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Batman: Dark Victory PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Batman: Dark Victory
Author: Jeph Loeb
Publisher: Published October 1st 2002 by DC Comics (first published October 1st 2000)
ISBN: 9781563898686
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The sequel to the critically acclaimed BATMAN: THE LONG HALLOWEEN, DARK VICTORY continues the story of an early time in Batman's life when James Gordon, Harvey Dent, and the vigilante himself were all just beginning their roles as Gotham's protectors.Once a town controlled by organized crime, Gotham City suddenly finds itself being run by lawless freaks, such as Poison Ivy The sequel to the critically acclaimed BATMAN: THE LONG HALLOWEEN, DARK VICTORY continues the story of an early time in Batman's life when James Gordon, Harvey Dent, and the vigilante himself were all just beginning their roles as Gotham's protectors.Once a town controlled by organized crime, Gotham City suddenly finds itself being run by lawless freaks, such as Poison Ivy, Mr. Freeze, and the Joker. Witnessing his city's dark evolution, the Dark Knight completes his transformation into the city's greatest defender. He faces multiple threats, including the apparent return of a serial killer called Holiday. Batman's previous investigation of Holiday's killings revealed that more than one person was responsible for the murders. So the question remains: who is committing Holiday's crimes this time? And how many will die before Batman learns the truth?   This volume collects Batman: Dark Victory #0-13.

