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The Education of Little Tree PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Education of Little Tree
Author: Forrest Carter
Publisher: Published August 31st 2001 by University of New Mexico Press (first published 1976)
ISBN: 9780826328090
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The Education of Little Tree tells of a boy orphaned very young, who is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. Little Tree as his grandparents call him is shown how to hunt and survive in the mountains, to respect nature in the Cherokee Way, taking only what is needed, leaving The Education of Little Tree tells of a boy orphaned very young, who is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. Little Tree as his grandparents call him is shown how to hunt and survive in the mountains, to respect nature in the Cherokee Way, taking only what is needed, leaving the rest for nature to run its course. Little Tree also learns the often callous ways of white businessmen and tax collectors, and how Granpa, in hilarious vignettes, scares them away from his illegal attempts to enter the cash economy. Granma teaches Little Tree the joys of reading and education. But when Little Tree is taken away by whites for schooling, we learn of the cruelty meted out to Indian children in an attempt to assimilate them and of Little Tree's perception of the Anglo world and how it differs from the Cherokee Way. A classic of its era, and an enduring book for all ages, The Education of Little Tree has now been redesigned for this twenty-fifth anniversary edition.

30 review for The Education of Little Tree

  1. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    The closest this book gets to touching nature is the sweet sappiness of the story. Though the author put the story forward as true, he was not actually a Native, but a racist con-man who fought to keep segregation and was a member of the KKK. But this revelation shouldn't be that surprising, since the book is hardly insightful or sensitive in its views. Carter's characters are old, romanticized cliches of the colonial 'Noble Savage'--poor Indians beset by the white man's greed trying to eke a pe The closest this book gets to touching nature is the sweet sappiness of the story. Though the author put the story forward as true, he was not actually a Native, but a racist con-man who fought to keep segregation and was a member of the KKK. But this revelation shouldn't be that surprising, since the book is hardly insightful or sensitive in its views. Carter's characters are old, romanticized cliches of the colonial 'Noble Savage'--poor Indians beset by the white man's greed trying to eke a peaceful and natural existence out in the wild of nature. It should remind us all that an overly rosy view can be just as racist and condescending as a negative one. Carter is just another in a long line of people who tried to make themselves more mysterious and interesting by making up a distant Native ancestor and then claiming it gives them some kind of spiritual and moral superiority. I guess I should mention here that it's overtly racist to imagine that a fully-formed culture can be propagated through blood, as if Native peoples were magic elves. But people like to individualize themselves, and if that means they have to create a culture from whole cloth to belong to, that isn't going to stop them, whether it's someone bringing up their '1/16th Cherokee blood' or a Wiccan who doesn't realize they're following Christian mysticism, conspiracy theories, and some stuff that was made up by delusionals and con-men. And if that wasn't enough to tip us off, there's also a lengthy sambo slapstick scene almost as insulting to blacks as Martin Lawrence in a fatsuit. It just goes to show that it's easy to fool people with over-the-top cliches and over-romanticized characters. Even Oprah was taken in, featuring this book in her reading club--but perhaps it shouldn't surprise us that one purveyor of ill-informed saccharine melodrama should be taken in by another. In the end, we get a sort of literary version of the blackface minstrel show, depicting Native life with a quaint nostalgia that has nothing to do with the real experience of Natives or their history. Instead, everything is boiled down into a simple little story--almost a fable--of how the colonial mindset would prefer to see Natives: as fundamentally separate in vague, mystical ways. They are so oversimplified (as heroes or villains) that they no longer resemble real people; instead, they are reduced to a subspecies of man defined by a set of universally shared traits. Their identity is primarily communal, primarily traditional, incapable of change, learning, or individuality. It's hard for me to think of a more pointed definition or racism than 'assuming that a group of people, similar in appearance and ancestry, all share a series of invariable traits which make them fundamentally and inescapably different from every other individual and people group'. Like 'The Kite Runner', this is just another book that assuages white guilt by making white readers feel that, in just picking up a book, they have become worldly, understanding, and compassionate--despite the fact that neither book really reveals the culture it set out to depict, and could not provide any real insight to anyone who was in the least familiar with how those cultures actually work.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Within the first three pages I fell in love with our four year old narrator, whose grandfather called Little Tree. His relationships with his grandparents reminded me so much of mine, it was hard not to identify with that even though his Cherokee culture was of course different. Still, the love, the knowledge, the ways shown to live were in many ways, different but the same. So Little Tree learns from his grandparents the way of the Indian and how to navigate the world of the white man. Loved wa Within the first three pages I fell in love with our four year old narrator, whose grandfather called Little Tree. His relationships with his grandparents reminded me so much of mine, it was hard not to identify with that even though his Cherokee culture was of course different. Still, the love, the knowledge, the ways shown to live were in many ways, different but the same. So Little Tree learns from his grandparents the way of the Indian and how to navigate the world of the white man. Loved watching him learn, change and grow. Of course there is sadness, the white world trying to encroach on the Indian ways, but also he knows he is loved. I knew nothing about this author when I read this book. Only after reading and reading other reviews did I learn about this author's shaded and terrible past. So does one judge this book by its author? I usually think that learning about an author often adds nuances to their books, that are usually passed over. Since an author puts his heart and soul into their stories, there is always something there identifiably the authors own, whether opinions, or memories. So...... Can people change? Going by this book I can't believe the same man who wrote this book was the same man as that of his earlier years. So I was conflicted and decided to judge this book on its own merits rather than judging the authors life. Others may not feel so but that is up to them. I enjoyed this book, enjoyed the story so that is how I will rate it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lawyer

