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Batman: Anno uno PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Batman: Anno uno
Author: Frank Miller
Publisher: Published April 24th 2008 by Planeta DeAgostini (first published February 1st 1987)
ISBN: 9788467452655
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Nel 1986, Frank Miller e David Mazzucchelli realizzarono questa travolgente riscrittura delle origini di Batman: chi è e come lo è diventato. Scritto subito dopo Il Ritorno del Cavaliere Oscuro, il racconto distopico sugli ultimi giorni di Batman, Anno Uno costruisce una nuova versione di un personaggio leggendario.

30 review for Batman: Anno uno

  1. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    This is one of those books that's been absorbed into the public consciousness so fully that, reading it now, it can be hard to see what was revolutionary about it. This book has come to define the way we think of Batman today and was influential on the darker, grittier cape comics of the eighties and early nineties. But it is also instrumental in introducing what made that period of comics so ridiculous. It's been praised for its gritty realism, but like any Miller book, it's more sensationlist t This is one of those books that's been absorbed into the public consciousness so fully that, reading it now, it can be hard to see what was revolutionary about it. This book has come to define the way we think of Batman today and was influential on the darker, grittier cape comics of the eighties and early nineties. But it is also instrumental in introducing what made that period of comics so ridiculous. It's been praised for its gritty realism, but like any Miller book, it's more sensationlist than realist: a hard-boiled patina over an idealized superhero core. Sure, Batman screws things up a few times in this, and seems to get shot, beaten, and burned in every attempt to stop a crime, but these are primarily to push the melodrama, not to enforce realism. We'll get a classic Miller line about a bullet's 'searing-hot flash of metal numbing my leg', but then Batman gets up, runs around, kicks through a brick wall, and at one point, takes a ski vacation to rehabilitate. The wounds aren't there to make Batman human, they're to make him totally manly and awesome. It's an eighties action movie where our hero gets shot in the shoulder just so he can wrap it up, grit his teeth, and take out some armed men with karate. But Miller's a good writer. He has a strong voice and a compelling sense of pacing, and if this story brings realism to Batman, it's in the small human moments, particularly Gordon's story, though he scraps like a Sin City tough, too, quipping to himself "it's been years since I had to take out a Green Beret". The way Batman takes death-defying risks every few pages isn't a sign of greater maturity or realism, it's just a switch to a different kind of ridiculous, epic melodrama. Sure, it's much more bloody and grim, but if adding blood and sex to a story was all it took to write mature, realistic stories, film critics would spend their careers analyzing slasher movies. Of course, it wouldn't be a Frank Miller story without whores, which is where we get to his rewrite of Catwoman: she's a leather-clad prostitute with a child prostitute sidekick. She doesn't have as much character as the men, in fact Gordon's monologues run right over her scenes, denying us insight. But even with the mandatory prostitutes and Die Hard injuries, it's a fun book, with character and story and some well-crafted dialogue. More than that, it's a vision of how to create male fantasies without catering to preteen boys. It forms a part of that influential, genre-shifting period defined by 'Wathcmen' and it stands as an integral part of the modern Batman character. My Suggested Readings in Comics

  2. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    To me, Batman is kinda like Pizza. By which I mean that even bad pizza is still pretty good. But for me, the best Batman is written by Miller. Maybe it's because I like his writing style, or maybe it's because his fairly dark writing style really suits Batman. Or it could just be that the very first comic I read as adult was Dark Night Returns. That's the comic that made me realize that comics weren't just a bunch of silly bullshit stories for kids. Whatever the reason, this comic is in that fin To me, Batman is kinda like Pizza. By which I mean that even bad pizza is still pretty good. But for me, the best Batman is written by Miller. Maybe it's because I like his writing style, or maybe it's because his fairly dark writing style really suits Batman. Or it could just be that the very first comic I read as adult was Dark Night Returns. That's the comic that made me realize that comics weren't just a bunch of silly bullshit stories for kids. Whatever the reason, this comic is in that fine Frank Miller style. Showing Batman and Gordon at the beginning of their lives. Both of them making mistakes. Both of them learning about their city. Both of them paying for their mistakes.... Yeah. If you're into Batman and you haven't read this one, you're missing out. You should try it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    I would have loved it more if graphics were the work of nowadays' technology. I am planning to read my favourite superheros' origin. And I have started with my absolute-favourite superhero, Batman. I knew about his origin before. But reading it was a good experience also. There was also an appearance of Catwoman a.k.a Selina. She didn't appear much. There was just a brief intro of how she became Catwoman. She seemed to me an anti-batman. Lt. Gordon was a good character. But his affair with Sarah I would have loved it more if graphics were the work of nowadays' technology. I am planning to read my favourite superheros' origin. And I have started with my absolute-favourite superhero, Batman. I knew about his origin before. But reading it was a good experience also. There was also an appearance of Catwoman a.k.a Selina. She didn't appear much. There was just a brief intro of how she became Catwoman. She seemed to me an anti-batman. Lt. Gordon was a good character. But his affair with Sarah seemed pretty much a filler. I highly recommend this comic if you wanna know how Batman came into being. I loved this comic. 2 December, 2017