30 review for Batman: Dark Victory

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lᴀʏᴀ Rᴀɴɪ

    So, okay then. This is the sequel to The Long Halloween which I was not the biggest fan of to begin with. Still, on the enjoyment scale, this one was better. That was until I got to the last two issues. Ironically enough, while The Long Halloween had a rough start but a nonetheless merciful albeit incomplete resolution, Dark Victory managed to get a stronger and more concise beginning but a more frustrating and pointless ending. I don't understand this travesty. The Knightfall series is honestly So, okay then. This is the sequel to The Long Halloween which I was not the biggest fan of to begin with. Still, on the enjoyment scale, this one was better. That was until I got to the last two issues. Ironically enough, while The Long Halloween had a rough start but a nonetheless merciful albeit incomplete resolution, Dark Victory managed to get a stronger and more concise beginning but a more frustrating and pointless ending. I don't understand this travesty. The Knightfall series is honestly more better written. Well, Loeb's stories should be fundamentally incomparable to Knightfall since the latter after all was written by multiple writers across different Bat-titles. The sole reason I compare them is becauase I was also quite lukewarm towards Knightfall but I would pick the omnibus series over either of Loeb's work any day. I don't want to get into details about Dark Victory. Ultimately it's a Batman story that brought no joy or appreciation for me. I thought I could like any kind of Bat-story out there (I eventually did warm up to Greg Hurwitz in his writing for New 52 The Dark Knight run) but Jeph Loeb had officially made me question that reality. I can state from here on out that I don't enjoy the way he writes Batman. There were a few areas that have potentials, most notably for Dark Victory. The central murder mystery story had a better foundation; a series of cop kilings with the murderer pinning notes on the corpses depicting the child's game Hangman as secret messages. At least the victims were sympathetic people and not criminals who are a tad more irredeemable. But the holiday-themed murders were needlessly overplayed like the torture horror of the SAW franchise. Next, both Batman and Commissioner Gordon show remorse and guilt over the loss of Harvey Dent. Batman spent most of the time blaming himself in his inner monologues about Dent's transformation to Two Face. This would have been acceptable except that I never really saw a friendship developed in the prequel among these three to make the drama and internal conflict believable enough for me to care about. And then there's the women. The female characterizations were easily  appalling and cheap as far as stereotypes and pigeonholing goes. Every woman is given the roles among grieving spouses, easily manipulated girlfriends and whimsical seductresses--and with little to no clarification for motivation or pay-off to their arcs whatsoever. I love Bruce and Selina's relationship in general but Loeb had accomplished the impossible feat: he made me hate them together. I couldn't stand their stupid dance of coquettish nonsense, especially so in Dark Victory. Aside from the badly drawn costume, Catwoman had a weak arc for both Loeb stories and therefore her usual morally ambiguous actions were not as promising or as riveting to see unfold. The only two women who are at least trying to break the mold were gangster Sofia Falcone and possible sociopath Gilda Dent who have interesting characterizations from the start but were sadly overlooked and underdeveloped midway through both stories. I don't even want to acknowledge the wasteful space female District Attorney Porter took up for Dark Victory. What a pathetic and unbelievable character. And goddamn Dick Grayson who is featured in the Absolute Dark Victory cover prominently doesn't even have a major contribution to the storyline. All he did here was sulk and look morose. He isn't Jason Todd or Damian Wayne, dammit. Where's the sparkling personality I've always loved about the first Boy Wonder? Overall--yeah, fuck it. I don't have any parting words. But I will rate this one star higher than fucking Long Halloween just because. RECOMMENDED: 7/10 DO READ MY BATMAN COMICS REVIEWS AT:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    FINAL RATING: 4.5 STARS Dark Victory lived up to my expectations. I loved The Long Halloween, but I actually liked this a bit more. While I think this is an amazing follow up from The Long Halloween, some of my questions from the first one still remained unanswered, while some were finally put to a close. The conflict. The deceit. The twists. The turns. The action. I loved all of them. Full review to follow.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    New 52 Batman and Re-birth batman fans take note: HERE IS HOW BATMAN SHOULD BE DONE! All Clear? Good. Dark Victory is the superb sequel to the excellent The Long Halloween. Brilliantly written by Jeph Loeb and artfully drawn by Tim Sale these two books were used, along with Frank Miller's DKR, to set the tone for Christopher Nolan's movies. Dark Victory takes up with Harvey Dent becoming Two-Face. There is a gang war going on in Gotham. This is during Batman's earlier years. You can see, as the st New 52 Batman and Re-birth batman fans take note: HERE IS HOW BATMAN SHOULD BE DONE! All Clear? Good. Dark Victory is the superb sequel to the excellent The Long Halloween. Brilliantly written by Jeph Loeb and artfully drawn by Tim Sale these two books were used, along with Frank Miller's DKR, to set the tone for Christopher Nolan's movies. Dark Victory takes up with Harvey Dent becoming Two-Face. There is a gang war going on in Gotham. This is during Batman's earlier years. You can see, as the story progresses, the "normal" criminal element of Gotham being phased out by the "freaks". There is so much to love here for any Batman fan. The best part is we see Batman as the Detective he is-something that sometimes gets left behind in recent tellings. This is a murder-mystery. The cast of villains is large and, I have to admit, didn't realize who the true killer was until the big reveal. Impressive. This Batman is brooding and dark. We rarely see Bruce Wayne, and then only for his interactions with Selina Kyle, because this is a Batman story. It is also a story of how Dick Grayson became Robin. I won't spoil any of the excellent plot so all I can say is- IMHO this, along with Long Halloween, is one of the finest Batman stories around. Period. Read it. Enjoy it. It is a true work of comic book art!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    What a Batman book!!! Maybe its the mood I'm in today but I loved it all! The story was outstanding. The art I, surprisingly, loved. Just great!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    Let's face it, a majority of Batman readers hate Robin. Why? No clue. I always thought he was a nice contrast to Batman's loner characteristics. A lot of people mention that Robin doesn't fit a Batman story, and that's because Robin "is nothing like Batman because Batman has always fought alone". Well, I would love to agree with those people, but I would be a liar if I did. First of all, about Robin, this graphic novel does explain Robin's origin. Dick Grayson (the first Robin) loses his parents Let's face it, a majority of Batman readers hate Robin. Why? No clue. I always thought he was a nice contrast to Batman's loner characteristics. A lot of people mention that Robin doesn't fit a Batman story, and that's because Robin "is nothing like Batman because Batman has always fought alone". Well, I would love to agree with those people, but I would be a liar if I did. First of all, about Robin, this graphic novel does explain Robin's origin. Dick Grayson (the first Robin) loses his parents in an accident similar to Bruce Wayne's parents, and Bruce decides to take him in because he feels sorry for him. However, Dick wants justice, and in time Batman reveals himself as Bruce Wayne to the young Dick Grayson. Bruce trains Dick, blah blah blah...You get the dynamic duo. I just wanted to point out that Batman and Robin may not have similar personalities, but they share similar traumas. Now, the book is often referred to as "the origin of Robin". That is a pretty far off description as Dick Grayson doesn't appear until the second half of the book, and only helps Batman a little during the end. This story is actually a sequel to Batman: The Long Halloween, and continues the story of the Holiday killer and Falcone mafia family, as well as Harvey Dent and his rough new life as Two Face. The plot is almost identical to the one in Long Halloween: There is a killer known as the "Hang Man", and he/she is killing cops and leaving hang man (the game) clues on each of the bodies. Just like Long Halloween, Jeph Loeb does a great writing job to make you suspect everyone in the story as well as some dead characters. Is it Harvey Dent (now Two Face), a Falcone, the new District Attorney, or someone else? You will have to read to find out. Overall, the book kept me reading. The mystery gets you guessing at who the real killer is, and has a nice reveal at the end. The 4 star rating is because the plot was strikingly similar to the one in Long Halloween, but there were differences to make them two completely different stories. The art, by Tim Sale, is amazing because...It's Tim Sale. Also, if you are a fan of Batman villains, there are over seven present in the story, so there is a nice variety of Batman fights going down. I highly recommend this to Batman lovers and graphic-novel-readers- alike. However, do yourself a favor and read the amazing Batman: The Long Halloween. It will help you understand the story better and it is a great read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I've read Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale's Batman books in the order they've written them with Haunted Knight coming first followed by The Long Hallowe'en and finally coming to Dark Victory. I suppose Loeb ought to be congratulated for bringing the Batman stories back to their original format, that is detective/crime stories, where he brings the mob and Batman side by side as natural enemies. Here's the story: a killer is killing people by hanging them on holidays (Hallowe'en, Thanksgiving, Christmas, e I've read Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale's Batman books in the order they've written them with Haunted Knight coming first followed by The Long Hallowe'en and finally coming to Dark Victory. I suppose Loeb ought to be congratulated for bringing the Batman stories back to their original format, that is detective/crime stories, where he brings the mob and Batman side by side as natural enemies. Here's the story: a killer is killing people by hanging them on holidays (Hallowe'en, Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc) and leaving notes on their bodies with the hangman game on. Early on Arkham is attacked and the Batman's best loved villains escape (Joker, Two Face, Penguin, Poison Ivy, Riddler) and as the bodies pile up the pressure is on for Batman to stop this killer but he'll need help. Enter Robin. This ain't exactly gripping stuff. If you're like me and have read a fair number of Batman you'll already know this storyline reeks of The Long Hallowe'en. The storyline is practically identical with the holiday killer (this time not the weird Falcone guy but he's in this story too) being renamed the hangman killer and the villains all escaping and Batman encountering them laboriously one by one. Also do we need to hear the same old Robin origin story? This book is nearly 400 pages! 400 pages of rehashed material with nothing new at all. It's a chore to slog through even if you're new to Batman. Loeb can't seem to get out of 2nd gear while I'm beginning to see Sale as one of the worst Batman artists out there. Joker looks ridiculous, his smile isn't disturbing or grotesque it's stupid. It covers his entire face so that it's just a giant toothy smile with a tiny face above it. Bruce Wayne appears to be 7 feet tall. And what's with the tedious mafia characters? They're all boring stereotypes, eating spaghetti in restaurants thats a cover for smuggling operations! Come on. The press all have pieces of card with "PRESS" written on them and slotted into their hats. This is really a miss. If you've read The Long Hallowe'en then you can count reading this too as it's completely the same. Only difference is Robin and if you know anything about Batman you'll know what happens there. Give this a miss, it's a dull, dull story and for a character as interesting as Batman that's criminal.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    Dark Victory is the sequel to Batman: The Long Halloween. The Long Halloween tells the tragic story of Harvey Dent (aka “Two Face”) and his fall from grace. Dark Victory follows this up by continuing the stories of Harvey, the Falcone crime family, and the Bat himself in the aftermath of Harvey’s imprisonment. The book follows the exact same format as its predecessor, and somewhat surprisingly uses the exact same theme to tie the episodes together. Each issue takes place on a different holiday, a Dark Victory is the sequel to Batman: The Long Halloween. The Long Halloween tells the tragic story of Harvey Dent (aka “Two Face”) and his fall from grace. Dark Victory follows this up by continuing the stories of Harvey, the Falcone crime family, and the Bat himself in the aftermath of Harvey’s imprisonment. The book follows the exact same format as its predecessor, and somewhat surprisingly uses the exact same theme to tie the episodes together. Each issue takes place on a different holiday, and each holiday a victim is murdered by an anonymous serial killer. Batman & Gordon struggle to crack the case, which has no lack of suspects since Arkham Asylum has suffered a major security breach and most of Batman’s famous foes are on the loose. I thought The Long Halloween was a real classic, and its sequel does a number of things well. Dark Victory is most famous for telling how Batman & Robin got together, but it doesn’t beat this story into the ground. Instead, it manages to tie the Dark Knight’s acceptance of Robin as a partner into the events of The Long Halloween and Bruce’s own sense of loneliness. I am one of those readers who finds Robin mostly annoying, but I thought that his character fit nicely into this story and actually added to my enjoyment of the tale. The story is interesting, and like The Long Halloween features the full panoply of Batman rogues. Loeb & Sale do a good job of making this more than standard beat-‘em-up fare (always dull) and creating a memorable story with recurring themes that fit nicely into the narrative. I have always really liked Tim Sale’s artwork, and this book is no different. With the exception of the way he draws the Joker (which is a little too “out there”), I love how he interprets everything in the Batman universe, and the art in this book is a dark joy to behold. The one nitpick I have is the similarity to the plot of The Long Halloween. I love the recurring characters and the extension of some of The Long Halloween’s storylines. But building the story around another holiday killer made the story feel a bit too much like a re-hash of The Long Halloween, particularly in the first half before the plot begins to separate itself. But that’s a minor complaint, and overall I thought this was a very strong story with outstanding artwork that will satisfy the vast majority of Bat-fans out there. 4 stars, highly recommended!