    The Education of Little Tree: Which is Right The Education of Little Tree by Forrest Carter was chosen as the Pre-1980 Group Read by members of On the Southern Literary Trail for June, 2016. Special thanks to Trail Member Tina for nominating this work. The Education of Little Tree, First Edition, Delacorte Press, New York, New York, 1976 Forrest Carter, 1975 This is my third read of this book. It means much to me. For it speaks of the love shared by a young boy and his grandparents. Orphan The Education of Little Tree: Which is Right The Education of Little Tree by Forrest Carter was chosen as the Pre-1980 Group Read by members of On the Southern Literary Trail for June, 2016. Special thanks to Trail Member Tina for nominating this work. The Education of Little Tree, First Edition, Delacorte Press, New York, New York, 1976 Forrest Carter, 1975 This is my third read of this book. It means much to me. For it speaks of the love shared by a young boy and his grandparents. Orphaned at five, Little Tree, a Cherokee Indian, is taken into the home of Granma and Granpa. My Mother married young. On a dare, no less. Crossing the Mississippi state line where it was possible to marry at a younger age without parental consent. My father decided he was much too young to be one, though I guess he enjoyed making me. When he abandoned my mother and me I was a week old. We were taken in by my mother's parents. I was raised in my Grandparents' home. My Mother completed her growing up in that home. Although I came to excel academically throughout my years in school, without doubt, my most valuable education did not come from text books but my Grandparents, especially my Grandfather, who was always Papa to me. I recognize much of this book as the truth. It is a beautiful and wondrous truth. I share much in common with Little Tree. The lessons he was taught by his Grandparents are tenets for a more full and complete life. Living in harmony with the environment. Take only what you need. To take more is only greed. Tolerance for those different than us. Living simply, recognizing the difference between needs and wants. Accepting your self worth, though you may be looked down upon by others who consider themselves higher than you by their perception of social stature, the value of the roots of the history of your people or family. The acceptance of the passing of all things. This is the nature of life. Embrace these truths and live fully, or live in anxiety and stuggle in futility. Live in despair and desparation. I was taught these same truths. When this little book was first published, it attracted little attention, little acclaim, no fanfare. It was not until the University of New Mexico issued a paperback edition of the book in 1980 that The Education of Little Tree became a publishing phenomenon. The book was introduced by a Cherokee Native American whose ancestors had been moved from their homes during the infamous Trail of Tears. Forrest Carter had written the book as his autobiographical memoir. He billed himself as a Storyteller to the Cherokee Nation. It is frequently on the reading curriculum of many high schools. Copies have sold in the millions. Who is Forrest Carter? In 1975 a darkly tanned man with a mustache walked into an Abilene, Texas, bookstore owned by Chuck and Betty Weeth. He introduced himself as Forrest Carter. He had written his first book, Gone to Texas under the name Benjamin Franklin Carter. That book was reprinted under the title The Outlaw Josey Wales under the name Forrest Carter. Clint Eastwood bought the film rights. Carter was doing well. He became an Abilene, Texas, fixture and was a regular dinner guest at the Shipps. It was there Carter began telling his story of being raised as a Cherokee orphan by his grandparents in Tennessee and he was writing his biography. But Forrest Carter had a past. He wasn't a Cherokee. He wasn't from Tennessee. He was Asa Carter, born in 1925 in Anniston, Alabama. During the 1950s he was a member of the Ku Klux Klan and founder of a white supremacy group. He formed a splinter group of the KKK which was responsible for an attack on Nat King Cole at a concert in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1956. Carter worked at Birmingham radio station WILD where he broadcast right wing programs supporting anti-semitism and blatant segregation. Asa Carter, Speech Writer Carter became a speech writer for Governor George Wallace in the 1960s, penning the vitriolic first Inauguration Speech containing the infamous line, "Segregation now, segregation forever." Carter continued to work through the administration of Governor Lurleen Wallace, who ran in her husband's stead when he could not run for a successive third term. However, Carter and George Wallace had a parting of the ways. When Wallace ran for a third term as Governor in 1970 and was elected again, Wallace pushed Carter to the side. Wallace had toned down his segregationist rhetoric. He saw Carter as an extremist. Wallace had no more use for him. On the day of Wallace's third Inauguration, Alabama journalist and author Wayne Greenhaw found Carter behind the State Capital crying. Carter told Greenhaw Wallace had sold out Alabama to the liberals. It was the last time Greenhaw ever saw Carter in person. But Greenhaw did see a televised interview between a man who called himself Forrest Carter and Barbara Walters on The Today Show in 1976 talking about his "Autobiography," The Education of Little Tree. Greenhaw recognized the voice and began asking questions of Asa Carter's old associates. Greenhaw got a phone call from Carter. "You wouldn't want to hurt old Forrest, would you?" Greenhaw retorted it was all a lie. And he would prove it. Carter hung up. And disappeared once more. Forrest Carter was Asa Carter. He died June 7, 1979, of heart failure in Abilene, Texas. He was at work on The Wonderings of Little Tree which was unfinished. He is buried in Anniston, Alabama. Should This Book Be Read? This book has been subject to much criticism, most of it based on the personal and political life of Asa Carter. Is this the proper basis for judging a work of literature? I say it is not. Whatever Asa Carter's actual political beliefs were at one time does not mean he still possessed those beliefs at the time he wrote The Education of Little Tree. His relationship with the Shipps in Abilene, Texas, indicate a completely different person than the man who worked for George Wallace. His editor at Delacorte Press, Eleanor Friede, and her husband were Jewish. He was a frequent guest in their home. Carter never uttered a word of intolerance in their presence. The Education of Little Tree is a work about love and tolerance. The racists in this book are wealthy whites, bureaucrats, politicians, and intolerant preachers. Perhaps Carter portrayed that so well because he knew what it was to hate. Native Americans and blacks are respectfully and sympathetically portrayed. For Asa Carter's previous anti-semitic assertions in earlier years, the kindest person in this work aside from Little Tree's Grandparents, is Mr. Wine. A Jew. To refuse to read this book because of Asa Carter's previous political life is a form of censorship. I do not believe in censorship in any form. Nor the banning of books. There is far too much of that as it is. Do not think I write an apologia for Asa Carter. I detest what he once stood for. However, I am ever mindful of the resilience of human beings and their ability to change. Hatred is a heavy burden to bear. If not exorcised it will destroy the one who carries it. Perhaps Carter wrote this as his penance. I believe in the possibility of redemption. As Little Tree would say, "Which is right." EXTRAS Act One. Seeing the Forrest Through the Little Trees. A Transcript from This American Life concerning Forrest/ Asa Carter and The Education of Little Tree