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When James Gordon joined the Gotham City Police Department, he had no idea of the cesspool of corruption it was. Fortunately, there are a few good cops left in Gotham and Gotham has a fledgling protector of its own, Batman! I'm three decades late to the party but I'm glad I showed up. Batman: Year One has been hyped as one of the definitive Batman stories ever since it was published. Is it? No. It's the definitive James Gordon story and it's spectacular! Batman: Year One is told from the point of v When James Gordon joined the Gotham City Police Department, he had no idea of the cesspool of corruption it was. Fortunately, there are a few good cops left in Gotham and Gotham has a fledgling protector of its own, Batman! I'm three decades late to the party but I'm glad I showed up. Batman: Year One has been hyped as one of the definitive Batman stories ever since it was published. Is it? No. It's the definitive James Gordon story and it's spectacular! Batman: Year One is told from the point of view of James Gordon, the man who would later be Commissioner Gordon. This Jim Gordon isn't the buffoonish commissioner of Batman '66 either. He's a good cop and a good man, surrounded by bad cops and bad men in the worst city in America. And there's this vigilante running around in a bat suit who may or may not be Bruce Wayne, millionaire playboy who recently returned to Gotham after thirteen years abroad... So fucking good. David Mazzucchelli's art had to be an inspiration for the feel of Gotham Central decades later. The gloomy, Mignola-esque feel is perfect for this gritty tale. Frank Miller was yet to enter his prime and his writing was pretty crisp, although I wasn't crazy about him making Catwoman a sex worker. The bad guys are the worst kind, corrupt men in positions of power. I couldn't wait for Gordon and Batman to take them down. While this book was one of the ones that ushered in the era of the grim and gritty super hero, it feels authentic here and isn't grim for the sake of being grim like a lot of books that came after. Whole swathes of this book used in the Nolan trilogy. Much like the Nolan movies, this would have been a great comic even without Batman in it. Great stuff. Batman: Year's One is one book that definitely lived up to the hype and deserves its reputation. If you're only going to read one Batman comic in your entire life, you could do a lot worse than this one. Five out of five stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "Gotham City. Maybe it's all I deserve, now. Maybe it's just my time in Hell." One of my absolute favorite Batman comics ever. It's quiet, subtle, realistic, noir. This is probably the most accessible Batman comic ever and where new readers should start, because while The Dark Knight Returns is Batman's omega, Batman Year One is his alpha. David Mazzucchelli is sublime. He illustrates with pure balance: minimal while detailed, bright yet dark, bold yet subtle. His characters are incredibly emotiv "Gotham City. Maybe it's all I deserve, now. Maybe it's just my time in Hell." One of my absolute favorite Batman comics ever. It's quiet, subtle, realistic, noir. This is probably the most accessible Batman comic ever and where new readers should start, because while The Dark Knight Returns is Batman's omega, Batman Year One is his alpha. David Mazzucchelli is sublime. He illustrates with pure balance: minimal while detailed, bright yet dark, bold yet subtle. His characters are incredibly emotive, his splash pages and large panels iconic. This wouldn't be the same, especially with Miller's illustrations, if Mazzucchelli hadn't illustrated. This is a stylized and expanded origin story, not a retelling, as Dennis O'Neil tells us in the introduction. Jim Gordon arrives in Gotham, while twenty-five year old Bruce Wayne returns after being abroad. Harvey Dent leads a crusade, Commissioner Loeb and Detective Flass corrupt, and Selina Kyle steals as Catwoman. There's plenty to see from a wide array of characters. Interestingly, this isn't your typical Batman versus Villains book. But rather Batman and Jim Gordon versus Gotham. Apart from Geoff Johns' Batman Earth One, this is one of the rare stories where Batman is an amateur. Initially without a disguise, rules or purpose. He gets hurt and shot. Soon realizing fear is the element he lacks and must instill in his enemies. There's one particular scene which shows Bruce in an armchair in his study in moonlight, with a bat breaking through the window. Essentially the pivotal scene where he decides to become Batman. I've seen this in several other comics, including Snyder's and Morrison's Batman runs. So it's great to know where it comes from, assuming this scene isn't referencing some other Silver or Golden Age comic I haven't yet read. This is legendary. It's a small book, a short story. There's no Rogue Gallery, no nuclear missiles, no huge international conspiracies. No time travel or multiverse. Just noble Batman, a hard boiled Jim Gordon, and Gotham on a rainy night.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    This was good. I see a lot that Tim Burton pulled in for the '89 Batman movie. This is also strangely centered on Gordon and his life. Usually Gordon is not a focus like here. There are some interesting and different ideas about the origin story, but I guess that is from someone who is going backwards and has seen the movies after this was written. The art is gritty, but not as dark as it gets. The story is sound and Batman has a realism here that the new DC comics have lost trying to make him s This was good. I see a lot that Tim Burton pulled in for the '89 Batman movie. This is also strangely centered on Gordon and his life. Usually Gordon is not a focus like here. There are some interesting and different ideas about the origin story, but I guess that is from someone who is going backwards and has seen the movies after this was written. The art is gritty, but not as dark as it gets. The story is sound and Batman has a realism here that the new DC comics have lost trying to make him so ultra dark. It was a good read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Meh. It was alright. It was sort of cool to see things from Gordon's perspective. I still would have liked to see a little more Bruce. I don't feel like I gained any new insight into his origins or his character. It wasn't awful, I was just hoping for more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    You know the classics of literature - War and Peace, Crime and Punishment, Middlemarch? There are aspects to them to appreciate and patient readers can be rewarded greatly with those books. But let's be honest - most of us view classics as a bit of a chore. But what about classic comics? Kind of the same thing, but not for so many. Some classic comics, Marvel and DC especially, are tough to read because the stories from the 40s and 50s are so badly written and cheesy, and the art is hit or miss, You know the classics of literature - War and Peace, Crime and Punishment, Middlemarch? There are aspects to them to appreciate and patient readers can be rewarded greatly with those books. But let's be honest - most of us view classics as a bit of a chore. But what about classic comics? Kind of the same thing, but not for so many. Some classic comics, Marvel and DC especially, are tough to read because the stories from the 40s and 50s are so badly written and cheesy, and the art is hit or miss, though most of them possess a guileless charm to them that makes them easier to stomach. When it comes to comics, no character stands taller than Batman, and no Batman book has more of a reputation than Year One. Is it a chore to read? No. Has it aged poorly? Not even a bit. Does it deserve it's title as a true bona fide classic? (Austin Powers voice) Yeah, baby! Year One is Frank Miller and David Mazzuchelli's retelling of Batman's origin and through their retelling they set the tone and standard for all other Batman books that followed. A 25 year old Bruce Wayne returns to a nightmarish Gotham City riddled with crime at the same time as an older but still young James Gordon, recently transferred to the GCPD and entering Gotham City for the first time. Both men have a clear mission: to clean up the streets of crime and make Gotham habitable for decent, hardworking folks. Some readers have wondered why Gordon gets as much space - maybe more - as Bruce Wayne in this book and the answer is simple: they're both two sides of the same coin. The very first Batman story opens with Bruce and Jim sitting, talking about crime, and Jim is arguably Batman's best friend. Batman's origin would tie in with Gordon's as their lives will be linked forever once they dig their heels in and bring justice to Gotham. It's been a few years since I read Year One and I really hoped it would hold up - and it did. Whatever your feelings are about Frank Miller today (and he has unfortunately gone from genius writer to crackpot old man), his work in the 80s ranks amongst the best the comics medium has ever produced, and Year One is arguably the pinnacle of that work. He went from telling the last Batman story ever with The Dark Knight Returns to, with his next book, going back to the very beginning and telling the first Batman story ever - and both are masterpieces. In just four issues, we see Bruce get into his first fight as an unmasked vigilante, to realising he must don a disguise, to the famous "Yes. Father. I will become a bat" scene, to his fledgling first missions to clear up corrupt police, mob bosses, and the iconic dinner party scene where he appears to Gotham's most powerful and evil to inform them they have eaten well but from now on none of them are safe. And the scene when Batman takes down the SWAT team? Brilliant. Still tense, exciting, and fantastic to read. It's a testament to Miller's writing that he's able to take Gordon, who for many is little more than a one-note background character, and makes you care about him as much as you do Batman. Gordon becomes Gotham's first non-corrupt officer, fighting his own colleagues (literally and figuratively) to uphold the law and become better than the criminals they chase, while his wife is pregnant with James Jr. (see Batman: The Black Mirror for what happened to James Jr. when he grew up) and the stresses of the job leading to him make some bad decisions. We also meet Selina Kyle for the first time, working as a dominatrix in Gotham's red light district, as she decides to become her own costumed character, Catwoman, after first seeing Batman. Mazzuchelli's art in this book is flawless but my one criticism of the book is Catwoman's outfit - I hate the whiskers and tail! What use are either to a cat burglar? And it just looks stupid. Anyway, Year One is a must-read for all Batman fans - as if you didn't already know! Everyone who has even a cursory knowledge of Batman comics knows Year One is one of the first to read. And it is - but it's also one to re-read and come back to again and again because there are a LOT of Batman books, but few of such high quality as Year One. A great beginning for the Dark Knight and the man who would be Commissioner. Just don't read Year Two!