  8. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    As dark and well-written as this story is, I still couldn't get into it too much. Several of Batman's enemies are featured, but mostly as a side note. The real focus is on the puzzle behind the Hangman murders which their author hides pretty well until, somehow, it's brought into the light in the very last chapter. Quite unceremoniously if you ask me. This story, even though it also covers Grayson joining Batman as Robin, didn't thrill me as much as I expected. It felt bland and old, but perhaps As dark and well-written as this story is, I still couldn't get into it too much. Several of Batman's enemies are featured, but mostly as a side note. The real focus is on the puzzle behind the Hangman murders which their author hides pretty well until, somehow, it's brought into the light in the very last chapter. Quite unceremoniously if you ask me. This story, even though it also covers Grayson joining Batman as Robin, didn't thrill me as much as I expected. It felt bland and old, but perhaps that was the goal. Janice Porter is the new district attorney after Harvey Dent went mad and became Two-Face. The Falcone crime family assault Arkham Asylum and free many of the inmates in their goal to get at Harvey. Batman recaptures some of the inmates, but Harvey disappears. At the same time a string of gruesome murders starts, all targeting policemen. Each victim is hanged and carries a note with a children's game, the Hangman, with cryptic messages written in blood. (view spoiler)[After much running around, while a cop turns up dead each month, Harvey gives himself up. During his trial he escapes with help from his associates. Batman figures out a connection between Porter and Harvey - they were lovers since her college days. But the true Hangman killer is Sofia, the current leader of the most powerful crime family. (hide spoiler)]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jace