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leah Higginbotham

    *Note: there is a lot of controversy and here say about the author of this book. Forget about it and enjoy this book with an innocent mind! The Education of Little Tree follows a young boy as he follows his Grandpa, learning and loving as he goes. From plowing to whiskey making, it divinely illustrates the power of self. Regardless of external influences, industry, growth, abundance, and love can be grown and cultivated. This book was so deep and enriching on so many levels. It made me look at my *Note: there is a lot of controversy and here say about the author of this book. Forget about it and enjoy this book with an innocent mind! The Education of Little Tree follows a young boy as he follows his Grandpa, learning and loving as he goes. From plowing to whiskey making, it divinely illustrates the power of self. Regardless of external influences, industry, growth, abundance, and love can be grown and cultivated. This book was so deep and enriching on so many levels. It made me look at my own life and what aspects of it were in harmony or out of harmony. Little Tree and his Grandparents lived with the land, not in spite of it like I feel a lot of our population is doing now. It motivated me to plant a good garden, enjoy nature more, love more. One aspect of the book that I really looked deeply at was the small side story of the sharecroppers. They were always going from place to place without ever enough money, food, clothing, etc. They depended heavily on others for their lifestyle. Little Tree and his family lived with the land and met their own needs accordingly, therefore thriving and not left wanting. They lived simply, within their means, and appreciated much. So which of my needs am I meeting through my own means? Naturally, I'm not going to move to a cabin in the woods with no electricity or plumbing. But am I relying too heavily on someone else for my food? My retirement? My happiness? Through my tears upon finishing The Education of Little Tree, I felt gratitude in knowing that true happiness does not come in the form of big houses and fancy cars. I'm working, striving to become more self-reliant, and enjoying the tender moments I have with my sweet family. I plan on making this a regular read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is one of my favorite books of all time. It's so much more than how you would describe it, so much more than words like story about a boy and his grandparents living in the South describe. The words have such power. They are so vivid; they recreate a world, a picture of a different time and place that is gone from us now. Because of their power, I can so perfectly imagine those hills, that place, and those people in my mind. Every time I read this book, I feel as I am there with them, livin This is one of my favorite books of all time. It's so much more than how you would describe it, so much more than words like story about a boy and his grandparents living in the South describe. The words have such power. They are so vivid; they recreate a world, a picture of a different time and place that is gone from us now. Because of their power, I can so perfectly imagine those hills, that place, and those people in my mind. Every time I read this book, I feel as I am there with them, living their life. I remember very clearly exactly where and when I was as I finished this book. It was on a train from Tokyo to Kyoto. That moment, how I felt, my actions at the time are now a part of me. I hope everyone loves this book as much as I do.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aslı Duman

    bir çocuğun çok içten ve saf dünyası ... Küçük Ağaç'ın hikayesi kesinlikle okunmalı ...