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    I've never been much of a super hero fan. And to me, Batman will always be Adam West's campy TV show of my youth. Bap! Zammm! Kapow! BUT...there's something about beginnings that appeals to me. I like watching a guy discovering and honing his powers. I'm remembering my favorite parts of two super hero movies I was forced to sit through - Spiderman on a rooftop, trying to figure out how to get his web thingamajig to work - "Um, Shazam?" and Iron Man crashing through his grand piano. Once they've g I've never been much of a super hero fan. And to me, Batman will always be Adam West's campy TV show of my youth. Bap! Zammm! Kapow! BUT...there's something about beginnings that appeals to me. I like watching a guy discovering and honing his powers. I'm remembering my favorite parts of two super hero movies I was forced to sit through - Spiderman on a rooftop, trying to figure out how to get his web thingamajig to work - "Um, Shazam?" and Iron Man crashing through his grand piano. Once they've got the kinks worked out, it basically becomes a guy in a costume fighting another guy in a costume and I quickly lose interest. This book covers the early years of not just Batman, but Cat Woman and James "Someday He'll Be Commissioner" Gordon as well. Gotham City is a sin-infested cesspool with enough vice and corruption to keep these three in business for years to come. I might hang around for a bit, even if the sound effects are not like I remember. Glurpp! Thwack! Flrbbbbb!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    I received this one as a birthday present around five months back and never got round to reading this. In fact, it has been almost a decade since I last picked up a comic book. Somewhere around moving from one place to another, sorting life after graduation, this one found itself buried and waiting. Two episodes of the new Flash down and one of the Arrow, then a few of The Walking Dead, and I hate this waiting. I prefer my comic manna to be delivered in a line, to be downed one after the other i I received this one as a birthday present around five months back and never got round to reading this. In fact, it has been almost a decade since I last picked up a comic book. Somewhere around moving from one place to another, sorting life after graduation, this one found itself buried and waiting. Two episodes of the new Flash down and one of the Arrow, then a few of The Walking Dead, and I hate this waiting. I prefer my comic manna to be delivered in a line, to be downed one after the other in quick intense sessions. That left me elbow deep in the still unopened boxes occupying almost half my room (procrastinator alert!) and I finally fished this one out . I took the picture below for my Instagram account months earlier. This is a perfect introduction to the character of Batman and while I say that I realise that there probably isn’t anyone who requires an introduction to this character. But this book is full of nifty little titbits. The story traces from the beginnings of the dark hero. As the title suggests it begins the origin of batman, the origins which fork into two different timelines. A more gritty and acidic side to the hero as foreseen by Frank Miller and then, the more famous generic doppelganger. The comic is a character study, and weirdly as I have come to associate with Miller, not a study of our Knight himself, but rather of the Police Commissioner Gordon who is then Lieutenant Gordon. Whereas the bat inspires fear, Gordon lends a more relatable and humane taste to the story. It is weird, because it being a story of the origin of Batman, would treat him more as a garnish, but it works. Those familiar with the Tv series Gotham, could find this in the same alley. A corrupt city decaying and retching from its own stench, and an even more corrupt police force and our one man army fighting to survive against it and overcome the odds. This is Gordon. But he isn’t heroism personified. He is a deeply flawed character and as often found battling against himself as he is found avenging the city. Contrary to the Tv, the Bat isn’t a kid here. He is grown up and is the more shadowy figure who serves the vigilante angle, a little less cocksure of himself, and sometimes stumbling on his feet. He has just returned from training and we get to see him on his first night out as a vigilante. He is not yet a bat. The inspiration is yet to strike him. And he fumbles. Here we are introduced to the hero who is yet in the making and is a long long way to being the person who will eventually face Ra’s al Ghul or even Bane. Catwoman makes an appearance here as a prostitute, although her story is redefined in a later issue as a thief who pretends to be a prostitute in order to steal. As far as covers for crime go, I am not sure I follow this one as thoroughly. A classic story with a very distinct goth feel. This one was reminiscent of the old superhero movies. The artwork left a lot to be desired. And I missed the emotional connection with this. There was no black hole left behind after the final page was turned. It was power packed but not packed enough. Still, it was an enjoyable read and should definitely be counted as a must read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    Year One is the Batman origin that everyone currently knows. It is the origin story that until Frank Miller wrote it, did not exist. And therefore, while the book may not appear ground-breaking currently; at its time of publication it was incredibly fresh. It was the gritty, revenge seeking origin story of Bruce Wayne that audiences wanted. However, in all honesty Bruce Wayne cannot be called the protagonist in this novel. As I recently read: the protagonist is the character which shows change an Year One is the Batman origin that everyone currently knows. It is the origin story that until Frank Miller wrote it, did not exist. And therefore, while the book may not appear ground-breaking currently; at its time of publication it was incredibly fresh. It was the gritty, revenge seeking origin story of Bruce Wayne that audiences wanted. However, in all honesty Bruce Wayne cannot be called the protagonist in this novel. As I recently read: the protagonist is the character which shows change and development in the novel. And in this novel it is Lieutenant James Gordon who is the protagonist in my eyes. At the beginning of the novel Gordan is a young, almost naive cop, unhardened by the cruelty of Gotham and unprepared for the duties of being one of the few moral men in a city of disrepute. Where on the other hand Batman/Bruce Wayne is the vengeful hero attempting to fight crime, taking bullets and making mistakes all to show (as other reviewers have pointed out) how awesome he is. Frank Miller's work on Batman in general is always solid and reinforces the idea of the gritty and brooding Dark Knight. However, regardless of who writes a Batman story the character is always greater than the individual writer, much like any other great character of fiction. A strong and powerful character may not be as strong in certain author's hands but nothing prevents them from being altered indescribably (otherwise that is not the same character). One may debate whether the newer versions of Doctor Who, Star Trek, Star Wars and so forth are as legitimate or true versions, but they are the same characters regardless. Batman here may be the gritty dark knight (as in The Dark Knight Returns) but that does not destroy the fact that he can be a more comic or noble caped crusader and still be the same character.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Ever since finishing The Caped Crusade I have had a hankering to read one of the iconic Batman stories. As many plaudits as Batman: The Dark Knight Returns has received I was more drawn to this book because it tells the story of Batman's initial forays into vigilante justice (plus I had recently seen Batman v Superman and didn't need to see them fight yet again). While this collection of comics (four to be exact) are titled Batman, this is a story just as much about Jim Gordon (the future commis Ever since finishing The Caped Crusade I have had a hankering to read one of the iconic Batman stories. As many plaudits as Batman: The Dark Knight Returns has received I was more drawn to this book because it tells the story of Batman's initial forays into vigilante justice (plus I had recently seen Batman v Superman and didn't need to see them fight yet again). While this collection of comics (four to be exact) are titled Batman, this is a story just as much about Jim Gordon (the future commissioner and Bat ally). Instead of fighting colorful villains from his rouge's gallery Batman's target in the beginning is vice and corruption, from the junkie mugger on the street up to the very apex of political power in Gotham. Gordon, meanwhile, has moved from Chicago to Gotham under a cloud of police misconduct and is looking for a new start for himself and his pregnant wife. What he finds is a police force riddled with corruption and naked brutality more than willing to use violence and intimidation to keep their own officers in line. I find the story itself quite engaging, especially as we see matters from both Batman's and Gordon's perspective. Even better this isn't the omnipotent bad-ass Batman but a very green, very inexperienced one. He screws up, he makes mistakes, and he learns from them. He faces legitimate threats and rarely comes out unscathed. Gordon, meanwhile, must navigate a corrupt system with little to protect him than the press's adulation of his police heroics. We also get a small peek at Catwoman's origins and a young Harvey Dent. The comic panels are all rather washed out and dark, conveying a very catastrophic and dingy feeling to the streets of Gotham City. Given the subject matter and the state of the city I thought this artistic choice was spot on. This isn't a flashy, bright, septic city of the future like Metropolis but a gritty, crumbling city of Gotham. While the atmosphere is dark the story and content were pretty straight forward, nothing like the ultra gloomy and gratuitously dark stuff we get these days. All in all this was a very enjoyable experience. The pages just flew by while the story explored a fascinating point in a beloved character's history. This is a great starting point for someone interested in getting into Batman comics because it isn't weighed down by decades of canon and backstory.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    I'm not a big fan of superhero origin stories, so I avoided reading Batman: Year One for awhile, but I'm really glad I finally picked it up and gave it a try. This four-issue series totally blew me away. It got to the heart of everything I've always loved about Batman, while giving equal time to Commissioner Gordon (still a lieutenant in Year One). Gordon has always been one of my favorite supporting characters in Batman's world, and I think he rarely gets his due, so it was nice to read a story I'm not a big fan of superhero origin stories, so I avoided reading Batman: Year One for awhile, but I'm really glad I finally picked it up and gave it a try. This four-issue series totally blew me away. It got to the heart of everything I've always loved about Batman, while giving equal time to Commissioner Gordon (still a lieutenant in Year One). Gordon has always been one of my favorite supporting characters in Batman's world, and I think he rarely gets his due, so it was nice to read a story that focused almost as much on him as it did on Bruce Wayne. Frank Miller's storytelling is lean and mean, and avoids the excesses that he frequently indulges in, and never falls into the trap of rote, by-the-numbers plotting that so many origin stories do. The art, by David Mazzucchelli, is gritty and impressionistic without being deliberately abstract or confusing. (Mazzucchelli also wrote an afterword for this volume in the form of a comic strip that is one of the best and wittiest appreciations of Batman's history that I've ever read.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    aria [dear darling reader]