    I don't have a lot to say about this book. It's a sequel to The Long Halloween, and the connection shows. Ultimately, DARK VICTORY suffers from its similarity to its predecessor. Aside from the details of who gets murdered, the stories are nearly identical: An unknown villain kills his victims on holidays. Harvey Dent/Two-Face is suspected in the crimes. Batman tumbles with all of his rogues gallery while investigating the murders. The killer is (disappointingly) revealed to be a character you nev I don't have a lot to say about this book. It's a sequel to The Long Halloween, and the connection shows. Ultimately, DARK VICTORY suffers from its similarity to its predecessor. Aside from the details of who gets murdered, the stories are nearly identical: An unknown villain kills his victims on holidays. Harvey Dent/Two-Face is suspected in the crimes. Batman tumbles with all of his rogues gallery while investigating the murders. The killer is (disappointingly) revealed to be a character you never suspected. The problem with DARK VICTORY is that its far too dependent on The Long Halloween. If you haven't read the first story, a lot of DARK VICTORY will be lost on you. And if you have read the first story, why would you want to read the same story all over again? I also take issue with these stories being marketed as "murder mysteries." This is not Sherlock Holmes or Agatha Christie. There are no clues left along the way that would allow the reader (or Batman, for that matter) to discern the identity of the killer. No one actually even discovers the killer's identity--it's just revealed near the end of the book. One high point in the story is the introduction of Robin, and the developing relationship between Dick and Bruce. Loeb does a good job using their shared history of loss to bond them together. The best part of this book is Tim Sale's art. His figures are so angular and colorful. The pages are a delight to look at, especially the ones featuring Batman's rogues gallery. I love his jawsy depiction of the Joker above all others. Overall, it's not a bad book--I just don't see the point of it. The Long Halloween was a decent story, but DARK VICTORY tries to duplicate its success without adding anything new to the mix. Makes a decent library read, but I wouldn't shell out money for this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Another big piece of Batman history by writer Jeph Loeb and artist Tim Sale. But this time, we get to welcome with big open arms to the best – this might be debatable, but not with me – Boy Wonder. As if the cover art doesn’t already show you who we’re talking about here, Dark Victory introduces Mr. Dick Grayson into the Batman universe. This trade paperback collects all 14 issues published back in 1999 and 2000 and follows the events of The Lon You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Another big piece of Batman history by writer Jeph Loeb and artist Tim Sale. But this time, we get to welcome with big open arms to the best – this might be debatable, but not with me – Boy Wonder. As if the cover art doesn’t already show you who we’re talking about here, Dark Victory introduces Mr. Dick Grayson into the Batman universe. This trade paperback collects all 14 issues published back in 1999 and 2000 and follows the events of The Long Halloween. The story focuses on a killer that prowls the city of Gotham and brings Death to Gotham City police officers. Behind every corpse, a hangman riddle is left revealing a hint – impossible to decipher as a reader, might I add. The killer goes by the name of the Hangman and seeks to fulfill a purpose that no one can pinpoint, except one fellow. Characters such Harvey Dent, Catwoman, the Joker, the Falcone family members and plenty more make more appearances in Dark Victory, only to make Batman and Gordon’s life a lot harder. The story isn’t bad, alas, but it’s also something we’ve seen before. Especially, if you’ve read The Long Halloween. It would’ve been a lot more pleasant to have seen a different kind of plot line to close out the story of a lot of important characters that Frank Miller introduced in Batman: Year One. In Dark Victory, after a breakout in Arkham Asylum, home to the most insane killers, Harvey Dent along with other key characters are freed and Gotham citizens worst nightmare just became reality. Things hit rock bottom when more murders happen on holidays only to allude Batman and friends that the Holiday killer is back. As the number of suspects increases, the original Holiday killer, the Calendar Man and Harvey Dent become prime suspects in this hunt for a killer. Exploring more of some important characters, Dark Victory shows more depth into Bruce Wayne’s issue of wearing a cape at night and a billionaire by day. His incapability to retain a normal relationship, in this case our favorite cat burglar, Selena Kyle, solely shows this struggle. This was really well portrayed by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale and gave a nice side-story to Batman’s nocturnal activities. As we might have figured, Bruce’s need to serve justice is always put ahead of his own life. In his case, happiness cannot be achieved through normality and peace. Happiness resides in Gotham’s health. Infected by criminals, Batman will always struggle to rid his city of crimes before he would ever know anything remotely Zen. In his lonesome fight for justice, Gordon and Alfred remain his only friends, but then again, he never seeks to put them in harm’s way. Dark Victory, however, introduces readers to a new character that will forever mark Batman’s adventures and seek their unity through a common denominator: solitude. If you ask me, Robin’s part of the storyline was probably the better bit of this tale. I absolutely love how the writer managed to depict the character and show the similarities between our favorite protagonist and Robin. Their tragic past brought them together only to make a duo that no man could ever forget. Of all three projects by Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale, I felt like Dark Victory mastered the artwork that was initially used in The Long Halloween. The colors were on point, the crispier and scarier portrayal of characters was awesome and the blood was splashier than ever. The panels with death scenes were epic and everything related to death itself were shocking and well displayed. Batman continues to reign fear and is drawn with even more darkness. Robin’s portrayal on the other hand was rather original. He had the same tone of darkness and loneliness as Batman and wasn’t shown as some happy and jolly red, yellow and green side-kick. What the Boy Wonder brings into the story and Batman’s life shows reader a little ray of light for the Dark Knight. Additional purpose and meaning is given to Batman’s life and helping Robin avoid a dark and gloomy world of darkness brings a little joy into the caped crusaders life. If you think this could be overlooked, you’re wrong. Dark Victory remains a story arc that all Batman fan should acquaint with. You cannot skip over this one, since you’ll be missing out on a big part of Batman’s legacy. I mean, come on, don’t you want to know how Robin became Robin? Don’t you want to know who the Hangman is? Don’t you want to see the first love sparks between Selena Kyle and Bruce Wayne? Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale delivers a compelling murder mystery tale with brilliant artwork to keep you entertained and shrieking at the sight of ugly, ugly, very ugly Penguin and Joker. Although the story depends heavily on what happened in The Long Halloween and continues on the same kind of format, when it comes to plot, as the Long Halloween, Dark Victory is a story worth your time, a comic that’s just indispensable. If you want to start reading Robin: Year One or Catwoman: When in Rome, you don’t have a choice but to pass by this route. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Batman: Dark Victory: An excellent follow-up to Long Halloween Originally posted at Fantasy Literature Batman: Dark Victory (2000) takes place immediately after Batman: The Long Halloween (1997). In the aftermath of the Holiday Killer, Gotham’s Falcone and Maroni crime families are in chaos. Dark Victory is steeped in the same dark crime noir atmosphere as Long Halloween , so if you liked the first title you will like this one too. It’s all about mysterious killings, Mafia wars, the rise of Batman: Dark Victory: An excellent follow-up to Long Halloween Originally posted at Fantasy Literature Batman: Dark Victory (2000) takes place immediately after Batman: The Long Halloween (1997). In the aftermath of the Holiday Killer, Gotham’s Falcone and Maroni crime families are in chaos. Dark Victory is steeped in the same dark crime noir atmosphere as Long Halloween , so if you liked the first title you will like this one too. It’s all about mysterious killings, Mafia wars, the rise of the arch-villians, and the legacy of the past that weighs heavily on Batman and his friends and enemies. Everyone is struggling with a difficult past, and circumstances never allow them reprieve, so the story has the weight of inevitable tragedy. It’s not surprising that Christopher Nolan and David Goyer took direct inspiration from these two books when they created the moody and grim THE DARK KNIGHT film trilogy. Since the events of Long Halloween , Alberto Falcone is interred in Arkham Asylum, Sofia Falcone Gigante is confined to a wheelchair with a metal head brace, and Maroni’s sons Umberto and Pino have tried to take up the reins, but freaks like The Joker, The Riddler, Poison Ivy, and Two-Face have risen in power. The balance has shifted in their favor, but the Mafia will not cede control of the city so easily. Batman and Jim Gordon are still shaken by the transformation of DA Harvey Dent into the mercurial villain Two Face, and mourn the fact that they could not prevent it. Selina Kyle continues to show interest in the taciturn Bruce Wayne, but he is generally unresponsive. A new DA named Janice Porter comes in to replace Harvey Dent, and her first initiative is to reopen the case of Alberto Falcone, claiming he is not responsible for all the Holiday murders. Into this brave new world a new killer emerges: The Hangman. He targets cops and former cops, both upstanding or corrupt. They are left hanging in public with cryptic hangman clues pinned to their clothes. Clues point to a connection with Harvey Dent, so Batman and Jim Gordon go hunting for him. Dark Victory is a very dense and tangled narrative. It takes us on a tour of the sewers of Gotham, the courtroom, Wayne Manor, battles between the Freaks and mafia in the streets, and the ever-changing relationship of Batman and Catwoman. I really like the fact that the story is heavily character-driven, not just a series of fights. It also aspires to the classic crime noir theme of criminals unable to escape their own dark pasts, such as Mario Falcone who wants to erase the bad name of his father and make the Falcone empire legitimate. Even Alberto, who was jailed for the Holiday murders, seems to want to make a break with the past. But Sofia Falcone is determined to revive the Falcone criminal empire, so the siblings find themselves at odds. Meanwhile, despite dozens of clues and leads, Batman and Jim Gordon find themselves getting no closer to solving the Hangman murders. Though each clues clearly points to Harvey Dent, they suspect this is designed to take them off the scent of the real killer. Harvey Dent himself is the ultimate example of a man torn between conflicting imperatives, struggling between upholding the law to jail criminals, and giving in to his darker vengeful side willing to kill crooks. His two-faced appearance is an apt metaphor for this struggle. Dark Victory also includes the original story of Dick Grayson, the first Robin. He is the young son of trapeze artists, and when his parents high-wire act is sabotaged, he becomes an orphan just like Bruce Wayne. As a result, Bruce takes pity on him and lets him stay at Wayne Manor. The young boy is upset and confused, as Bruce is distant and unattentive, but when Dick encounters Batman, he vows to find his parents’ killers. True to its crime noir roots, Dark Victory does not reveal the mystery of the Hangman killings until many red herring have been thrown the reader’s way, and even when you think you’re onto the real killer, it’s more complicated than that. We share the struggle of Batman, Jim Gordon, even the villains themselves. So when the final reveal comes, it’s quite a surprise. In my opinion, Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale have produced a classic tale of crime and its legacy on all those involved, one that rivals any mafia film. It’s up to you to give it a try for yourself.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andy 117

