stories where you could swear you were reading one of his. I really liked "The Foot of the Mummy" and "The Great God Pan" the best. I learned three very important things from this book. 1. I need to learn more Latin. 2. I really like Gautier, Kipling, Machen and James. and 3. Horror stories can be great pieces of literature.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    21 horror stories written in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Authors include Dickens, Louis Stevenson, Gautier, De Maupassant, Poe, Bierce, Chambers, Kipling, Walpole and others. A diverse selection of style, narrative voice and structure within the genre are presented in this selection. Those interested in writing horror fiction should read this book to develop an ear for the genre.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This was a really fun read. I skipped the essay at the beginning, since I decided I'd rather read the stories than read about them. Some of the stories weren't great but they're all interesting to see how Lovecraft built his literary cannon.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Meyer

    The stories contained in the book are from a variety of authors in the genre chosen by Lovecraft. Some of the stories struck me as well written but there were some which I found rather boring. But with the variety provided I am sure that there will be something for every horror fan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid Foster

    I was reading this book off and on, some stories are good but with others the writing and/or story is too dated for me to enjoy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bingham

    Fabulous stories!! The selection was amazing...I loved them all...spanning all times and ages and countries...the book was a great read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Hunter

    HPL's essay "Supernatural Horror in Literature" and a selection of short stories mentioned therein.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Norwood

    same review as the girl who threw butterflies

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    A nice collection of many of the stories featured in HPL's "Supernatural Horror in Literature" essay. Nice to have them in one place.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Moore

    I like anything Lovecraft, so I liked this!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    Anthology,Horror

  24. 4 out of 5

    Synchro

    A great collection of stories by authors who influenced Lovecraft growing up as a child. Great stuff that sent me seeking out writers I might easily have missed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robby

    The best part of this collection is the witty series of introductory notes by H.P. himself, to each story. Rarely praising, more often chastising/criticizing the authors. Such a humble man :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Stcroix

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ian Crosby

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fabio Alberto

  29. 4 out of 5

    Travis Smith

  30. 4 out of 5

    Magnus Xe

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