    i can now see why people a lot of people, recommend this book to people who wants to start with batman. . this book is the bomb. i love this. well, i still love zero year. both origin stories have their own strengths and weaknesses, still brilliantly done, nonetheless. full review might come. soon. ----------- i have been planning to read this for a long timejust wasn't able to add it on goodreads because i'm too lazy to add stuff on here because i am a batman beatch fan. highly recommended by a i can now see why people a lot of people, recommend this book to people who wants to start with batman. . this book is the bomb. i love this. well, i still love zero year. both origin stories have their own strengths and weaknesses, still brilliantly done, nonetheless. full review might come. soon. ----------- i have been planning to read this for a long timejust wasn't able to add it on goodreads because i'm too lazy to add stuff on here because i am a batman beatch fan. highly recommended by a friend of mine. i'm scared he'll completely disown me if i don't read this soon asap.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rusty Grey

    4.5 stars We all know why Bruce Wayne became Batman . Or how he became Batman . Frank Miller's Batman Year One is the story of a naïve Batman , when he had just entered this vigilante business . This story belongs to Commissioner Gordon as much as it belongs to Batman . Just as the name suggests , it's their Year One . Frank Miller has done a great job again . There may be a few readers who wouldn't like Miller's style . He uses too many dialogues . Or monologues . But after reading The Dark Kni 4.5 stars We all know why Bruce Wayne became Batman . Or how he became Batman . Frank Miller's Batman Year One is the story of a naïve Batman , when he had just entered this vigilante business . This story belongs to Commissioner Gordon as much as it belongs to Batman . Just as the name suggests , it's their Year One . Frank Miller has done a great job again . There may be a few readers who wouldn't like Miller's style . He uses too many dialogues . Or monologues . But after reading The Dark Knight Returns , I've come to expect this of him . David Mazzucchelli's art compliments Miller's writing nicely . Though it might be hazy at certain places . Overall , Batman Year One is a very good Batman origin story . ------------------------------------ You know who's my favorite superhero ?? And this is his origin story . Though I've seen it's many versions , I had never read it . Batman: Year One is written byFrank Miller , one of few elite comic writers . Please !! Don't disappoint me !! It's been a bad year for me in comics .