  7. 5 out of 5

    wheels

    embarrassing. after caty informed me, i googled the author and learned that the original edition was published as an autobiography, though carter is not of native american heritage, was a leader in the klu klux klan, and active as a segregtionist. wow, huh? if you ever want a defintion of appropriation and cultural theft, here's an exemplary one. (my tattered copy was dubbed as an autobiography.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    I got out of college without reading a heck of a lot of classic literature, American or otherwise. Now I'm trying to make up for lost time. I picked up The Education of Little Tree because there happened to be a copy here at my sister's house. I vaguely remembered there being some controversy á la Rigoberta Menchú or Nick Frey. The reissue I have from 1999 has "AMERICAN INDIANS/FICTION" on the back cover, but the introduction calls it "[Forrest Carter's] autobiographical remembrances of life wit I got out of college without reading a heck of a lot of classic literature, American or otherwise. Now I'm trying to make up for lost time. I picked up The Education of Little Tree because there happened to be a copy here at my sister's house. I vaguely remembered there being some controversy á la Rigoberta Menchú or Nick Frey. The reissue I have from 1999 has "AMERICAN INDIANS/FICTION" on the back cover, but the introduction calls it "[Forrest Carter's] autobiographical remembrances of life with his Eastern Cherokee Hill country grandparents." I decided to just go ahead and read the book, then google it later. Pre-google review: Touching - check Sage - check Well-written - check The characters were quite endearing and an interesting story unfolds before the backdrop of the Great Depression. Post-google review: You poser! This article in salon.com, entitled "The Education of Little Fraud" slams Forrest Carter (actually Asa Carter), pointing out that he was a founder of the Ku Klux Klan. http://archive.salon.com/books/featur... That's a detail that's hard to overlook. Then there's the fact that actual Cherokee Indians have said the book is inaccurate and tends toward the "Noble Savage" take on things. Honestly, where does that leave us? I guess I'm just going to have to call a spade a spade, or, in this case, call fiction fiction and just leave it at that. It's still a good read, taken with a grain of salt. I guess I won't base my entire understanding of the Cherokee way of life on this single 216-page novel. Nor my knowledge of Mayan cosmology on Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto." Now that's a lesson to take home.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wojtalik-courter

    I remembered enjoying this book when i read it about fifteen years ago. I stuck in on my list of 'have-reads' and gave it high marks. Then I read a little bit about this author. I just am flummoxed, though I shouldn't be; the levels to which people will stoop. Well, you can't deny he was a decent teller of tales, or lies, as Mark Twain might have said. A klansman who formed his own chapter, took part in lynchings, was a political writer who wrote George Wallace's infamous line, 'segregation now, I remembered enjoying this book when i read it about fifteen years ago. I stuck in on my list of 'have-reads' and gave it high marks. Then I read a little bit about this author. I just am flummoxed, though I shouldn't be; the levels to which people will stoop. Well, you can't deny he was a decent teller of tales, or lies, as Mark Twain might have said. A klansman who formed his own chapter, took part in lynchings, was a political writer who wrote George Wallace's infamous line, 'segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever'; this was an evil man who hated the very people to whom this book might have some appeal. I feel somewhat dirty for having enjoyed it, though somewhat hypocritical for not liking it now. Shouldn't art stand on its own? Should I not enjoy Wagner because he was an anti-Semite? Great googley moogley! I'm gonna have to go with erring on the side of my conscience on this one and recant my rating. He misrepresented the story as a true autobiography (though that, in itself, isn't enough; art is largely artifice), and he is not Wagner. This was just a good story, or at least an appealing one, that was made larger by the belief that it was real, and to discover exactly how unreal it was destroys the illusion. And in art, the illusion is everything.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I finished this book last weekend. I'd put it up there with The Alchemist and To Kill a Mockingbird, it was that powerful. This is a work of fiction (despite the intro, it is not really an autobiography) about a 5 year old Cheerokee boy who is raised by his grandparents, Cheerokee hill people, after the death of his parents. It is set in depression-era Tennessee. The story is told in vignettes; the chapters in chronological order. It was a quick read, just over 200 pages, with some mild language I finished this book last weekend. I'd put it up there with The Alchemist and To Kill a Mockingbird, it was that powerful. This is a work of fiction (despite the intro, it is not really an autobiography) about a 5 year old Cheerokee boy who is raised by his grandparents, Cheerokee hill people, after the death of his parents. It is set in depression-era Tennessee. The story is told in vignettes; the chapters in chronological order. It was a quick read, just over 200 pages, with some mild language. I wish I could describe this book better, but it was so moving and just amazing. I really recommend NOT google-ing the author until after you've read the book, he wasn't a very good person. Although, the story about this book getting the boot from Oprah's list is funny.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Interesting book, especially in the fact that the writer was also a speech writer for George Wallace, infamous Southern biggot and racist. Maybe that shows Carters true talent then, the ability to switch between such different literary voices...the question is, which voice is his? Interesting book, especially in the fact that the writer was also a speech writer for George Wallace, infamous Southern biggot and racist. Maybe that shows Carter´s true talent then, the ability to switch between such different literary voices...the question is, which voice is his?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Arzu

    kötü çeviriye rağmen kitabı çok sevmeniz mümkünden de öte.. okuma listenize ekleyin diyorum, neden mi? çünkü "iyi bir şeyle karşılaştığın zaman yapman gereken ilk şey bulabildiğin insanla onu paylaşmaktır."

  13. 5 out of 5

    George K.