    The Long Halloween was, despite its villain-a-month hook, a tight, compact murder mystery at its core. With mob drama and crime procedural being flanked by Batman fighting the more recognizable of his (and Green Lantern's, I guess) rogues gallery, the result was a well-written, tightly-wound whodunnit with just enough Batman flavour to justify being a Batman book. As a sort of sequel to Year One, it works perfectly as far as the tone goes. But the scope, as with Year One, was decidedly limited. L The Long Halloween was, despite its villain-a-month hook, a tight, compact murder mystery at its core. With mob drama and crime procedural being flanked by Batman fighting the more recognizable of his (and Green Lantern's, I guess) rogues gallery, the result was a well-written, tightly-wound whodunnit with just enough Batman flavour to justify being a Batman book. As a sort of sequel to Year One, it works perfectly as far as the tone goes. But the scope, as with Year One, was decidedly limited. Long Halloween sowed the seeds for the more outlandish, supervillain-laden adventures that Batman is most well-known for - and in Dark Victory, those seeds are allowed to grow. Quite feverishly, in fact. With the remnants of Gotham's mob families either swept away or otherwise incapacitated, it's time for the "Freaks" - what "The Boss" Falcone refers to costumed criminals, like Joker, Riddler, Scarecrow, Penguin, and the newly-minted Two-Face, as - to start running the show. There's still a quite complicated murder-mystery here - once more based around major holidays being used as the key dates for a series of vicious serial killings. There's still mob drama and intrigue. But more and more, even with the villain-a-month gimmick thrown away for a more typical year-spanning detective story, traditional Batman action creeps in. Honestly, it may have seen that Dark Victory actually appeals to me more than Long Halloween. Jeph Loeb sure does understand Batman, doesn't he? I think he "gets" the idea that Batman is a fallible, broken man, in a fallible, broken world. I'm pretty sure he understands that it is Batman's tragedy that is at the core of his being. And yet, he's not unwilling to show that Batman is indeed an unrivaled tactician, escape artist, and hand-to-hand fighter. It's pretty much the sweet spot for straddling the line between "broken little man" and "demigod in a cape" that I like out of a Batman/Bruce Wayne characterization, so that's a huge boon. I think it helps a lot, too, that the plot tends to center around - at least on Batman's end - him admitting that he made a pretty huge mistake. The murder mystery this time revolves around the serial killings of the "Hang Man". Cops and ex-cops are all being hung by the neck on major holidays, with notes pinned to their bodies - games of hangman, partially solved. As the now Commissioner Gordon, an assembled crack team of top-ranking detectives, Batman, and the new District Attorney all race to find the true identity of the Hang Man, there's trouble behind the scenes of the Falcone and the Maroni crime families; once enemies, the "Freak" element of Gotham has both of them rightly scared, and an uneasy alliance of sorts is formed to, basically, save themselves from extinction. Loeb writes a stellar script, but it's his collaboration with Tim Sale that truly seals the deal here. My god, that man can draw. The way he portrays Gotham is phenomenal - it is a city I can truly believe is inhabited by both costumed madmen and more tame, "realistic" organized crime families. Though, it is the more fantastic elements that draw me in to his designs. In particular, his depiction of Joker is terrifying. Moreso than even in Long Halloween, Joker seems to be a kind of elongated man, with a contorted, twisting skeleton, and a jaw that both extends longer than the entire rest of his head, and (seemingly) houses more human teeth than three healthy men. I think it's particularly unnerving considering Joker is not a main player here, so his manic visage appears seemingly at random; an unhinged maniac stumbling valiantly on-stage while an unrelated play is currently in session. As with Long Halloween, this is a long read - fourteen issues! - but I think it's much easier to digest than before. The mystery isn't quite as uniquely dense, and hasn't quite as many threads as previous (though there are many, from Selina Kyle/Catwoman's relationship to Bruce Wayne, the Holiday Killer's sentencing and ultimate fate, and a lot - a LOT - of mob conspiracy), yet a lot the appeal, of course, comes with the tenacity of Gotham's supercriminal element. Some quite memorable moments include Batman threatening Riddler to solve the Hang Man's puzzles (the idea of Batman forcing Riddler to do anything cerebral for him is a concept I'm surprised there's not more of, though Loeb and Sale's Riddler is far more weaselly than some interpretations), Batman's escape from an overzealous SWAT team, and... well, pretty much anything involving Two-Face. Harvey Dent was only made to be Two-Face in The Long Halloween, and he was an essential part of Gordon and Batman's plan for Gotham, so the tragedy of his downfall is so bittersweet you can taste it. And finally, Robin is introduced. I wasn't expecting to like it, but man, Loeb really does manage to write in Dick Grayson in a way that makes the character make sense in regards to this Year One-inspired Gotham City. It isn't perfect - I think it comes across as a little forced, and it never really comes into play until a little late in the story, but it does work remarkably well, and it ties in, at least, to the core conflict in Batman's head - does he need allies? Does Batman work alone, or does he need friends? Can he have friends? It's probably no surprise as to what decision he ends up making, considering the end of this book is sort of set in stone from the outset, but at the same time, the path to making that decision is quite touching - the closest this book has to a heartfelt, "feelgood" moment. Dark Victory is a more than capable follow-up to an esteemed classic, and one I personally would say outranks it in terms of sheer entertainment value. If you've read, and you enjoy, The Long Halloween, there's no reason - none whatsoever! - to not pick this up if you can. It strikes a fantastic balance between being more of the same, and building hugely upon the foundations laid out by its predecessor - the kind of sequel we in the business call "fitting". So, yes. A fitting sequel to The Long Halloween - and if that doesn't work for you, then know it's just damn fantastic in and of itself. Hooray!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cacallahan

    Definitely one of my favorite graphic novels. It's a combination of The Godfather (crime family drama) with Batman, all the classic villains, detective work and the introduction of Robin. This is the sequel to Long Halloween and a major contributor to the recent Batman movies by Nolan. Batman is his classic self with awesome detective skills, a larger than life presence, shadow and stealth, and a certain broken humanity. Yet for all his demands of justice and beat downs and no nonsense there is Definitely one of my favorite graphic novels. It's a combination of The Godfather (crime family drama) with Batman, all the classic villains, detective work and the introduction of Robin. This is the sequel to Long Halloween and a major contributor to the recent Batman movies by Nolan. Batman is his classic self with awesome detective skills, a larger than life presence, shadow and stealth, and a certain broken humanity. Yet for all his demands of justice and beat downs and no nonsense there is a glimmer of hope and light. Some favorite parts include a scene similar to the horse head in the bed from the Godfather. Also Jokers presence and his tiny little "heh" moments just showing his inappropriate laughter and insanity. I liked the fact that Two faces speech bubbles are written with a jagged bold sloppy print which makes his voice sound harsh and gravelly. The monochromatic scenes and limited color palettes were nice too, adding to the tone of the gn. Like I said very good read. Well written story, liked the style and lettering and highly recommend to any Batman fan.