  16. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I've got good news and disappointing news. The disappointing news is that this "origin" story is less of a full Batman origin tale and more of a young James Gordon story. But the great news is that it's the best damn Gordon story anyone could ever ask for as he tries to navigate the crime-ridden gutters of his new home, Gotham City.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Batman: Year One: Batman and Jim Gordon's early days in a detective noir thriller Originally posted at Fantasy Literature Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (1986) completely reinvented Batman as angry and bitter older man coming out of retirement to stem a rising tide of crime in Gotham City alongside Police Commissioner Jim Gordon. This was a dark vision of a complex and troubled soul driven to fight crime to avenge his parent’s senseless death, and it resonated with a new generation Batman: Year One: Batman and Jim Gordon's early days in a detective noir thriller Originally posted at Fantasy Literature Frank Miller’s Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (1986) completely reinvented Batman as angry and bitter older man coming out of retirement to stem a rising tide of crime in Gotham City alongside Police Commissioner Jim Gordon. This was a dark vision of a complex and troubled soul driven to fight crime to avenge his parent’s senseless death, and it resonated with a new generation of readers and gained comics greater credibility among mainstream readers. Just one year later Miller produced a four-part story arc called Batman: Year One (1987). Though not as iconic as The Dark Knight Returns, this story of Batman and Jim Gordon’s early days is regarded by many as one of the best Batman stories ever told. Origin stories are very popular in the comics world, and this is one is a finely-nuanced character study of two complex individuals. We all know that Batman’s parents were gunned down by a mugger outside a movie theater when he was a small boy. This traumatic event, along with an underground cave filled with bats and his lonely upbringing in his parents’ palatial and brooding Wayne Manor, led him to become the caped crusader who hunts down criminals in the dead of night. But what did Bruce Wayne do for the 18 years after being orphaned? Would you believe he lived in Europe, learning every form of fighting batman year one 1imaginable, in order to someday avenge his parents’ murders? And that his first fumbling attempts to fight criminals would almost get him killed, again and again, before he settled on a costume to hide his identity and strike fear into his enemies’ hearts. In his early days, Batman gets beat up, stabbed, etc. in the process of trying to help others who don’t realize his intentions. Who would have thought doing good could be so punishing? Batman: Year One really surprised me with how realistic, gritty, and crime noir the storyline was. It’s not well known that Batman was originally a detective, not a superhero. It’s always been a given that Gotham City is a crime-ridden version of New York, filled with hoodlums and thugs in every alley and dark corner. But what I wasn’t prepared for was the level of blatant corruption in the Gotham City police department, which Lieutenant James Gordon encounters on his first day in the force. His partner is a thug named Flass, with Green Beret training, who casually beats up street teens and laughs it off on their first day together. Gordon is then introduced to police commissioner Gillian Loeb, a loathsome and corrupt man who reminds Gordon that loyalty and teamwork (read: don’t rock the boat) are the keys to success on the force. Gordon quickly discovers that most of the cops on the force are on the take, involved in drug trades, shakedowns, kickbacks, and every other form of graft imaginable. This all goes on under the direction of Loeb, and no cop is stupid enough to fight this, except the stubborn Gordon. As a result, he is repeatedly subjected to attacks and beatings by other cops. I’m guessing this aspect of Gotham was not explored in the earlier Batman comics, though I could be wrong. Gordon has heard about the Batman, a strange vigilante preying on small-time criminals between midnight and 4am. The Batman is disrupting the established routine of the crooked cops, so Loeb demands that Gordon take him down. However, as Gordon learns more about Batman’s acts of heroism, he begins to wonder whether Batman really is a menace to society or not. Meanwhile, Batman antagonizes commissioner Loeb past the breaking point, so he sends out a ruthless SWAT team armed with M-16s to hunt down Batman in an abandoned warehouse. Gordon is outside, helpless to prevent orders to kill Batman on sight. This is an extended action sequence that is incredibly cinematic and reminded me of Die Hard, the lone hero fighting against hordes of rivals, except in this case these are cops and Batman doesn’t want to hurt them if possible. But they show no such mercy, dropping explosives on the building. By some miracle, Batman manages to escape despite being shot and hurt, with a burning building collapsing about him. Miller does an excellent job of depicting a police force thoroughly corrupt at every level. I felt like I was watching Al Pacino’s Serpico, Kevin Costner’s Untouchables, or James Ellroy’s L.A. Confidential. And Gordon’s character stands out for his noble refusal to go along with things despite the backlash. However, things are pushed to a breaking point when Loeb has Gordon’s wife and young child kidnapped by goons. Gordon goes into kick-ass mode, fighting back in a white-hot fury. When he tracks down the kidnappers, it is Batman that provides critical assistance at a key moment. So although Gordon does not know Batman’s true identity, he also understands there are good intentions there. It’s clear that they will forge a strange alliance against all the criminals in Gotham City, both inside the police force and on the streets. The recent GOTHAM TV series has really fueled my interest in Batman’s origins. It explores the early years of Bruce Wayne, Jim Gordon and Harvey Dent, as well as many of Batman’s most infamous enemies. It’s hard to imagine a series 20 years ago centering on so many villains, depicting them as often good-intentioned people who went astray due to bad circumstances. We get a glimpse of the early Penguin, Joker, Riddler, Two-Face, Catwoman, Poison Ivy, Falcone, Maroni, Loeb, etc. It’s a fresh angle to the BATMAN story, and one worthy of its own review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    This isn't the first time I read Year One. It's actually one of the only DC books I did read when I was young. However, it's been over ten years and I was like I have to re-read it to see if I still enjoy it. As you can tell with my score, it's pretty obvious. Have you've ever seen Batman Begins? A lot of the one/feel of that movie owes to this. Even basically taking the ending right out of the pages of this book. This is really two stories, two origins, in one. It focuses on Bruce becoming Batm This isn't the first time I read Year One. It's actually one of the only DC books I did read when I was young. However, it's been over ten years and I was like I have to re-read it to see if I still enjoy it. As you can tell with my score, it's pretty obvious. Have you've ever seen Batman Begins? A lot of the one/feel of that movie owes to this. Even basically taking the ending right out of the pages of this book. This is really two stories, two origins, in one. It focuses on Bruce becoming Batman and Gordan becoming Commissioner. You can see how vastly different they are yet how similar they COULD be. It's actually a ballsy move when you title it "Batman" and have Gordan probably have more page time. What I liked: Everything to do with Gordan is great. From him being a honorable cop to a shitty husband. To siding with Batman at times, while challenging his views too. Also gotta love how smart Gordan is and knows who Batman is but that's not important, but more important to keep some hope in Gotham. Bruce origins has been told a million times, but back then, this was pretty great way to get into Batman. What I didn't like: Some of the faces and such a mushy. I also think the Catwoman subplot is really really boring. Overall, it's a perfect comic to jump into and enjoy. It has the Batman tone you've come to love, two well told stories, and solid art most of the time. Sure Catwoman is just a add on but everything else in the book is pretty impressive.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Councillor

    I feel like I'm a horrible person to give a Batman comic such a negative rating, and I urge everyone who happens to read my review not to trust my opinion. You'll probably love it; the artwork is okay and the plot well-developed and fast-paced. I have never been much of a Batman fan; neither have I ever understood the hype surrounding this figure, so I finally wanted to give one of the Batman comics a chance by reading Frank Miller's recounting of Batman's early crime fighting career. I didn't e I feel like I'm a horrible person to give a Batman comic such a negative rating, and I urge everyone who happens to read my review not to trust my opinion. You'll probably love it; the artwork is okay and the plot well-developed and fast-paced. I have never been much of a Batman fan; neither have I ever understood the hype surrounding this figure, so I finally wanted to give one of the Batman comics a chance by reading Frank Miller's recounting of Batman's early crime fighting career. I didn't enjoy reading it at all, but that's only a personal problem I have with it. I mainly missed the psychological depth everyone claimed this comic to have, and I never really caught myself interested in any of the events. But as I said: don't trust me.