    Βαθμολογία: 9/10 Το βιβλίο αυτό το είχα πιάσει στο παρελθόν δυο ή τρεις φορές και στις πρώτες λίγες σελίδες το άφηνα, γιατί προφανώς δεν είχα την κατάλληλη διάθεση για να το διαβάσω. Όμως χθες που το ξαναέπιασα και το ξεκίνησα, κάτι φαίνεται ότι άλλαξε. Διάβασα σερί κάτι παραπάνω από διακόσιες σελίδες, μέχρι που αναγκαστικά το άφησα για να πάω για ύπνο. Με είχε, πραγματικά, συνεπάρει. Σήμερα βρήκα χρόνο και διάβασα τις υπόλοιπες. Πρόκειται για ένα πολύ ωραίο και ιδιαίτερο βιβλίο, γεμάτο νοσταλγία, Βαθμολογία: 9/10 Το βιβλίο αυτό το είχα πιάσει στο παρελθόν δυο ή τρεις φορές και στις πρώτες λίγες σελίδες το άφηνα, γιατί προφανώς δεν είχα την κατάλληλη διάθεση για να το διαβάσω. Όμως χθες που το ξαναέπιασα και το ξεκίνησα, κάτι φαίνεται ότι άλλαξε. Διάβασα σερί κάτι παραπάνω από διακόσιες σελίδες, μέχρι που αναγκαστικά το άφησα για να πάω για ύπνο. Με είχε, πραγματικά, συνεπάρει. Σήμερα βρήκα χρόνο και διάβασα τις υπόλοιπες. Πρόκειται για ένα πολύ ωραίο και ιδιαίτερο βιβλίο, γεμάτο νοσταλγία, συγκινήσεις, εικόνες και νοήματα, το οποίο θεωρώ ότι μπορεί να προσφέρει πολλά πράγματα στον αναγνώστη, ανεξαρτήτου ηλικίας. Είναι ένα βιβλίο που αναδεικνύει έναν άλλο κόσμο, αλλά και έναν άλλο τρόπο ζωής, που είναι τόσο άγνωστος σε όλους εμάς τους κατοίκους των μεγαλουπόλεων (ή ακόμα και των μικρών πόλεων). Ο συγγραφέας κατάφερε να με ταξιδέψει στα Απαλάχια Όρη του Τενεσί, σε μια δύσκολη εποχή, και μ'έκανε ως ένα βαθμό να ζηλέψω τα κατά τα φαινόμενα ξέγνοιαστα και ελεύθερα παιδικά χρόνια του Μικρού Δέντρου, παρ'όλες τις δυσκολίες που έζησε και τις ατυχίες που αντιμετώπισε. Οι περιγραφές των τοπίων και του τρόπου ζωής των απλοϊκών και πολύ συμπαθητικών Ινδιάνων που πρωταγωνιστούν στην όλη ιστορία είναι ρεαλιστικές και συνάμα μαγικές. Επίσης, ο συγγραφέας έθιξε και κάποια ζητήματα που άπτονται της θρησκείας, της πολιτικής και του σύγχρονου πολιτισμού, μέσω της απλοϊκής και αθώας ματιάς του Μικρού Δέντρου. Δεν είναι απαραίτητο να γράψω ένα ολόκληρο κατεβατό για την ομορφιά και την ποιότητα που χαρακτηρίζει το βιβλίο αυτό, απλά διαβάστε το και θα καταλάβετε. Απλά, πιθανότατα, είναι ένα βιβλίο που χρειάζεται να διαβαστεί στον κατάλληλο χρόνο και χώρο, για να το απολαύσει κανείς όπως του αξίζει. Χάρηκα πολύ που επιτέλους το διάβασα και το μόνο σίγουρο είναι ότι θα το ξαναδιαβάσω κάποια στιγμή στο μέλλον.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sheyla

    Just finished this and I loved it. I will have to add this one to my list of Favorites. All told from the mouth of a 5 year old... Maybe that's why I was so entertained. I'm surrounded by kids all the time anyway. The wisdom and utter innocence of Little tree was so refreshing I felt like I was being schooled by a 5 year old. I loved learning about all the Indian traditions. Toward the end when he had to leave, I was so sad I ached for Little tree and his Grandparents. I fell in love with them an Just finished this and I loved it. I will have to add this one to my list of Favorites. All told from the mouth of a 5 year old... Maybe that's why I was so entertained. I'm surrounded by kids all the time anyway. The wisdom and utter innocence of Little tree was so refreshing I felt like I was being schooled by a 5 year old. I loved learning about all the Indian traditions. Toward the end when he had to leave, I was so sad I ached for Little tree and his Grandparents. I fell in love with them and Willow John and in the end when they passed I felt as if I too needed to mourn. I haven't been so emotionally connected like this to a book in a long time.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    This is the story of Little Tree, a five-year-old boy who is brought up by his Cherokee grandparents after his mother dies. Although the introduction claims it's an autobiographical reminiscence, it is in fact fiction. Moreover, the author is not Cherokee; at one point he was apparently a member of extreme racist groups in the USA. Nevertheless, it's a very well-written book. I gather that some of the details of Little Tree's life and Cherokee customs are not based on reality, but pure fiction; This is the story of Little Tree, a five-year-old boy who is brought up by his Cherokee grandparents after his mother dies. Although the introduction claims it's an autobiographical reminiscence, it is in fact fiction. Moreover, the author is not Cherokee; at one point he was apparently a member of extreme racist groups in the USA. Nevertheless, it's a very well-written book. I gather that some of the details of Little Tree's life and Cherokee customs are not based on reality, but pure fiction; that would perhaps upset people from this background, but for me it was a delightful insight into a world I knew nothing about. Moreoever, the book is very pro-Cherokee, and positive about Little Tree's experiences, educational and otherwise. White men are shown to be bigoted and legalistic, and Little Tree's brief foray into a boarding school is heart-breaking. I can only assume that the author had repented of his former beliefs when he wrote it. Some critics consider the language offensive - it's written in a distinctive style, almost as if in five-year-old language at times. But for me, it added to the realism of the story. All in all, I thought it a lovely book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    "Grandpa said he had many's the time seen that same kind of thing, feelings taking over sense, make as big a fools out of people as it had ol' Rippitt. Which I reckon is so." I think this quote sums up this entire novel. People letting their feelings take over their common sense where others are concerned. This is a novel about prejudice and discrimination against the Indian, the Jew, the White Man, the Politician, the Christian, the Poor, the Wealthy, the Sinner, the Saint, the Educated and the "Grandpa said he had many's the time seen that same kind of thing, feelings taking over sense, make as big a fools out of people as it had ol' Rippitt. Which I reckon is so." I think this quote sums up this entire novel. People letting their feelings take over their common sense where others are concerned. This is a novel about prejudice and discrimination against the Indian, the Jew, the White Man, the Politician, the Christian, the Poor, the Wealthy, the Sinner, the Saint, the Educated and the Uneducated. The Education of Little Tree is told through the voice of a young part Cherokee child and, I feel, it is very timely considering what is going on in our nation today. The lesson here being that prejudice and discrimination comes in many forms and goes in many directions and, most of it, is feelings taking over sense. The irony of this gem is that it was published in 1976 under the pen name for Asa Earl Carter. Mr. Carter was a man whose own history of prejudice and discrimination would make your hair stand on end. I like to think that this book, which was not really autobiographical as Carter touted, was Mr. Carters way of making amends for his past feelings taking over sense. My final rating: 4.5 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vannessa Anderson