  14. 5 out of 5

    StoryTellerShannon

    Longer review possibly coming later. CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: A minus; STORY/PLOTTING/PANELS: A minus; BATMAN/MYTHOLOGY: A minus; ARTISTIC PRESENTATION: A minus to A; ACTION SCENES: B plus to A minus; WHEN READ: mid November 2013; OVERALL GRADE: B minus to B.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elilith

    Victoria oscura es la inmediata continuación del tomo "El largo Halloween" en éste, Batman y el detective Gordon intentan dar caza al asesino en serie "Festivo", que al igual que Calendarman, aprovecha para matar en fechas señaladas. Después de una larga investigación y un gran plot-twist, consiguen atrapar al asesino. En "Victoria Oscura" ya se sabe quien es festivo, pero un nuevo asesino en serie aparece en Gothan. Coincidiendo también con festividades, asesina a policias corruptos y miembros Victoria oscura es la inmediata continuación del tomo "El largo Halloween" en éste, Batman y el detective Gordon intentan dar caza al asesino en serie "Festivo", que al igual que Calendarman, aprovecha para matar en fechas señaladas. Después de una larga investigación y un gran plot-twist, consiguen atrapar al asesino. En "Victoria Oscura" ya se sabe quien es festivo, pero un nuevo asesino en serie aparece en Gothan. Coincidiendo también con festividades, asesina a policias corruptos y miembros de la familia Falcone ahorcándolos y dejando junto a sus cuerpos una pequeña pista en forma de juego del horcado. No obstante esto no es lo más característico, sino que el papel que usa para plasmar el juego pertece a los archivos clasificados y secretos de Harvey Dent, actualmente conocido como "Dos caras" y en paradero desconocido desde hace un año. ¿Quién será el asesino? ¿Tiene "Dos caras" algo que ver con los asesinatos? En este tomo recopilatorio los personajes me han encantado, al igual que en el tomo anterior, aparece además de Batman y Gordon, los "engendros" o villanos, y he de destacar en especial la nueva aparición de "El pingüino", el cual me gustaría que hubiera tenido un papel un poco más extenso y especial en la tama, pero que me ha hecho especial ilusión que apareciera (por la serie Gotham cof cof). También tienen especial protagonismo en este tomo tanto "Dos caras" como la familia Falcone, a la que se conoce mucho mejor al terminar el tomo. He de decir que este recopilatorio es un punto de inflexión en el universo de Batman, y aunque no puedo decir porqué diré que me ha encnatado la forma en la que Loeb ha llevado el tema y el gran plot-twist que al parecer son una seña de su guión. Pero si algo tengo que reseñar de los personajes de este tomo, es la aparición del pequeño Robin, me ha encantado saber el inicio del pequeño y el por qué de su nombre y aparición en la vida de Batman. Creo que ha jugado un buen papel en la trama y tengo muchas ganas de seguirle en las aventuras del murciélago. Al igual que en el tomo pasado la ambientación, los dibujos, la tintas y el color son simplemente sublimes. Tim Sale sabe cómo jugar con las sombras y los colores y de vez en cuando nos regala dos páginas completas de pura lucha, color y contraste de negros. Lo que creo que va perfecto para el mundo corrupto y de decadencia en el que está sumido Gotham. La trama está muy bien llevada. Por un lado tenemos al igual que en "El largo Halloween" la principal basada en los asesinatos del Ahorcado y su búsqueda en toda Gotham por parte de Jim Gordon y su épico y también de Batman. Además, se plantean varias subtramas cómo la de la corrupción de los Falcone y la lucha por el poder total de los negocios truculentos de Gotham, la relación de Catwoman con la familia Falcone, la fuga de Arkam de todos los engendros o villanos y su relación entre ellos, con el Ahorcado y con "Dos caras" y finalmente la del pequeño Robin y de cómo formará poco a poco parte de la vida de Bruce Wayne. Todas se mezclan de una manera muy ingeniosa, lo que hace que el cómic sea muy adictivo e interesante. Al igual que "El largo halloween" no puedo dejar de recomendar estos tomos tanto para amantes del mundo del cómic tanto a los que simplemente les guste Batman y quieran saber más de su historia.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mizuki

    Batman: Dark Victory continues the story of The Long Halloween, it concludes (view spoiler)[Harvey Dent's transformation into Two-Face, it also concludes Bruce Wayne's ill-fated relationship with Selina Kyle, then it introduces Dick Grayson as the first Robin (hide spoiler)] . The plot and the murder mystery is more neatly and more skillfully written than The Long Halloween ((view spoiler)[ too many Holiday Killers in one book! (hide spoiler)] ), the artwork and the air of the darkly attractive no Batman: Dark Victory continues the story of The Long Halloween, it concludes (view spoiler)[Harvey Dent's transformation into Two-Face, it also concludes Bruce Wayne's ill-fated relationship with Selina Kyle, then it introduces Dick Grayson as the first Robin (hide spoiler)] . The plot and the murder mystery is more neatly and more skillfully written than The Long Halloween ((view spoiler)[ too many Holiday Killers in one book! (hide spoiler)] ), the artwork and the air of the darkly attractive noir continues to be awesome. It literally is one of the best American comics I've ever read. (Link: http://metro.co.uk/2016/03/23/batman-...) Though I must admit as much as I like this volume, I still can see how the story borrowed so heavily from the Hollywood crime-noir e.g. Godfather...*coughs* I mean *coughs* the horse head scene and all those crime families thingy. Book Review: Batman: The Long Halloween (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    Two-face is back, holding court in the sewers because where else is better, all your fave villains are in this, although could have done with a bit more freeze he's awesome. Really liked this one, alfred knows what up he's on point as ever. We get to see lil grayson who is my fave robin although we could have done with a bit more of his story. The artwork has really grown on me i love how they draw joker's huge ass grin, takes up like most of the page, and also how flippin cute is penguin, he's Two-face is back, holding court in the sewers because where else is better, all your fave villains are in this, although could have done with a bit more freeze he's awesome. Really liked this one, alfred knows what up he's on point as ever. We get to see lil grayson who is my fave robin although we could have done with a bit more of his story. The artwork has really grown on me i love how they draw joker's huge ass grin, takes up like most of the page, and also how flippin cute is penguin, he's meant to be feared yet he looks like nibbler from futurama. Dark victory is really similar to the long halloween everything takes place on holidays this time with a game of hangman however unlike the first book the reveal isn't as shocking it doesn't pack the same punch. It is still a good read though and if you liked long halloween then you'll like this one too.