  20. 5 out of 5

    أحمد

    In 1986 Frank Miller has given The Dark Knight - and the whole world of graphic novels - a whole new dark dimension, with his legendary "The Dark Knight Returns". The next year he decides to give him a proper beginning. "Batman: Year One" follows the first year of the rise of Batman, Gordon and Harvey Dent, the three knights of Gotham. This approach - and many other themes from this book - are adopted by Christopher Nolan's trilogy. So this is the book where Batman begins, and The Dark Knight ri In 1986 Frank Miller has given The Dark Knight - and the whole world of graphic novels - a whole new dark dimension, with his legendary "The Dark Knight Returns". The next year he decides to give him a proper beginning. "Batman: Year One" follows the first year of the rise of Batman, Gordon and Harvey Dent, the three knights of Gotham. This approach - and many other themes from this book - are adopted by Christopher Nolan's trilogy. So this is the book where Batman begins, and The Dark Knight rises. Ahmad Eddeeb August 2012

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    Batman: Year One follows Jim Gordon as he arrives in Gotham City and makes his way through a police presence rife with corruption. At the same time, a vigilante appears, known as The Batman. Together, yet apart, they aim to purge Gotham of the worst of the scum. Pretty darn old school, it was a nice look into the beginnings of the friendship between the two.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Brief History: To be honest, I have actually first heard about Batman through the 90s cartoon series “Batman: The Animated Series,” which apparently, I have actually had my first exposure to the world of comics through so many animated series throughout the 90s. Since I have been reading a lot of comics lately, especially the “X-Men” comics, I wanted to try a different comic book series and that is where I started reading up on “Batman.” So, the first “Batman” comic I have actually came upon r Brief History: To be honest, I have actually first heard about Batman through the 90s cartoon series “Batman: The Animated Series,” which apparently, I have actually had my first exposure to the world of comics through so many animated series throughout the 90s. Since I have been reading a lot of comics lately, especially the “X-Men” comics, I wanted to try a different comic book series and that is where I started reading up on “Batman.” So, the first “Batman” comic I have actually came upon recently is a little gem that I have just noticed lately and that is “Batman: Year One” by Frank Miller along with artwork by David Mazzucchelli along with coloring by Richmond Lewis. “Batman: Year One” is truly a brilliant comic book that newer fans of “Batman” can easily get into! What is this story about? This story basically retells the origins of Bruce Wayne as Batman as it details Bruce Wayne’s first year as Batman and all the struggles he overcomes in his new role as Batman. This story also details about Commissioner James Gordon’s first year as a lieutenant of the police force before he became a commissioner. What I loved about this story: Frank Miller’s writing: Frank Miller’s writing was so amazing and simple to read through, especially if you are new to the “Batman” comics and you need a good place to jump right in the series. Frank Miller has created a more modern spin on the origins of Batman without changing the original history of Batman (his parents are killed before him when he was a child and he decides to become the famous caped crusader he is today) and I especially loved the way that Frank Miller details Batman’s first year fighting crime as being difficult since Bruce Wayne had difficulties in becoming the crime fighting caped crusader since the public viewed him as a menace the moment he started fighting crime. I also loved the way that Frank Miller shown the months that all of this was taking place from January fourth to December third which gave an extremely detailed timeline of this story. What really interested me about this story was learning about the origins of Commissioner James Gordon since I have not really been exposed to his origins and it was interesting to see how James Gordon actually started out as a lieutenant of a police force that was corrupted by the crimes of Gotham City and how he tried to do his best to protect the citizens of Gotham City from such criminal activities. David Mazzucchelli and Richmond Lewis’ artwork: David Mazzucchelli and Richmond Lewis’ artwork is simplistic yet gives a dramatic feel to the story, especially during the scenes where the characters are in shadows and they give out an eerie feel to the scene they are associated with, like during the scene where James Gordon is attacked by hit men and Richmond Lewis’ red coloring that flashes on the characters’ faces makes this scene extremely intense as you can see the pain and sorrow on James Gordon’s face. I also loved the shadowing that Richmond Lewis applies to Batman as Batman is usually shown in the dark and the dark shadowing makes him look menacing. What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: The only problem with this comic book novel is that there is some blood in some scenes, especially during the scenes where some of the characters are shot. Also, there is some language in this book that might offend some readers, so if you do not like dark themed books that deal with crimes in the cities, then this graphic novel might be hard to read through. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Batman: Year One” is not only a brilliant read for “Batman” fans everywhere, but it is also a great place to get into the “Batman” comic series, especially for new fans who are just getting into the “Batman” comics and want to know how Batman’s origins came about! Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Arguably one of the most essential Batman story in the comic world, Batman: Year One is a must-read. Fan of the dark knight or not, this story arc collecting all four comic issues (#404 to 407 published in 1987) from the comic series Batman tells the tale of Batman’s first attempt at wearing the dark cowl and cape. In fact, this trade paperback gives the readers the chance to live Gotham City through the eyes of Bruce Wayne (almost known as the You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Arguably one of the most essential Batman story in the comic world, Batman: Year One is a must-read. Fan of the dark knight or not, this story arc collecting all four comic issues (#404 to 407 published in 1987) from the comic series Batman tells the tale of Batman’s first attempt at wearing the dark cowl and cape. In fact, this trade paperback gives the readers the chance to live Gotham City through the eyes of Bruce Wayne (almost known as the man behind vigilante Batman) and James Gordon (Gotham City’s Police Department’s detective) as they seek their first baby steps in this city of corruption and evil. Personally, I was astonished by the artwork that got me engaged and hooked into the story line (big kudos to David Mazzucchelli’s and Richmond Lewis’s talents). With just a basic color pallet and an artwork typical of newspaper comics, this piece of art sustains greatness throughout all four issues. I’d have to say that the transitions between panels (from one scene to another) were brilliantly done on both an artistic and a storytelling level. (view spoiler)[ A scene that particularly illustrate this is when James Gordon is in a target practice range and talks about the kick and then Frank Miller would transition the story to Gordon laying his palm upon his wife Barbara's pregnant tummy only to hear another kind of kick. (hide spoiler)] Batman: Year One is gold. It’s mind-baffling-awesomeness does not end there. I’d have to add that the story itself is as fine as wine and only gets better every re-reads. As godlike as Batman is portrayed in our modern society, this story arc shows you just why you always want a Batman in your neighborhood. Bruce Wayne doesn’t go through this adventure as the world’s greatest detective with no flaws. He has to learn the ropes and actually fails multiple times to Gotham’s wrath. He has to climb the ladders and find a way to show everyone he isn’t a villain among the criminals that inhabit the city. He might eat a bullet and still manage to kick down a wall, but even those moments seem completely realistic to the reader’s eyes. And that’s why Frank Miller’s work is praised so much. Although Batman might seem like the center of attention, James Gordon gets just as much attention or, might I add, even more throughout the story arc. In fact, Gordon arrives in Gotham City and has to climb his way to the top just as much as Batman has to, in order to survive and help his city. As a man who respects the law and follows a path exempt of corruption, Gordon has to face his partner detective Flass as well as commissioner Loeb who both take a much more particular path when it comes to justice… a more criminal touch to things. In the end, both Bruce Wayne and James Gordon fight the evil in Gotham, meet their first failures in their attempt to help and learn from their mistakes with open arms. After all, their journey only just begun. If there was a common beginning to every comic reader’s legacy, I’d have to say that Batman: Year One is a beautiful place to start at. This flawless masterpiece (at least to my eyes) has one of the most interesting story line, a beautiful narration, an amazing artwork and a captivating and remarkable superhero to follow till the end of time. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: http://bookidote.wordpress.com