    The Education of Little Tree touched me on every emotional level! Little Tree, at age four, went to live with his grandparents after the death of his mom; only a year earlier he’d lost his dad. Little Tree’s grandparents, in their seventies, knew they probably only had a few years to teach Little Tree everything he needed to know to survive on his own started teaching him life’s skills upon their arrival to bring him home to live with them. The story took place in the Appalachian mountains of Ten The Education of Little Tree touched me on every emotional level! Little Tree, at age four, went to live with his grandparents after the death of his mom; only a year earlier he’d lost his dad. Little Tree’s grandparents, in their seventies, knew they probably only had a few years to teach Little Tree everything he needed to know to survive on his own started teaching him life’s skills upon their arrival to bring him home to live with them. The story took place in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. While Little Tree was being educated, so was I. Author Carter’s extraordinary imagination and writing skills made me care deeply about Little Tree, his grandparents, and his grandparents friends who stood in courage in spite of the horrendous lifestyle they were force to endure. The Education of Little Tree is on a subject that many would like for us to forget. The Education of Little Tree is filled with history and so much useful information on surviving that you’ll want to write the information down. The Education of Little Tree will serve as a guide to effective parenting. The Education of Little Tree is a book that I will read over and over because with each read, I’ll learn something that I’d missed in a previous reading. The Education of Little Tree was my favorite book of 2012!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nash

    I loved this book when I was a lot younger! I'm going to have to revisit some of the books I really liked when I was a kid/YA to see how I feel about them now, to see how they hold up. Or should I just leave them be and preserve the love I had for them. It would be so disappointing to read something I loved as a kid/YA & then find it not to my liking or even think to myself, "why did I like this so much?"... I would hate for that to happen. Hmmm...what to do, what to do! What would you do?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was quite an emotional roller coaster. Little Tree sees everything with such innocence that the things he sees - racism and cruelty - are all the more heartbreaking. His relationship with his grandparents is quite deep and profound. I really loved this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Metin Yılmaz

    Mutlaka okunması gereken kitaplar arasında olmalı. Çocukların gözünden dünyaya bir bakış. Kızılderililerin yaşam biçimleri ile birlikte şekillenen bir hayata bakış açısı. Yazarın üslubu ve bakışı da çok güzeldi.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tuck