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    This is a sequel to Loeb and Sale's classic The Long Halloween, and I had never read this one. I think it is beautiful artwork by Sale, and the story is lonnnnng and mostly compelling, though there are no real surprises along the way. It is curious why it garnered such high ratings, but maybe it has something to do with the initial expectations of the book when it came out, to such fanfare… I liked it, it's kinda classic Gotham mob Gordon Batman Two Face stuff, far better than the average fare y This is a sequel to Loeb and Sale's classic The Long Halloween, and I had never read this one. I think it is beautiful artwork by Sale, and the story is lonnnnng and mostly compelling, though there are no real surprises along the way. It is curious why it garnered such high ratings, but maybe it has something to do with the initial expectations of the book when it came out, to such fanfare… I liked it, it's kinda classic Gotham mob Gordon Batman Two Face stuff, far better than the average fare you see, though still nothing really all that special to add to the whole long history of Batman...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    The Long Halloween is a great book, but it did leave some loose threads hanging. It was probably inevitable that a sequel could come along, so here we have Dark Victory. The writing is pretty solid, but it's a little derivative of Long Halloween at times. The stories mirror each other too much for me. The best part is the introduction of Robin, done so many times over, but handled really well here. It is a good read, but it could have been better.

  20. 5 out of 5

    autumn

    a weird retreading of the exact same ground as 'the long halloween' (to which this is a sequel). literally nothing of note happens in the first 8 issues (someone is murdered on a holiday, batman and gordon are stumped, repeat), but issues 9-13 are pretty neat, including the introduction of robin! although wholly unconnected to the rest of the arc, the bits with robin are very sweet. the rogues gallery stuff, the reveal of the killer, and the coloring are really cool as well! if you're going to r a weird retreading of the exact same ground as 'the long halloween' (to which this is a sequel). literally nothing of note happens in the first 8 issues (someone is murdered on a holiday, batman and gordon are stumped, repeat), but issues 9-13 are pretty neat, including the introduction of robin! although wholly unconnected to the rest of the arc, the bits with robin are very sweet. the rogues gallery stuff, the reveal of the killer, and the coloring are really cool as well! if you're going to read this one, don't bother lugging through the first 8 issues of garbage - skip right ahead to 9 (i can't imagine you'd really miss anything, especially if you've read the long halloween)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    Dark Victory is a satisfying follow-up to The Long Halloween, both in terms of plot and art style. Even if it were a crime novel featuring a wealthy detective and his interaction with criminals, mobsters, and the local police force, it would still be thoroughly enjoyable to read. (The fact that said detective is Batman is just icing on the cake.) As in Long Halloween, there is a string of murders taking place on significant days during one year. The difference is that the victims are members of Dark Victory is a satisfying follow-up to The Long Halloween, both in terms of plot and art style. Even if it were a crime novel featuring a wealthy detective and his interaction with criminals, mobsters, and the local police force, it would still be thoroughly enjoyable to read. (The fact that said detective is Batman is just icing on the cake.) As in Long Halloween, there is a string of murders taking place on significant days during one year. The difference is that the victims are members of the police force with ties to former DA Harvey Dent: each one is found hanged by the neck, with a different game of Hangman attached to their body. What saved this from seeming repetitive to me is that Batman, Commissioner Gordon, and Harvey himself all acknowledge the similarity to the previous book's Holiday Killings while focusing on the more important questions: What would someone gain by repeating the theme of the murders? What motives drive the new string of crimes? This book also sees the introduction of a young orphaned boy named Dick Grayson, whose inclusion brings a much-needed fresh perspective to Batman's investigation. Additionally, Batman must rely on assistance from Catwoman and Harvey Dent himself in order to solve the case. My favorite versions of Batman are the ones which are human and fallible: Brilliant beyond question, but imperfect, and incapable of answering every question on his own. It's far more interesting to have characters which need one another rather than operating in complete solitude. The art in every panel is exactly as bright or near-monochrome as it needs to be, complementing the script so that a total story is told without unnecessary exposition or dialogue. The character designs are generally great, though there are occasional forays into expressionism--the Joker's design in particular--which were a little off-putting for me. Luckily, they were rare exceptions rather than the rule.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jays

    The follow up to Loeb and Sale's previous hit story, The Long Halloween, Dark Victory picks up one year after the events of the earlier story. If you liked The Long Halloween's focus on a variety of characters and Gotham itself, this is a perfect follow up for you. Let's be honest, Jeph Loeb is not writing Shakespeare. That said, Dark Victory is pretty frickin' Shakespearean. The same emphasis on a variety of characters struggling against fate, destiny, responsibility and all the rest elevate th The follow up to Loeb and Sale's previous hit story, The Long Halloween, Dark Victory picks up one year after the events of the earlier story. If you liked The Long Halloween's focus on a variety of characters and Gotham itself, this is a perfect follow up for you. Let's be honest, Jeph Loeb is not writing Shakespeare. That said, Dark Victory is pretty frickin' Shakespearean. The same emphasis on a variety of characters struggling against fate, destiny, responsibility and all the rest elevate this far above a simple comic book story. As with The Long Halloween, the thematic serial killer trope is used again and once again serves more as the macguffin for telling a story about Gotham City than it is for any real interest in who is killing all these people. While none of Christopher Nolan's Batman movies specifically use this as a source, it very much fits into that world. Batman is presented as realistically as possible and the emphasis is much more on his place in Gotham City and how a major, large, corrupt city functions.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alayne

    Estuvo muy bueno, aunque se me hizo bastante largo en un principio. Después engancha y me gustó el final y al resolución. Además, aparece Dick Grayson, y no había leído hasta ahora ningún cómic de Batman con él. Bastante recomendable si te gusta el super héroe y los policiales (y si te gustó El Largo Halloween).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pablo Fern�ndez

    Grandísimo cómic. Batman nos recuerda su verdadero yo y nos sumerge en una historia profunda y oscura en las entrañas de una lucha por la amistad, y la justicia.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scott S.