  24. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    First crack at a DC comic and this was definitely a great place to start. The artwork and color were amazing! I enjoyed just flipping through the pages and admiring the deep colors popping out of the dark backgrounds. I'm not even an art guy so I should probably stop trying to describe the artistic awesomeness of this book. Oh, and there was a story, too. A very dark, depressing story that felt like The Dark Knight trilogy, which definitely took plenty of inspiration from these pages. The story First crack at a DC comic and this was definitely a great place to start. The artwork and color were amazing! I enjoyed just flipping through the pages and admiring the deep colors popping out of the dark backgrounds. I'm not even an art guy so I should probably stop trying to describe the artistic awesomeness of this book. Oh, and there was a story, too. A very dark, depressing story that felt like The Dark Knight trilogy, which definitely took plenty of inspiration from these pages. The story was full of corrupt cops, evil villains, crime, and everything you would expect to find in Gotham City. It was action-packed, too. It was a very quick read and would have been even quicker if I didn't take time to admire the illustrations. Who's ready for Batman v. Superman?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    Batman year one (1987) Modern Batman #1 Year One is an absolute masterpiece and an achievement in story telling! Its not only one of the best Batman stories, but also my favorite origin story of any superhero! The foremost reason for this opinion is because of the way Frank Miller weaved the story together. Frank Miller not only builds the character of Bruce Wayne/Batman, but also lays foundation to a deeply corrupted underbelly of Gotham city, introduces Cat woman and gives the origin story Jim G Batman year one (1987) Modern Batman #1 Year One is an absolute masterpiece and an achievement in story telling! Its not only one of the best Batman stories, but also my favorite origin story of any superhero! The foremost reason for this opinion is because of the way Frank Miller weaved the story together. Frank Miller not only builds the character of Bruce Wayne/Batman, but also lays foundation to a deeply corrupted underbelly of Gotham city, introduces Cat woman and gives the origin story Jim Gordon deserves.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ярослава

    Не минуло і багатьох років, як я вирішила ознайомитися, так би мовити, з перших рук із супергеройськими архетипами, які деконструює Алан Мур. Якщо ваше знайомство з цим усім починається з Алана Мура і протягом п’ятнадцяти років ним же й закінчується, то читати потім Міллера всерйоз, звісно, тяжко. Графіка дуже красива, зате перекладач радше калькує англійську, ніж перекладає, що дивує, бо я в Оксенич перед тим читала цілком добрі переклади (“Сендмен”, “Оповідь служниці”). А тут у більшості фраз я Не минуло і багатьох років, як я вирішила ознайомитися, так би мовити, з перших рук із супергеройськими архетипами, які деконструює Алан Мур. Якщо ваше знайомство з цим усім починається з Алана Мура і протягом п’ятнадцяти років ним же й закінчується, то читати потім Міллера всерйоз, звісно, тяжко. Графіка дуже красива, зате перекладач радше калькує англійську, ніж перекладає, що дивує, бо я в Оксенич перед тим читала цілком добрі переклади (“Сендмен”, “Оповідь служниці”). А тут у більшості фраз я бачу англійську версію, не зазираючи в оригінал. Для справедливості зазначу, що є і просто дуже красиві формулювання, які мені не спали б на думку, а тепер користуватимуся (наприклад, поліція під час арешту кричить злочинцю “Ані руш!”) – але від того тільки прикріше за все інше. По-перше, надуживання “бути” і “мати”, які в українській мові мають значно обмеженіший ареал, ніж в англійській. Найсмішніше: * “Комісар поліції хоче мати труп” – це не про некрофілію, а про “wants a corpse”. Маса варіантів, аж до “наказує валити його на місці”, але “хоче мати труп” точно не належить до вдалих варіантів. * “Я не заслужив бути живим” – “I don’t deserve to be alive,” one presumes? – “Я не заслуговую на життя” По-друге, калька ідіом, які від цього втрачають зміст. Наприклад, “Дент і Ґордон у тебе на хвості. Вони радо схоплять тебе без штанів”. “catch you with your pants down” – піймати у незручній чи вразливій ситуації. Українською – щось на кшталт “Щойно ти підставишся” або “на гарячому”. По-друге, калька сталих зворотів. * “Детектив Свонсон переслідував кажанів до краю... і, говорячи про край...” (на панелі поліцейська машина злітає з урвища). Оце “speaking of” українською – не “говорячи про”, а “і, між іншим, про” чи “і, раз ми вже заговорили про” (напевно, можна знайти й елеґантніші рішення, але “говорячи про” – точно погано). Зазирнула в оригінал: те, що стало краєм – в оригіналі bitter end. Я розумію, це старий комікс із, судячи з усього, фіксованим розміром бабблів, але “край” – теж не найкращий варіант. * Раз у раз біда із формулою “It must be [прикметник]”. Наприклад, копу не вдається посадити злочинця, бо “деякі свідки змінили свідчення. Інші зникли. Це має бути прикро” – насправді “Прикро, мабуть”. Чи от Вейн представляє свою коханку/алібі: “Вона не говорить жодною мовою з тих, що знаю я”. Йому кажуть: “Це має бути зручно” (ясно ж, що “Зручно, мабуть”). По-третє, біда із неповними синонімами. * Вейн просить дворецького принести “ще пляшку, бо ця вже випарувалася” – вино видихалося. Може й випаруватися, але на це піде більше часу. * У поєдинку: “Той [суперник], про якого я турбувався, б’є...” – “the one I was worried about,” in all likelihood – а тут звучить, ніби він про нього піклувався. По-третє, певна кількість випадків рівня “що це взагалі таке?”. * “Сержани Ессен розповіла, що батьків Вейна вбив наркоман, коли йому було шість років”. Загальний культурний бекґраунд підказує, що шість років було таки Вейну, а не наркоману. Але Вейн у цьому підрядному реченні навіть не у називному відмінку, себто синтаксично це виснувати з речення неможливо. * “Отримали щеплення від кажанів” – в оригіналі, звісно, “for their bat bites”, себто покусаним зробили щеплення (але не від кажанів!!!!). На фоні перелічених вище об’єктивних багів якісь дрібніші формулювання, які можна покращувати, а можна й ні, відходять на задній план, але їх там також є. * “Він вважає себе готовим. Війну оголошено” => “Він думає, що готовий” чи взагалі “Він вирішив, що уже готовий”? * “мер і комісар поліції користуються копами як найманими вбивцями” => “використовують копів як найманих убивць” І т.д., і т.і. Зате назбирала прикладів, які даватиму студікам на майстер-класі з перекладу.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nigham