    Neat coming of age story bout a kid with n North Carolina mountain na during depression. Raised by Cherokee grandma and grandpa. Good details on farming , moon shining, walking in the woods.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Τα παρακάτω μπορεί να συμβούν μόνο στην Αμερική! Πήρα στα χέρια μου "την εκπαίδευση του Μικρού Δέντρου" με ένθερμες συστάσεις για ένα όμορφο και τρυφερό βιβλίο. Ανύποπτη για την προϊστορία του βιβλίου, το διάβασα με ανάμικτα συναισθήματα, κυρίως στενάχωρα. Το Μικρό Δέντρο, είναι ένα αγοράκι 5 ετών, που μένει ορφανό και πάει να μείνει με τον παππού και τη γιαγιά, που είναι ινδιάνοι Τσεροκί. Το Μικρό Δέντρο αφηγείται τη ζωή του τόσο πειστικά που ο αναγνώστης νομίζει ότι διαβάζει ημερολόγιο. Τα συνα Τα παρακάτω μπορεί να συμβούν μόνο στην Αμερική! Πήρα στα χέρια μου "την εκπαίδευση του Μικρού Δέντρου" με ένθερμες συστάσεις για ένα όμορφο και τρυφερό βιβλίο. Ανύποπτη για την προϊστορία του βιβλίου, το διάβασα με ανάμικτα συναισθήματα, κυρίως στενάχωρα. Το Μικρό Δέντρο, είναι ένα αγοράκι 5 ετών, που μένει ορφανό και πάει να μείνει με τον παππού και τη γιαγιά, που είναι ινδιάνοι Τσεροκί. Το Μικρό Δέντρο αφηγείται τη ζωή του τόσο πειστικά που ο αναγνώστης νομίζει ότι διαβάζει ημερολόγιο. Τα συναισθήματα που σου δημιουργούνται είναι πολλά και ενδιαφέροντα. Συγκίνηση για τον μικρούλη, λύπη για το λαό των ινδιάνων που εξοστρακίζεται από τα μέρη του σελίδα τη σελίδα, οργή για την ανθρώπινη αναλγησία... Τελείωσα το βιβλίο σχετικά γρήγορα. Μου έμεινε η γεύση της συγκίνησης και της στεναχώριας, οπότε είπα να δω μήπως ήμουν και η μόνη που το πήρα τόσο βαριά. Γκούγκλαρα το βιβλίο και τον συγγραφέα και βρέθηκα μπροστά στην έκπληξη! Μπροστά στην Αμερικανιά, όπως τα λέω αυτά, σε όλο της το μεγαλείο! Το βιβλίο δεν ήταν αυτοβιογραφικό (καλά αυτό, συγχωρείται, ούτε το πρώτο ούτε το τελευταίο θα είναι που μοιάζει αλλά δεν είναι) και ο συγγραφέας ήταν ένας απίστευτος ρατσιστής και ιδρυτής μιας τοπικής οργάνωσης Κου Κλουξ Κλαν!!! Είναι αυτό που λένε "εκβίαση συναισθήματος" και αυτός ο τύπος το πέτυχε πολύ καλά! Μου θύμισε την ιστορία που πιάστηκα κορόιδο με μια ζητιάνα και την ανάπηρη κόρη της! Ξεγελάστηκα μέχρι κι εγώ! Έτυχε να περιμένω κάποιον για ώρα και ξαφνικά βλέπω την κόρη να σηκώνεται υγιέστατη για να ξεπιαστεί, τη μάνα να τηλεφωνεί στον πατέρα που κατέφθασε και τη συνομιλία και των 3 που σχεδιάζαν να φύγουν με ταξί γιατί είχαν κουραστεί από το πρωί! Τέτοια ιστορία ήταν και του Κάρτερ!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lora

    I struggle with this. I don't know if it falls flat because it does not appeal to me or it falls flat because it feels faked and uneven or if it falls flat because I am familiar with the controversy around the author. I don't think it's the last item, though I think the prior knowledge may have tainted my read somewhat. There are just too many passages where I know I'm supposed to laugh, but the laugh doesn't work for me, or there are passages that just sound like a cracked bell or a dull flat n I struggle with this. I don't know if it falls flat because it does not appeal to me or it falls flat because it feels faked and uneven or if it falls flat because I am familiar with the controversy around the author. I don't think it's the last item, though I think the prior knowledge may have tainted my read somewhat. There are just too many passages where I know I'm supposed to laugh, but the laugh doesn't work for me, or there are passages that just sound like a cracked bell or a dull flat note. The good parts I have read in better form in other books. It's just not working for me. I was about a third of the way through and realized I was scanning and then I asked myself why I was reading it: because someone recommended it. So I closed it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    A dear new soul recommended me this novel, and am I so GLAD. It's like Huckleberry Finn meets Laura Ingalls Wilder with Native American culture and folklore thrown in. Written from the perspective of a little boy (similar to Huck Finn) who's orphaned when his parents die, he's adopted by his grandparents. You learn the Cherokee way of looking at the land, the environment and nature. The intersting thing, is that most novels of this sort take place during the "Wild West" migration period, but this A dear new soul recommended me this novel, and am I so GLAD. It's like Huckleberry Finn meets Laura Ingalls Wilder with Native American culture and folklore thrown in. Written from the perspective of a little boy (similar to Huck Finn) who's orphaned when his parents die, he's adopted by his grandparents. You learn the Cherokee way of looking at the land, the environment and nature. The intersting thing, is that most novels of this sort take place during the "Wild West" migration period, but this one doesn't. Interestingly enough, it takes place during the Depression. And through the boy's naivette, we're introduced to some interesting and true to life themes: the forced assimilation of Native Americans to the white man's life (Christianity, mission schools, reservations). Lovingly, the novel never comes across as preachy, which is key when observing the world through a small boy's eyes. I absolutely could NOT stop crying the last three chapters. The only thing I didn't like was that I felt we didn't know enough about where and what Little Tree was going to do now. A must read for elementary teachers to read aloud, mothers and fathers to read to their children, but absolutely lovely for adults, too.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zeren

    Kötü çeviriler kendilerini zor okuturlar. Bir istisna varsa o da bu kitaptır. Kalbi olan bir kitap Küçük Ağacın Eğitimi. Doğayla kopan bağlarımızı onarmak çok kolay değil. Dünyaya geldiğimiz o kadim bilgiyi toprağa gömüp üzerine onlarca "medeniyet" kuralı çok oldu. Kaybettik. Ama neyse ki hala bundan bahseden kitaplar ve insanlar var.