    The follow-up to Batman: The Long Halloween pales in comparison to its forerunner. It started to feel rushed and then muddled towards the finale. Also, the nods towards Puzo's / Coppola's The Godfather are at times laid on a little thick. However, despite that criticism it was still a reasonably good Batman book. The scenes with Commissioner Gordon (who has the largest supporting role), the introduction Dick Grayson / 'Robin,' and the wisdom of Alfred were definite assets to this collection.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a good continuation (maybe not great) of "The Long Halloween." I am so impressed with Tim Sale's artwork, which pleasantly reminds me of the Animated Series mixed with Christopher Nolan intensity, leaning toward a mostly realistic stylization (Joker aside, not in love with that depiction), although occasionally Batman was as large as Solomon Grundy who is like ten feet tall. I like the dialog overall, although as some reviewers have pointed out it does seem to borrow heavily from mafia f This is a good continuation (maybe not great) of "The Long Halloween." I am so impressed with Tim Sale's artwork, which pleasantly reminds me of the Animated Series mixed with Christopher Nolan intensity, leaning toward a mostly realistic stylization (Joker aside, not in love with that depiction), although occasionally Batman was as large as Solomon Grundy who is like ten feet tall. I like the dialog overall, although as some reviewers have pointed out it does seem to borrow heavily from mafia film stereotypes for the Italian characters (and story for the first book a la Godfather), which is a little tiresome, but that's kind of how stereotypes work. Clearly Jeph Loeb either can't write original mafia characters, doesn't care, or it's just easier to steal them. But it didn't really bother me all that much, those characters were flat and supportive anyway, so what do you expect? I think the rest of the dialog is well written. The greater question of course is the story and how it measures up. Like "Long Halloween" I was a little overwhelmed with the giant cast of characters, possible suspects, and many plots and subplots. I was also surprised/disappointed that the story revolved around another serial killer who kills on holidays. But wait, not that Holiday. Because Alberto Falcone is locked up and Harvey Dent is living in the sewers (but neither of these alibis really clears either of them, does it?). So another Holiday? Yes, the cleverly named Hang Man, but instead of mafia figures it's cops that are being targeted. Not sure how I feel about this...the mystery kept me reading to find out, but the story being centered on a holiday serial killer just felt exactly like the first book. Then there's the issue, like in the first book, of Hang Man's real identity. (view spoiler)[If Hang Man is Sofia Falcone, which Loeb purports her to be, then she is seeking revenge upon Dent for killing her family members and mafia figures in the first book. (hide spoiler)] There's also the issue of Sofia's condition, bald, scarred, wheelchair-bound, which I can't remember how that happened...police probably, and Catwoman was involved. But didn't Alberto also kill some of those people? Who killed who exactly? I don't think we ever find out, so the logic/premise for Sofia killing all these cops is a bit blurry. And who is she anyway, that she can overpower all of these highly trained police officers? Yeah she's "gigantic," but come on, she's a thug at best. I guess I have trouble knowing who this story is actually about. James Gordon and Batman would be my guess, because that's usually how it works, but the plot doesn't revolve around them. Don't even ask me who's the protagonist and antagonist. No one seems to change except District Attorney Porter, a minor character, and maybe, maybe Batman because he takes in Robin, but that could easily be refuted (he feels obligated, or Alfred is actually taking care of him). Would that make Dent the antagonist? Who knows. An entertaining read, great art, but like most hero stories the premise is a bit implausible and repeats itself from book one, and the writing could stand "some" improvement. But still a thousand times better than any Frank Miller Batman.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Batman: Dark Victory, the direct sequel to Batman: The Long Halloween, is not nearly as good as its predecessor. The problem is that it tries to do too much. The second similar serial killer story, the Dick Grayson/Robin story, the Batman/Catwoman story, and the freak villains finally uniting all could have worked, separately. Most of them probably could have been fit into Dark Victory successfully. But not all of them, all at once, and certainly not in a shorter space than The Long Halloween was Batman: Dark Victory, the direct sequel to Batman: The Long Halloween, is not nearly as good as its predecessor. The problem is that it tries to do too much. The second similar serial killer story, the Dick Grayson/Robin story, the Batman/Catwoman story, and the freak villains finally uniting all could have worked, separately. Most of them probably could have been fit into Dark Victory successfully. But not all of them, all at once, and certainly not in a shorter space than The Long Halloween was given. The storyline of Dark Victory was convoluted, parts of it were rushed, poorly explained, or left unresolved. For example, the Batman and Robin origin is too rushed to be believable, Two-Face bringing together the freak villains was glossed over so quickly it seemed like an afterthought, and the Batman and Catwoman subplot remained completely unresolved at that end. Even the artwork seemed to take a small step back from The Long Halloween. All of that being said, it was still well worth reading -- but mostly for those that have already read and enjoyed Batman: The Long Halloween.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Batman Dark Victory has way so many things going on that Batman has to become an overly talkative narrator. It revolves around a convoluted story of police murders. These serial killings are uninspired with murder clues I didn't even bother to look at again (and I'm not even comparing this to The Long Halloween). The Robin origin story is forced and Dick is a bit of a deus ex machina simply because the story is nearing its conclusion. I'm okay with Dark Victory having a similar story with The Lon Batman Dark Victory has way so many things going on that Batman has to become an overly talkative narrator. It revolves around a convoluted story of police murders. These serial killings are uninspired with murder clues I didn't even bother to look at again (and I'm not even comparing this to The Long Halloween). The Robin origin story is forced and Dick is a bit of a deus ex machina simply because the story is nearing its conclusion. I'm okay with Dark Victory having a similar story with The Long Halloween, but the former is just terrible.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    This was my 2nd reading of 'Dark Victory'. An early story in the Batman world, and a very good one. Follows the 'Long Halloween' storyline. Someone is targeting cops/gangsters and killing them. Batman has to work hard to figure out who, all while the whole villains gallery has been broken out of Arkham. Great stuff, also the first appearance of Dick Grayson.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Snehith Devalapalli

    The story is set right after the events of The Long Halloween. Which I loved. Robin is introduced here and was smoothly done. Two-face is a perfect antagonist as always. As usual the suspense was well maintained till the end. The twist was worth the wait. The relationship between Bruce and Alfred is beyond mothership.

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