    My first comic-book ever! It was <3!!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    When DC decided it was time to retell the origin story of its some of its iconic super heroes, it was decided that while Superman and Wonder Woman's origin might need some freshening up, the mythology surrounding the origin of Batman worked without any tweaks or revamps. Instead what the origin of Batman needed was a different take on the classic origin. The result is Frank Miller's highly influential, much revered four-issue work Batman: Year One. Going back to the early days of the Batman saga, When DC decided it was time to retell the origin story of its some of its iconic super heroes, it was decided that while Superman and Wonder Woman's origin might need some freshening up, the mythology surrounding the origin of Batman worked without any tweaks or revamps. Instead what the origin of Batman needed was a different take on the classic origin. The result is Frank Miller's highly influential, much revered four-issue work Batman: Year One. Going back to the early days of the Batman saga, the story chronicles the rise of not only Batman but also Jim Gordon. A disgraced officer from another city, Gordon comes into the corrupt world of Gotham politics and starts trying to make a difference. At first, he's willing to hunt down the vigilante who is cleaning up Gotham's streets but over the course of the year he realizes that there could be something more to the Batman. Meanwhile, Bruce Wayne is taking is first tentative steps toward becoming the savior that Gotham needs and trying to avenge the death of his parents. If you've seen Batman Begins, you've seen elements of this story realized on-screen. However, while that movie is good, it's always fascinating to go back to the source material and see how its not only similar but also different. Year One works extremely well because of the parallel view points of Gordon and Bruce Wayne. It's easy to see why this four-part series is so influential and so cited as one of the great story arcs in comic book history. It easily earns all its accolades and then some.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Foad

    کمیک به روزهای ابتدایی بتمن می پردازه. فیلم "بتمن آغاز میکند" از کریستوفر نولان تا حد زیادی از روی این کمیک اقتباس کرده (تقابل بتمن و پلیس های فاسد مثل "فلاس"، تقابل با رییس مافیا "فالکونی"، استفاده از خفاش ها برای فرار و، انتهای داستان که با معرفی جوکر تموم میشه و...) نسبت به کمیک دیگه ی همین نویسنده (شوالیه ی تاریکی باز میگردد) خیلی ضعیف بود. بیشتر از اون که به شخصیت بتمن بپردازه و انگیزه های بتمن شدنش، به گوردون و پلیس فاسد گاتهام پرداخته بود. یکی دو تا شخصیت که معرفی شدن هم (از جمله سلینا کایل کمیک به روزهای ابتدایی بتمن می پردازه. فیلم "بتمن آغاز میکند" از کریستوفر نولان تا حد زیادی از روی این کمیک اقتباس کرده (تقابل بتمن و پلیس های فاسد مثل "فلاس"، تقابل با رییس مافیا "فالکونی"، استفاده از خفاش ها برای فرار و، انتهای داستان که با معرفی جوکر تموم میشه و...) نسبت به کمیک دیگه ی همین نویسنده (شوالیه ی تاریکی باز میگردد) خیلی ضعیف بود. بیشتر از اون که به شخصیت بتمن بپردازه و انگیزه های بتمن شدنش، به گوردون و پلیس فاسد گاتهام پرداخته بود. یکی دو تا شخصیت که معرفی شدن هم (از جمله سلینا کایل/زن گربه ای، یا آلفرد خدمتکار بتمن) خیلی مختصر و بدون پرداخت بودن. خلاصه، خیلی میتونست بهتر از این باشه. همچنان برای آشنا شدن با شروع بتمن، کمیک "بتمن: زمین نخست" رو پیشنهاد میکنم.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I read this slim volume in an hour or so, because I've long heard good things about this take on Batman's origins and earliest days, and I heard it was a source of inspiration for Christopher Nolan's Batman films, for which my appreciation has only grown after seeing them both again recently. One of the biggest pleasures of the films for me is Gary Oldman's portrayal of Jim Gordon, and easily my favorite thing about Year One is Jim Gordon. In his review of The Dark Knight, Peter Travers said tha I read this slim volume in an hour or so, because I've long heard good things about this take on Batman's origins and earliest days, and I heard it was a source of inspiration for Christopher Nolan's Batman films, for which my appreciation has only grown after seeing them both again recently. One of the biggest pleasures of the films for me is Gary Oldman's portrayal of Jim Gordon, and easily my favorite thing about Year One is Jim Gordon. In his review of The Dark Knight, Peter Travers said that Oldman "is so skilled that he makes virtue exciting," and it can certainly be said of the complex, flawed Gordon portrayed here--his virtue is exciting. Don't get me wrong, I love Batman, but I've always been a sucker for working-class heroes and this book makes Gordon as much a hero, in his everyday way, as Batman is in his grandiose and theatrical way. I also like the way that, like the films, this tale addresses the issue of escalation among the criminals of Gotham. Batman doesn't create himself to fight off the Jokers and Riddlers and Penguins of the city. He starts by fighting run-of-the-mill thugs and organized crime families. These heightened criminal elements are, in a way, a result of Batman's existence. But, yeah, mostly it's about Jim Gordon for me.

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