  26. 5 out of 5

    ดินสอ สีไม้

    เปนหนังสือทีดีมากๆ เลมหนึง วิธีเลากดี วิธีบรรยาย ทังทีเลาเรืองเรือยๆ ธรรมดาๆ ผานมุมมองของเดกชายเลกๆ ทีกำลังเติบโตขึนเปนอินเดียนแดง แตกลับสวยงามในความเรียบงาย ธรรมดา มีครบทุกรส ทังเสียดสี มีอารมณขัน เศรา แตเขมแขง สงางาม เป็นหนังสือที่ดีมากๆ เล่มหนึ่ง วิธีเล่าก็ดี วิธีบรรยาย ทั้งที่เล่าเรื่องเรื่อยๆ ธรรมดาๆ ผ่านมุมมองของเด็กชายเล็กๆ ที่กำลังเติบโตขึ้นเป็นอินเดียนแดง แต่กลับสวยงามในความเรียบง่าย ธรรมดา มีครบทุกรส ทั้งเสียดสี มีอารมณ์ขัน เศร้า แต่เข้มแข็ง สง่างาม

  27. 5 out of 5

    Barb Graf

    I first heard of this book on an Oprah show probably in the mid 1990's; she said such high praise of it. (I understand later she "took it off" her book shelf due to the controversy around the author's racism). I am not in any way supportive of racism; but this book appears to be something very good that the author did and that Oprah had recognized. That is why I first read it and I have passed it on to many people cause I liked it so much. It did seem to start a bit slow for me the first time I I first heard of this book on an Oprah show probably in the mid 1990's; she said such high praise of it. (I understand later she "took it off" her book shelf due to the controversy around the author's racism). I am not in any way supportive of racism; but this book appears to be something very good that the author did and that Oprah had recognized. That is why I first read it and I have passed it on to many people cause I liked it so much. It did seem to start a bit slow for me the first time I read it and with much sadness in the young boy's life. I had not seen it for some time then got a copy just a few years ago and then I started passing it around again and was so delighted that my mother-in-law really liked it. She read so many books; we had fun one Christmas that she gave it as gifts to several grandchildren; those of us who had read it enjoyed telling our favorite part of the book. There is a certain innocence that comes out in it; but it is evident that the author was hurt by losses/ his life story (another book that is loosely autobiographical: Forrest = Little Tree).

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Hilton

    This is a beautiful little book that follows the story of 5 year old orphan Little Tree who is taken in, loved deeply, and guided thoughtfully by his grandparents in the Cherokee tradition during the Great Depression. It is a nice contrast to Sherman Alexie's "Diary of a Part Time Indian," as it show Native Americans in wholly different setting but with some of the same values. Carter's writing is elegant in its simplicity. Little Tree's narration is believable and compelling. Each chapter is its This is a beautiful little book that follows the story of 5 year old orphan Little Tree who is taken in, loved deeply, and guided thoughtfully by his grandparents in the Cherokee tradition during the Great Depression. It is a nice contrast to Sherman Alexie's "Diary of a Part Time Indian," as it show Native Americans in wholly different setting but with some of the same values. Carter's writing is elegant in its simplicity. Little Tree's narration is believable and compelling. Each chapter is its own story, but the book hangs together effortlessly. The main characters, and some of the important minor ones - are richly painted. I want to meet these people and learn from them. There's a crazy controversy about the author's background. It turns out the book is fictional and there's more to it than that. But, read The Education of Little Tree before digging into this. I'm afraid it could ruin an otherwise magical experience for you. Do read this book. It is special and shouldn't be missed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Hughes

    I don't know how this has slipped under my radar for so long. Little Tree has captured my heart. This was a beautiful and poignant memoir of a Cherokee boy raised by his grandparents in the Depression. The narrator's voice as a young child was so sweet and completely believable and captivating. I feel like saying too much would be inappropriate for a book like this, since as Little Tree says, "Granpa said if there was less words, there wouldn't be as much trouble in the world." On L.T.'s 6th birt I don't know how this has slipped under my radar for so long. Little Tree has captured my heart. This was a beautiful and poignant memoir of a Cherokee boy raised by his grandparents in the Depression. The narrator's voice as a young child was so sweet and completely believable and captivating. I feel like saying too much would be inappropriate for a book like this, since as Little Tree says, "Granpa said if there was less words, there wouldn't be as much trouble in the world." On L.T.'s 6th birthday: "Granma said I was lucky, and more than likely one in a hundred million. ... I told Granma I was right proud of the whole thing; and right off, I could tell that I wasn't afraid of dark in the hollows anymore. Granpa said I had the uppers on him, being born special and all. He said he wished he had been picked out for such. Granpa said he had always been hampered with a suspicion of being frightened of the dark, and now would total depend on me to lead him about in dark situations. Which I told him I would."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This is a children's tale (he is the narrator) of the years he spends with his Grandpa and Grandma after his parents have passed. It is sweet, heart-warming and details his Cherokee education of nature and lifestyle. The hounds they own are also full characters and their immersion into events delightful, IMHO. There are aspects that support stereotype to the max, and yet it is a good read. I enjoyed it. Regardless of the hype and history re the author or his agenda, or its being structured into a This is a children's tale (he is the narrator) of the years he spends with his Grandpa and Grandma after his parents have passed. It is sweet, heart-warming and details his Cherokee education of nature and lifestyle. The hounds they own are also full characters and their immersion into events delightful, IMHO. There are aspects that support stereotype to the max, and yet it is a good read. I enjoyed it. Regardless of the hype and history re the author or his agenda, or its being structured into a sentimental flow, I thought it was well worth the read and a loving embrace to Cherokee "eyes" for the surrounds of mountain Tennessee during the Depression years prior to WWII. Be they a rigid translation of the actual truth or an emotional bonding fiction/ rendition. I only lacked giving it that 4th star because for me it "tried too hard" within simplistic categorizing in several scenarios and within some characters and events which Little Tree and his Grandfather witness and effect.

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